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Choosing first pair of Skis

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi there, recently I have been interested in purchasing my first pair of skis. I am leaning towards All-Mountain twin tips as I am mianly going to ski groomed and powder but also want twins so I can hit the park and learn the ropes because its such a fun thing to do. So, can anyone recommend a pair of skis that are mainly all mountains but with twin tips? I've heard the volkl bridge are good but are there any other good ones? Also, it's not essential but, can you recommend some good single tip all mountain skis if I decide against twins.

 

Usefull Info: 15 YO, 70kg, 5"10/5"11, Ski anywhere as I'm a UK resident, Very confident skiier, ski all types of runs in all conditions, been skiing for about 6 or 7 years (only about 7-8 weeks on slope thought but I ski every wednesday at local ski centre) and I have my own boots.

 

Cheers,

 

Harry

post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 

Also what size skis would you recommend for mainly piste, then park and powder last as I'm normally with an instructor so don't do major off piste.

post #3 of 10

Hi,

 

Looks like your first post so welcome to EpicSki!

 

No matter what kind of ski you're after, until you're familiar with how a particular company's skis feel and respond to YOUR skiing, the best is advice is to DEMO. You need to feel them on your feet.

 

Every company's skis feel and respond differently to you than they do to me, so what I like should not matter to you (or vice-versa).

 

Further, even on the same feet two similar spec skis from rival companies may behave very differently. For example, I happen to know that Atomics, K2s and Volkyls usually work well for me... while Blizzards, Elans and Rossis often don't. I know this from years of experience on those brands, not from specifications. Because I know Atomic I can choose one from specs and know pretty much how it will ski vs. some other Atomic. But I can't use specs to choose between that Atomic and a supposedly similar ski from some brand I've never skied. If I had an interest in an unfamiliar brand I'd have to ski it. 

 

Demo costs are not a serious obstacle because most shops will credit those toward a purchase. smile.gif

 

How to demo? Easy. Find a shop that demos something you're interested in. Ski as much variety terrain and as many types of skiing as you can. Here's the neat thing: when a ski really "clicks" with your style you'll know it INSTANTLY. A big ass grin will spread across your face and you'll find yourself skiing tougher stuff than you ever could before with confidence, speed and style.

beercheer.gif

 

When that happens, stop demoing and buy. UNTIL that happens, keep demoing. Life's too short to ski on boards that don't work, no matter how good someone else thinks they are.

 

Have fun!

post #4 of 10

Did you get your boots from a competent boot fitter?  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wiki about fitting and check the shell fit of your boots to see if it's correct.  If the boots are too big, you need to start over.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
@douglyskiright Thank you for that informative answer, I'll be sure to try and get my parents to take me to the ski slope nearby for demoing. But, would you recommend a start point that fits my agenda?

@mtcyclist I did, as far a I know, the guy knew what he was doing they weren't too big or too small and they made a difference when I skied in killington just last week. But I will check the forums you suggested and get back to you.
post #6 of 10

Harry,

 

I don't ski in parks or switch (not intentionally anyway!) so I've no experience with twin tips.

 

For all-mountain skis... if you ski Killington (for example) more often than you venture off-piste for bottomless powder, you'd want a general purpose all-mountain ski with an on-piste/front side bias. If that sounds about right to you, demoing any of the following would give you a sense of what the company's skis are about...

  • K2 Richter - very versatile, great in all Western US conditions short of bottomless powder, a little more forgiving than most of the others here, good edgehold but not quite at the Atomic/Volkyl level for the firm conditions we often encounter at places like Killington (one of my home mtns BTW), I hit the speed limit on them on what passes for hard snow in Utah last year so they're not my first choice for Eastern US conditions where I mostly ski, love 'em out West
  • Atomic Nomad series:
  1. Smoke Ti - narrow underfoot so quick to turn but not so great in powder, a true on-piste/front side ski, a step down the performance scale vs. the Richter or the other Atomics below
  2. Blackeye Ti - super edgehold and a higher speed limit than Smoke or Richter, my current go-to ski for Eastern US conditions, enough rocker to be fun in bumps/trees (IF you're on top of your game) but solid under foot for slicing groomers at anything short of true race speeds, I take them anywhere and have a blast (but remember, that's just me)
  3. Crimson Ti - wider underfoot than the Blackeyes so biased a little more toward powder/off-piste or cruising groomers with big arcs, if I skied Western US conditions more this or the Richters or would be my go-to Atomic for front side

 

We're the same height but I'm only ~64kg. (Hey, I'm skinnier than a 15yo? Cool!) As you're a stone heavier (English, metric, whatever!) if you stopped growing now we'd probably prefer similar length skis or you might prefer slightly longer. However, it's likely you'll continue growing and that your skiing will advance too, so for non-park skis I'd suggest trying one length longer than I use. I ski the Atomic Blackeyes and K2 Richtors in a 167cm. If you're as strong a skier as you seem you might want one size up, 171/174cm. It's only a demo so you can always try a shorter length if it seems too much.

