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Griffon forward pressure: flush or 1 click tight?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

For those of you who run Griffons on your mid-fats, do you go flush, or 1-click in for the forward-pressure?

 

Do you run regular DIN, or go higher?

post #2 of 17

Take them to a shop and have a qualified person check them.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NSskier View Post

Take them to a shop and have a qualified person check them.



A qualified technician already mounted the bindings.

 

I am (and so is a trained chimpanzee) qualified to twist a screwdriver and adjust forward pressure.

 

I have made them flush, but heard on this site about people taking griffons a click in to prevent unwanted releases.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

...I am (and so is a trained chimpanzee) qualified to twist a screwdriver and adjust forward pressure...

 


icon14.gif

 

 

post #5 of 17

Why do you keep torturing yourself? TGR

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

Actually my title doesn't make sense as those of you who have Griffons know there is no "click" whatsoever... rather, the dial just turns without clicks or noises.

post #7 of 17

Have you actually had a lot of unwarranted releases on those skis that you don't have on other skis?

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

Have you actually had a lot of unwarranted releases on those skis that you don't have on other skis?



No; I read about them.  Markers have a bad reputation.  I'll probably jinx myself for saying this, but I have NEVER, EVER, had a pre-release in all my years of skiing, from any brand.

 

Maybe I'm not heavy enough.

post #9 of 17

A lot of what you read about on the internet is bad information, completely useless.The BS filter has to be on high alert.  One of the hardest charging skiers I talk to is way over 200 pounds and says that ONLY Marker holds up to his abuse. Claims he destroys everything else. He lives in the Denver area and skies a lot every season.  YMMV

post #10 of 17

We have marker griffons on several skis at the performance rental shop where i work. The proper method for set up is tightening the screw flush to the heel housing with the boot in the binding, then remove the boot, then put the boot back in the binding to see if the screw is still flush then repeat adjustment if it is not flush.

IMO it is better to make DIN adjustments to counteract pre release rather than mess with forward pressure.

post #11 of 17
Flush. Too much forward pressure keeps your boot from releasing by jamming your boot forward into the toe piece. This is why we have a DIN setting.

I've also never pre-released on any brand of binding.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



 I have NEVER, EVER, had a pre-release in all my years of skiing, from any brand.

 

If you don't have pre-releases then you don't have any need to change your forward pressure set up. Important to remember that there are 2 jobs a binding does: release when you fall and stay on when you don't. You need it to do BOTH well to protect you.
 

 

post #13 of 17

I've had no prereleases with Markers--both griffons and the infamous biometric toes--set with the screw flush and with the DIN set one half number low, in deference to my age. (I set my bindings as if I were still 49 and then back off one half number.Works for me). BTW I once saw a Marker DIN chart in a shop that had skier levels I-IV (for IV you dropped down 3 lines instead of 2). Makes sens for skiing no fall terrain where a prelease would be very serious.

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

I am (and so is a trained chimpanzee) qualified to twist a screwdriver and adjust forward pressure.
 


A friend of mine who works in a bike shop believes that spoke wrenches should be free, because you can quickly do more damage with a spoke wrench then virtually any other tool on a bike.  (And that way his shop gets more $$$ from repairs when people realize they've hopelessly f-ed things up).  Turning a spoke wrench is easy.  Turning the right spoke(s) the right amount?  Not so much.  i.e., turning a screw is easy.  Knowing why you're doing it...  I've seen some really "interesting" ways of tuning bikes based off of a highly-incomplete knowledge of what exactly was being adjusted.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



No; I read about them.  Markers have a bad reputation.  I'll probably jinx myself for saying this, but I have NEVER, EVER, had a pre-release in all my years of skiing, from any brand.

 

Maybe I'm not heavy enough.


Why are you thinking of messing with your bindings if you've never pre-released?

 

post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

I had to adjust the forward-pressure anyway as the bindings were remotely-mounted for a BSL.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

I had to adjust the forward-pressure anyway as the bindings were remotely-mounted for a BSL.



Dude. Bring it to a shop w/ a boot. Get them set-- and tested! 

 

The flushness and DIN numbers are not for trusting from an unknown starting point (AKA "remotely-mounted"-- hehe.. does that mean partially mounted...). A proper binding test will determine IF the marked DIN setting matches the ACTUAL, measured force to remove YOUR boot from YOUR binding as set on YOUR ski. Get 'em properly tested/set. Go skiing. Adjust (if needed-- but I'm gonna vote you don't need 'em adjusted) from there. 

 

Or, pretend to be a chimp w/ a screwdriver. And make sure your health insurance covers XYZ.

 

Let's remember, you also suggested putting klister on your skis to improve bump skiing, and using a blow torch... for something...  

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



A qualified technician already mounted the bindings.

 

I am (and so is a trained chimpanzee) qualified to twist a screwdriver and adjust forward pressure.

 

I have made them flush, but heard on this site about people taking griffons a click in to prevent unwanted releases.


I decided to leave the *Chimp out of the comparison. Where have you read about people increasing the forward pressure of Griffons? I have used Griffons off and on since they were introduced...Jesters longer, I have never seen NOR heard of anyone doing this. There are bindings yes that you MIGHT want to do this with, these are NOT them. 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



No; I read about them.  Markers have a bad reputation.  I'll probably jinx myself for saying this, but I have NEVER, EVER, had a pre-release in all my years of skiing, from any brand.

 

Maybe I'm not heavy enough.



Why are you looking for a problem that is not there?



Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

If you don't have pre-releases then you don't have any need to change your forward pressure set up. Important to remember that there are 2 jobs a binding does: release when you fall and stay on when you don't. You need it to do BOTH well to protect you.
 

 


Truer and more simple words have never been spoken about the function of a binding. 

 

 

*No Chimps were harmed or defamed in the **creation of this post

** No need to get into THAT version of "creation" in THIS conversations that included chimps.


Edited by Philpug - 4/2/12 at 6:56am
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Griffon forward pressure: flush or 1 click tight?