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Gs Skis

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

 

I am a 15 year old high school racer and i'm looking for some GS skis.  I have Fischer SC Pros now.  They are '09 165's and are now a FIS reg SL ski for a 165.  I would like a shorter SL ski but do not need it as I am growing into these.

I'm 5' 11" at 143lb's(trying to drop some though)

 

 

post #2 of 19

Trying to lose weight at 143??? LOL.

 

The key in racing is to GAIN weight (well, muscle mass that is).

post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post

 

I am a 15 year old high school racer and i'm looking for some GS skis.  I have Fischer SC Pros now.  They are '09 165's and are now a FIS reg SL ski for a 165.  I would like a shorter SL ski but do not need it as I am growing into these.

I'm 5' 11" at 143lb's(trying to drop some though)

 

 


gain wait. literally. protein and fat and weight training is your friend

 

post #4 of 19

Sounds like you don't need a FIS ski. You just racing high school or are you in a USSA program? If just high school, don't go for FIS skis. You will own races on "cheater" skis.

 

Don't gain weight for the sake of gaining weight. Improve your strength-to-weight ratio. That will pay off more; now and later in life. Core and general strength training will do that. You're not on the FIS path, so just be fit, and ski on what you need to in order to be fast in your races.

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Sounds like you don't need a FIS ski. You just racing high school or are you in a USSA program? If just high school, don't go for FIS skis. You will own races on "cheater" skis.

 

Don't gain weight for the sake of gaining weight. Improve your strength-to-weight ratio. That will pay off more; now and later in life. Core and general strength training will do that. You're not on the FIS path, so just be fit, and ski on what you need to in order to be fast in your races.



sounds good....... thats why i'm liking my SC's and I am 12% body fat, supposed to get down to at least 8% and then start building more muscle.  I'm a major biker in the summer so I have huge calves and thighs, but not much for upper body strength.......:(

post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post



sounds good....... thats why i'm liking my SC's and I am 12% body fat, supposed to get down to at least 8% and then start building more muscle.  I'm a major biker in the summer so I have huge calves and thighs, but not much for upper body strength.......:(


Instead of trying to lose fat, work on putting on muscle right now the more muscle you put on the more calories you'll burn the less your BF % will be in the long run.

Also as others said, more weight is better for racing and you'll be much stronger ===> more powerful, longer skis etc.


BTW a normal BF% for male skiers is between 11-13%

post #7 of 19

Go for a 180 or 185 cm "cheater" race ski.  If you don't have a concept for what this is right now, it will be a ski listed as "GS," "GSR," "GS pro" "RC pro" "GSX" "iSpeed," or something like that THAT COMES WITH BINDINGS.  The listed radius will be somewhere between 17 and 19.  These will work great for you.  Keep them waxed and tuned well.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Go for a 180 or 185 cm "cheater" race ski.  If you don't have a concept for what this is right now, it will be a ski listed as "GS," "GSR," "GS pro" "RC pro" "GSX" "iSpeed," or something like that THAT COMES WITH BINDINGS.  The listed radius will be somewhere between 17 and 19.  These will work great for you.  Keep them waxed and tuned well.



Oh yeah wax every day, tuning every other(at least), and I was looking at Head igs rd in womens or i speed.  I wouldn't have to get a cheater if I got a ski from 2-3 years ago.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post



Oh yeah wax every day, tuning every other(at least), and I was looking at Head igs rd in womens or i speed.  I wouldn't have to get a cheater if I got a ski from 2-3 years ago.



Just so you know, HEAD's Women's GS skis have a radius of 25.4 (even the shortest in 178).  That is kind of big unless you are doing full-on GS sets on steep hills, or are a little heavier.

 

Between those I'd recommend the iSpeed SW.

 

If you want a 21 meter ski, I believe Nordica and Volkl still offer a "Race stock" ski (176 and 175, respectively) in a 21 meter radius.  But as you get older and go faster, that may be too short for GS.

post #10 of 19

I have a 183 Fischer WC GS available in the (very) hard to find 23m womens race stock version as I have switched to teh 27m

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post

 

I'm 5' 11" at 143lb's(trying to drop some though)

 

 

 

Unless you are a girl....NO, NO, NO, NO, NO!  You do not want to drop weight!

 

Step 1:  

Read this:  http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332677455&sr=8-1

and/or

Watch this: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/B001U9FDP2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332677589&sr=8-1

 

Step 2:  Train

 

Step 3:  

Eat like this: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/#axzz1q88dxnuz

AND EAT OF LOT OF IT!!  Meat and potatoes are your friend.

 

Step 4:  Sleep.  Min 8hrs.

 

Step 5:  Revel in your new muscularity and feel embarrassed that you ever thought you needed to lose weight at 5'11" and 143lbs.

 

 

 


Edited by Talking Monkey - 3/25/12 at 5:53am
post #12 of 19

Don't thoughtlessly encourage girls to lose weight - anorexia is real.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

ok ill check it out, but im a guy, need to build more muscle, and lots of hs SL skiers are running 120-130 lol.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talking Monkey View Post

 

Unless you are a girl....NO, NO, NO, NO, NO!  You do not want to drop weight!

