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Can my wife use a youth racing ski?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

My wife borrowed my daughter's Elan Slalom skis (jr version with 7.5 max DIN).  She liked them.  She weighs 125, skis a 6 DIN and is PSIA level1.  Is there any down side to gettinhg her a set of Jr racing skis?

post #2 of 11

Probably OK if the skis are the FIS version and stiff enough to handle a small adult.  My wife skied on jr racing skis many years ago and loved the performance compared to an adult recreational ski of the era.  The downside of a slalom ski is that while it is quick turning and good on hard snow it is not very versatile otherwise.  What length is the ski and how tall is your wife?  Does she teach on a small hill with hard snow conditions?  Does she ski elsewhere?

 

My grandson skied on Volkl FIS jr slaloms at about the same weight until he had a growth spurt and needed adult skis. 

 

However there are many good carving type skis that are excellent choices for a teacher and better all around skis.

 

Bill

post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral View Post

Probably OK if the skis are the FIS version and stiff enough to handle a small adult. 



There are no "FIS" Jr skis despite what they print on them. There are only 2 real "FIS" slalom skis, 155 for ladies and 165cm for men. They are full-on race skis and generally more than what people are looking for.

 

Several companies, Rossi/Dynastar comes to mind do have 150cm "race stock" SL skis for teens (i.e J3s) or light adults. As well some companies also produce 155cm "Jr" skis. It all comes down to length and flex. Jr race skis will be stiffer than retail, adult will be stiffer than Jr, and FIS will be the stiffest of them all.

 

Another option is there are some very good "retail" or "consumer" race skis in different lengths (including 155/165) which include tween sizes of 150 and 160 and >165 that could be of interest.

 

 

All that being said, many 2nd year J4s and 1st year J3s are about 120-130lbs and use 145-150cm Jr race skis, so a lady of that weight range, looking for a strong (almost only) frontside carver could easily use a Jr race ski which is usually more economical than adult skis.

 

Alternatives can also be found in this thread http://www.epicski.com/t/109358/whats-becoming-of-the-frontside-ski

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

We ski the ice coast in the Pocono Mtns in PA and some out west each year.  I could do a junior GS ski as well.  Her other skis are 151 cm Atomic Cloud 7s so the sizing and radius is similar to the slalom skis. 

post #5 of 11

Downsides.......

 

Less versatile than all mountain carvers.

Very short for a 125# adult.

Redundant with a 151 carvish ski already in hand.

7.5 DIN bindings have weak housings and weak fwd pressure.

Said binding is a poor choice even if the DIN setting is 6.

 

Upside............

 

Cheap.

 

So......why in the world are you even considering this? What do you want to accomplish that can't be done as well on what she has?

 

SJ

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroGravity View Post



There are no "FIS" Jr skis despite what they print on them. There are only 2 real "FIS" slalom skis, 155 for ladies and 165cm for men. They are full-on race skis and generally more than what people are looking for.

 

Several companies, Rossi/Dynastar comes to mind do have 150cm "race stock" SL skis for teens (i.e J3s) or light adults. As well some companies also produce 155cm "Jr" skis. It all comes down to length and flex. Jr race skis will be stiffer than retail, adult will be stiffer than Jr, and FIS will be the stiffest of them all.

 

Another option is there are some very good "retail" or "consumer" race skis in different lengths (including 155/165) which include tween sizes of 150 and 160 and >165 that could be of interest.

 

 

All that being said, many 2nd year J4s and 1st year J3s are about 120-130lbs and use 145-150cm Jr race skis, so a lady of that weight range, looking for a strong (almost only) frontside carver could easily use a Jr race ski which is usually more economical than adult skis.

 

Alternatives can also be found in this thread http://www.epicski.com/t/109358/whats-becoming-of-the-frontside-ski


Well put Zero G.  As SJ has also pointed out several times junior race skis are not the same, only cheaper,  as the adult version.  The top sheet may look the same but that is the closest resemblance.  I suggest any lightweight adult thinking along these lines for a slalom ski looks for  a used 155 race stock (or consumer race) slalom instead.  It will stand up far better and offer better performance than the junior version as well as using an adult binding and plate.   You will also find that the used 155s are available pretty reasonably priced.  The 165s fetch significantly more used .

 

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

Downsides.......

 

Less versatile than all mountain carvers.

Very short for a 125# adult.

Redundant with a 151 carvish ski already in hand.

7.5 DIN bindings have weak housings and weak fwd pressure.

Said binding is a poor choice even if the DIN setting is 6.

 

Upside............

 

Cheap.

 

So......why in the world are you even considering this? What do you want to accomplish that can't be done as well on what she has?

 

SJ



+1

 

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

She liked them a lot better when she grabbed them off the rack while my daughter was in at lunch.   She thought they were a lot stiffer.  Maybe the Cloud 9 is more similar? 

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by handhdad View Post

She liked them a lot better when she grabbed them off the rack while my daughter was in at lunch.   She thought they were a lot stiffer.  Maybe the Cloud 9 is more similar? 



Liked them better why? What did they do better than what she has? Whatever that is, is can be accomplished with a higher level adult carver.

 

What is the goal for her skiing or terrain capabilities?

 

SJ

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

She is a a Level I and they are pushing her to get her Level II.  She is always centered on her skis and can do moguls and steeps.  She is transitioning from the old style with her knees locked together to the wider stance.  The slalom skis are tuned with a 0.5/3 degree edge, versus a 1/3 degree edge for the Cloud 7's.  She thought they were stiffer.  My wife and daughter have the same boot size, so it was easy to clip right in and go.  Open to other options and suggestions though.  She also needs to be able to move in them for lessons as well.  My daughter is concerned she'll never get them back and she'll be on the Cloud 7s.  Not that appealing for a retired J3 racer.   

post #11 of 11

Of course, the junior race skis is way better than an atomic cloud 7.  The junior race ski is stiffer, has more torsional rigidity and has a speed limit that's higher than your wife can run.  The Cloud 7 is holding your wife back.

 

That being said, 125 lbs is about the upper limit for a junior race ski.  I do agree she might be better off on a top-end carver or adult SL ski in a short length.

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