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Fresh pow

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
So today in Edmonton, it's snowing quite hard, so I decided to go skiing to see what's all the fuss about fresh powder. Snowboarders and skiers seem to love powder, so I thought I would too. I had just gotten new boots but had yet to buy skis for myself, so I rented some skis. Excited for my first powder experience, I realized it was kind of difficult gliding around. I couldn't even properly glide on a long beginner slope, I had to practically push myself down with my poles. On the other steeper slopes, I glided alright, but it was a lot harder than on groomed slopes. Something that kind of bothered me as well was that some of the other skiers seem to have no problem gliding everywhere. Some had powder skis on, but others had skis that looked like the same type of skis as the rentals I had on.

So I was wondering, how could I have a better powder experience in the future? Should I get powder skis, as well as "all mountain skis" or something? Or is there just some special wax being used on regular skis to glide better on powder slopes?
post #2 of 5

Lack of wax, or your weight too far forward, or the skis too short/soft for you all might contribute.  The right wax is temperature dependent, and not dependent on the type of snow for recreational skiers.  Universal wax for all temperatures except the wettest is usually OK except for high performance skiers.

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Oh I see. So I'm still wondering what kind of skis would fit me the most for the conditions I typically ski at. I'm thinking all-mountain skis, since I'd probably expect lots of crud to come when powder hits Edmonton. Would twin tipped all-mountain skis be all that better than non-tipped tails?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiredknees View Post

Lack of wax, or your weight too far forward, or the skis too short/soft for you all might contribute.  The right wax is temperature dependent, and not dependent on the type of snow for recreational skiers.  Universal wax for all temperatures except the wettest is usually OK except for high performance skiers.



 

post #4 of 5
Unless you expect to take the skis into a terrain park, there's little reason to have twin tips. An all-mountain ski with an early rise tip (almost every ski maker produces these) would help in general powder and especially in crud.
post #5 of 5

Try going faster.  Powder will tend to slow down your skis as you found out on the longer green.  On mild blues, point your skis basically down the fall line and go.  I'd also say to try to ski with both feet closer together than you might on hard pack.  If your skis are pretty narrow in the shovel/waist, you may find leaning slightly back helps keep the tips from diving in.

 

Good luck and have fun.

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