 

Step 1:  

Read this:  http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-3rd-Mark-Rippetoe/dp/0982522738/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332677455&sr=8-1

and/or

Watch this: http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Basic-Barbell-Training/dp/B001U9FDP2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332677589&sr=8-1

 

Step 2:  Train

 

Step 3:  

Eat like this: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/#axzz1q88dxnuz

AND EAT OF LOT OF IT!!  Meat and potatoes are your friend.

 

Step 4:  Sleep.  Min 8hrs.

 

Step 5:  Revel in your new muscularity and feel embarrassed that you ever thought you needed to lose weight at 5'11" and 143lbs.

 

 

 



 

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Don't thoughtlessly encourage girls to lose weight - anorexia is real.



That is not at all what I was saying.  My point was, If the OP is a girl, then that height/weight may be fine and it might even be fine to lose a little depending on her frame size (http://www.healthchecksystems.com/heightweightchart.htm).  I am a big proponent of girls also training for strength and nothing pisses me off more than vegan/vegetarian/low-fat propaganda that encourages young girls to have an unhealthy body image and/or become anorexic.

 

For a 5'11" male at 143lbs, I would be concerned about him being underweight, especially if he loses more (http://www.healthdiscovery.net/links/calculators/ideal_bw_men.htm).  Granted the OP is only 15, but the trend should be in the upward direction, he should not be trying to lose weight, especially if he wants to be an athlete.  Male anorexia is real too.

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talking Monkey View Post



That is not at all what I was saying.  My point was, If the OP is a girl, then that height/weight may be fine and it might even be fine to lose a little depending on her frame size (http://www.healthchecksystems.com/heightweightchart.htm).  I am a big proponent of girls also training for strength and nothing pisses me off more than vegan/vegetarian/low-fat propaganda that encourages young girls to have an unhealthy body image and/or become anorexic.

 

For a 5'11" male at 143lbs, I would be concerned about him being underweight, especially if he loses more (http://www.healthdiscovery.net/links/calculators/ideal_bw_men.htm).  Granted the OP is only 15, but the trend should be in the upward direction, he should not be trying to lose weight, especially if he wants to be an athlete.  Male anorexia is real too.


i'm trying to gain muscle, not fat.  What FREE sources can you give that will lead me to the same goal as the links you previously stated?

 

post #16 of 19

You do not want to lose weight if you want to have a good career in alpine ski racing because body weight is an advantage. It doesn't really matter whether the body weight comes from fat or muscle, the extra weight will equal extra speed.  However the opposite is true for endurance sports, you mentioned biking for example.  It is best to put on extra weight in the form of muscle, that will reduce your body fat percentage as well improving your "strength to weight" ratio.  Would I would not do is try to lose your body fat because body fat is an advantage in alpine ski racing and it sounds like yours is in a good range.  

 

As far as skis goes, you would probably be better off with a longer ski.  If you can pick up a used FIS ski to train on that would be ideal.  Sometimes you can get one for around $100-$200, you just have to make sure the edges aren't too worn down.  I ski on a used FIS ski that is 186cm and has a 21m radius, and I use it for training all the time, I also race on mine, but I am not racing competitively.  

post #17 of 19

Most of what you need to know with regards to strength training can be found here:

http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Starting_Strength_Wiki

 

Programming:  

http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/FAQ:The_Program#Three_Flavors_of_Starting_Strength

 

Another option if you want a program that focusses on strength development but also has some time scheduled to build/maintain your conditioning:

http://70sbig.com/wp-content/uploads/files/Articles/Lascek_S&CP_v2.0.pdf  (from http://www.70sbig.com)

 

Doing the SS workouts without supplemental conditioning would not necessarily be a bad thing.  You are generally better off focussing on one goal at a time.  If that goal is to be bigger and stronger, you are more likely to be successful if you avoid excessive conditioning work during your strength training period.

 

One caveat: These programs call for a 3X5 rep scheme.  Sets of 5 can be very productive, but I would strongly recommend starting with 10 rep sets while you are learning the movements.  The weight you would use for a 10 rep set will be lighter and you have more reps to really figure out the form.  Also, the higher rep will help strengthen the connective tissue and help you to avoid injuries.  After you get comfortable with the movements over the course of a few months, you can start adding weight and decreasing the reps to 5.   

 

Proper Form:

Take the time to really learn how to do the exercises in those programs properly or don't bother (but also don't get paralyzed by over analysis; get a good grasp of the basics and then learn by doing).  

http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Video

 

Nutrition:

Same link as before:  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/#axzz1q88dxnuz

 

Scroll down to "Is it Primal?"  Eat food off of that list in large quantities, especially post workout.  Ignore some of the low-carb bias on that site though - eat plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, and white rice, but avoid wheat, and avoid all processed crap-in-a-box.  Eat REAL foods - chicken, beef, eggs cooked in butter,....  

