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Is scraping and brushing useful for a recreational skier? - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Thread Starter 
Hmm, this is going back to the attitude of do it right completely or quit ski that's so prevalent on this forum.

Mind you for people outside u.s. Anything you think is cheap likely costs two or three times, or simply not available.
post #32 of 36


The website http://skituningtable.com has the new 2011 Wide Swix tables for the same price.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

YOu can also but or build a portable tuning table or buy one for  $110.00 http://www.backcountry.com/swix-waxing-table-small

 



 

post #33 of 36



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl 

.... Anything you think is cheap likely costs two or three times, or simply not available.



Here is an economical and effective solution: you will need wax, ironing paper, iron, scraper, hand brush.

 

At home: Crayon a thin layer of wax on the base, spread QUICKLY with the iron to get the base coated. Iron in using the fiberlene between the iron and the base. When you are finished you will have a thin layer of wax left on the base.

 

On the hill: Scrape lightly right into a trash can, it may be a bit clumsy at first but it can be done. Brush and go. Not perfect, but a good result with minimal effort and expense. No tables, no vises, no mess...

 

Back oin the late 80's Toko had a product called Dibloc Tex wax, it was fiberlene impregnated with wax. You would warm up your iron, put the foot-long sheet between your iron and the base and drag the sheet down the length of the base. I remember doing it it on the floor of our NYC apartment, no mess at all and my wife was happy (as long as I did her skis as well). Then I would scrape and brush on the mountain and the skis ran great. The crayoning the wax and ironing with fiberlene accomplishes the same thing at a much lower price.

 

post #34 of 36

If I scrape at home, I brush.  Sometimes I forget to scrape and end up in the parking lot with wax on my skis.  So I pull out whatever I have on hand to scrape with, scrape em down, and go ski.  I don't notice a single bit of difference in the way the skis are on the snow, in any conditions.

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

I've been wondering, if I just go to the hills for fun and get some exercise in winter, does it really matter if I scrape/brush the ski at all after waxing? I've been leaving wax as is and any excess is gone after a run or two anyway (especially with the icy craptacular winter this year), and it saves a bit of time and a lot of mess. I don't care about getting down the slope a couple of seconds faster, and the first two runs are warm up runs on easy groomer anyway.

So, should I bother scraping and brushing?

Yes you should.  Any wax left on the surface of the base is not good.  The geometry will be bad from the extra wax.  Plus your glide will suck wind.  Notice how you get passed up on a flat spot?
Here is how to do it.


 

post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

If you invest $17 in a box of Swix fiberlene sheets, and only crayon the wax without dripping it, not much muss or fuss. Still only a few minute job.

 

YOu can also but or build a portable tuning table or buy one for  $110.00 http://www.backcountry.com/swix-waxing-table-small

 

Hook your vises on and away you go!

 

I have one we used when we traveled to races. Handy!


 

if that is too much for somebody, maybe they should give up skiing &  take up shuffleboard on a Holland America Cruise ship! biggrin.gif



 

 

Just playing the devils advocate.  Remember this is the rec skier.  It's not the ironing that's the mess- back to the original topic-it's the scraping/brushing.  If you're advocating fiberline in lieu of scraping/brushing, maybe that's the way to go, but the purists will say you still got to still scrape and brush that out=some mess.

 

And $110 IS a lot for the rec skier (sure i get that they can save if they build their own).  Compare it to paying $7 for the quickie machine wax that is offered at the base lodge.  That's 15times before you start breaking even, not counting labor, or having to buy wax.  


I fall in the rec category also

Yes, the initial investment of equipment does seem like a lot of money

But over the years, paying someone $15-20 for a hot wax job adds up and mad me resistant to get it waxed consistently for optimal performance during the season

Since my investment last season, I do wax, scrape & brush more often and I have benefitted from it

Finding sales on equipment and supplies is a good thing. I took advantage of Doctor D's 30% off sale to restock on wax and got a multi-edge tuner this year


Sent from my iPhone. There may be horrible grammar and misspelling involved
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