 

Note, these are all advanced-expert level "adult" skis. They'd be a bit much for some 15yo's. Be realistic about whether you're ready for them. Don't go for cool graphics (first) or status, go for what makes your feet happy when you ski. All these companies make similar but easier flexing models geared toward younger skiers. It sounds like you're beyond that but demo-ing will help you find out.  Enjoy!

 

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks again for a very informative answer, I was actually looking at the K2 Richtors early today and on K2's website they have 24 reviews averaging 4.8/5, which is obviously very promising! As for which ski I am going to get I now feel that I am going to ditch the idea of twin tips and either go for the K2's or the Blackeye. But, as I won't likely be buying them just now I could find other skis or be recommended other skis in the gap between now and buying.

 

I also checked with my local Ellis Brigham (UK ski store) which is situated at the artificial snow slope so I will be able to demo both skis and chose a length as they sell both the Blackeye and Richtors. Thanks for the help, if you have any other suggestions and wish to share your time, that would greatly appreciated!

post #8 of 10

Just go and ski some different skis and see if you like them.  

 

Don't put too much stock on reviews of K2 skis on K2's website, I'd think the reviews are a bit biased since the company isn't going to post negative reviews of their own products.  If you're looking for reviews look for more unbiased reviews at unaffiliated websites like Realskiers.com, here or TGR.

 

Mike
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vulcan0 View Post

Thanks again for a very informative answer, I was actually looking at the K2 Richtors early today and on K2's website they have 24 reviews averaging 4.8/5, which is obviously very promising! As for which ski I am going to get I now feel that I am going to ditch the idea of twin tips and either go for the K2's or the Blackeye. But, as I won't likely be buying them just now I could find other skis or be recommended other skis in the gap between now and buying.

 

I also checked with my local Ellis Brigham (UK ski store) which is situated at the artificial snow slope so I will be able to demo both skis and chose a length as they sell both the Blackeye and Richtors. Thanks for the help, if you have any other suggestions and wish to share your time, that would greatly appreciated!



 

post #9 of 10

Last bit o' rambling... those brands that work for me all build their skis on wood cores. Every ski that's worked well for me has been, from my first Atomics (a soft SL race ski back in 1990) to the Richters and Blackeyes of today.

 

But that's me. Your skiing may respond to something different - a foam core being the major alternative. Ask your shop if they have any skis similar to the Richter/Blackeye but with a foam core, then demo both types. You're no novice so I guarantee you'll feel a difference. If one core material suits you significantly better you'll save a ton of time and money over the years.

 

Not to sound too much the codger, but it's been a pleasure conversing with a young person who thinks and writes in coherent sentences and paragraphs. Okay, that did sound codgery, lol, but I'll let it stand!

 

 

P. S. +1 to mtcyclist's boot question. Skis are sexy, boots are important. Any good skier can make any decent ski work. I've taken skis down wildly inappropriate runs and had a blast (I used to ski bumps on straight, stiff-as-bricks, 205cm Volkyl GS race skis eek.gifbiggrin.gif) or at least survived (I once found myself riding floppy, edgeless powder boards on a rock-hard WC downhill eek.gifeek.gifeek.gif ). But the skis only work if the boots do. Put the best skier in misfitting boots and his performance (and comfort) will deteriorate rapidly.

 

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

@MikeC Yeah I wil probably demo a variety of skis, the two DouglySkiRight recommended and some the shop recommends.

 

@DouglySkiRight I think the only skis I have tried are wood based - well at least the two pairs I've skiied a week on! I could never imagine a foam based ski perosnally, might give it a try! Ahh don't worry I don't mind who I talk to if they know what they're on about, and you definitley do! Thanks :) Yeah I agree, my boots really made a difference when I skiied with them for the first time in Killington I really felt the difference, carving was easier and more responsive and I was much quicker in turns when needed.

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