 

I don't want you to get fat and you won't.  As long as you are eating clean foods and lifting heavy, your body will tend to partition nutrients into muscle synthesis.  The problem is, building muscle/getting stronger is a very metabolically expensive process and requires a lot of energy.  That's why you need to eat a LOT.  I'm not going to lie though, it is possible that some fat might come along for the ride, but with all the new muscle to burn calories, it will come off very easily.

 

And again, don't neglect sleep.  That is where the recovery/growth happens.  Nothing will mess this up faster than not getting enough sleep (it will encourage fat gain and prevent you from progressing the way you should).

 

Full Disclosure:  A few years ago, I was 6', 156lbs.  Doing the above, I put on 30lbs of muscle and very little fat (still have teh visible abz - LOL), and I'm much older than you (downward slope on the testosterone curve).  You are still a bit younger than is optimal from a hormonal perspective for growth and recovery (you will have much more testosterone in your late teens/early twenties), but learning this stuff now will give you a great head start - especially if you want to be an athlete. I wish I had this info when I was 15!

 

Ultimately, your goal should not be to match the weights of HS skiers.  The weights of some world cup racers around your height:

Ivica Kostelic: 5'11", 207lbs

Ted Ligety:  5'11",  179lbs

Benjamin Raich:  6', 183lbs

 

 

 

 

 

post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ligety......................boom.    eggs cooked in EVOO i hope????? lol
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talking Monkey View Post

Most of what you need to know with regards to strength training can be found here:

http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Starting_Strength_Wiki

 

Programming:  

http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/FAQ:The_Program#Three_Flavors_of_Starting_Strength

 

Another option if you want a program that focusses on strength development but also has some time scheduled to build/maintain your conditioning:

http://70sbig.com/wp-content/uploads/files/Articles/Lascek_S&CP_v2.0.pdf  (from http://www.70sbig.com)

 

Doing the SS workouts without supplemental conditioning would not necessarily be a bad thing.  You are generally better off focussing on one goal at a time.  If that goal is to be bigger and stronger, you are more likely to be successful if you avoid excessive conditioning work during your strength training period.

 

One caveat: These programs call for a 3X5 rep scheme.  Sets of 5 can be very productive, but I would strongly recommend starting with 10 rep sets while you are learning the movements.  The weight you would use for a 10 rep set will be lighter and you have more reps to really figure out the form.  Also, the higher rep will help strengthen the connective tissue and help you to avoid injuries.  After you get comfortable with the movements over the course of a few months, you can start adding weight and decreasing the reps to 5.   

 

Proper Form:

Take the time to really learn how to do the exercises in those programs properly or don't bother (but also don't get paralyzed by over analysis; get a good grasp of the basics and then learn by doing).  

http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Video

 

Nutrition:

Same link as before:  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/#axzz1q88dxnuz

 

Scroll down to "Is it Primal?"  Eat food off of that list in large quantities, especially post workout.  Ignore some of the low-carb bias on that site though - eat plenty of potatoes, sweet potatoes, and white rice, but avoid wheat, and avoid all processed crap-in-a-box.  Eat REAL foods - chicken, beef, eggs cooked in butter,....  

 

I don't want you to get fat and you won't.  As long as you are eating clean foods and lifting heavy, your body will tend to partition nutrients into muscle synthesis.  The problem is, building muscle/getting stronger is a very metabolically expensive process and requires a lot of energy.  That's why you need to eat a LOT.  I'm not going to lie though, it is possible that some fat might come along for the ride, but with all the new muscle to burn calories, it will come off very easily.

 

And again, don't neglect sleep.  That is where the recovery/growth happens.  Nothing will mess this up faster than not getting enough sleep (it will encourage fat gain and prevent you from progressing the way you should).

 

Full Disclosure:  A few years ago, I was 6', 156lbs.  Doing the above, I put on 30lbs of muscle and very little fat (still have teh visible abz - LOL), and I'm much older than you (downward slope on the testosterone curve).  You are still a bit younger than is optimal from a hormonal perspective for growth and recovery (you will have much more testosterone in your late teens/early twenties), but learning this stuff now will give you a great head start - especially if you want to be an athlete. I wish I had this info when I was 15!

 

Ultimately, your goal should not be to match the weights of HS skiers.  The weights of some world cup racers around your height:

Ivica Kostelic: 5'11", 207lbs

Ted Ligety:  5'11",  179lbs

Benjamin Raich:  6', 183lbs

 

 

 

 

 



 

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post

Ligety......................boom.    eggs cooked in EVOO i hope????? lol
 



 



EVOO is fine, but grass-fed butter, like Kerrygold, is much more nutritious.  Unless you are lactose intolerant, don't fear butter - it is healthful and delicious.  Josh Matta was right in his post above.  You need protein and good quality dietary fat to grow.  Clean sources of animal fat are best AND healthiest. 

 

Do avoid all industrial seed oils (AKA vegetable oil) like soy, corn, canola, etc - these are very bad for you.  This means avoiding fried restaurant foods and just about anything in a package. 

 

I know it's unreasonable to expect a 15 year old to be strict with this stuff (you're probably pretty much eating whatever your parents buy), but it's good to know what is ideal and then do the best you can.

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