EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Law against Utah drink specials????
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Law against Utah drink specials????

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I was just surfing the net researching if there were any good happy hours out near The Midvale Fort Union area and found an article that says drink specials are outlawed in Utah... Could that be true? Snowbird seems to always be talking up specials on their website... Could it be one of those laws that just isn't enforced? Whatever the case it's a STUPID law.

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2081565,00.html
post #2 of 19

Apparently you've never heard the saying "Eat, drink, and be merry, for one day you may live in Utah"!  Utah has the most bizarre alcohol laws in the US.  It was thought that they would finally change some of the laws when they hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics.  Instead, they simply spent millions of dollars printing up multi-language brochures to "educate" their guests.  In Utah you cannot buy a "mixed" drink.  You have to buy the alcohol and mixer separately and mix it yourself.  You can also not just go into a bar.  You have to pay a fee and be "invited" by a member.  Even in Oregon you cannot advertise happy hour specials...  In Utah just be thankful if you can find alcohol and get served!

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

This won't be my first time in SLC... but its something I've never noticed before.

 

When I'm in town, I think I'll have to get a lot drunker than I normally might have, just to spite those moron politicians.

post #4 of 19

Yes, it is true, yes it is enforced. Plenty of happy hour deals  for food. Some vendors have found a way around the ban on special discount pricing law by offering drinks at regular prices that just happen to be very low and by only offering that  product during "happy hour".

post #5 of 19

I thought the membership thing was eliminated last year.  And we've had mixed drinks at the bar at Snowbasin with no problems for years.

post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtashbum View Post

Apparently you've never heard the saying "Eat, drink, and be merry, for one day you may live in Utah"!  Utah has the most bizarre alcohol laws in the US.  It was thought that they would finally change some of the laws when they hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics.  Instead, they simply spent millions of dollars printing up multi-language brochures to "educate" their guests.  In Utah you cannot buy a "mixed" drink.  You have to buy the alcohol and mixer separately and mix it yourself.  You can also not just go into a bar.  You have to pay a fee and be "invited" by a member.  Even in Oregon you cannot advertise happy hour specials...  In Utah just be thankful if you can find alcohol and get served!



Simply not all true.  Maybe years ago, but not today (at least in the dozens of bars and restaurants that I have been to in the last 5 years). 

Now I agree with you that Utah has the most bizarre alcohol laws in the US, however, what you have stated about mixed drinks sounds like 30 years ago.

post #7 of 19

Go to the source for the right answers...

 

 

http://abc.utah.gov/laws/law_residents.html

 

Quote:

Wine, Liquor, Flavored Malt Beverages, Beer, and Heavy Beer

  • Full liquor service is available in licensed restaurants, banquet and catering facilities, reception centers, airport lounges, and clubs. Patrons may order liquor by the drink, wine by the glass or bottle, and beer in bottles, cans and on draft. Packaged liquor, wine, and heavy beer (over 3.2%) are available in State Liquor Stores and Package Agencies.
  • In restaurants with full service liquor licenses, liquor, wine, flavored malt beverages, and heavy beer (over 3.2%) may be served from 11:30 AM to midnight. Beer (3.2%) is available from 11:30 AM to 1:00 AM. Patrons must be dining in the restaurant in order to be served an alcoholic beverage.  Patrons must be dining in order to be served an alcoholic beverage.
  • In restaurants with limited service liquor licenses, wine, and heavy beer (over 3.2%) may be served from 11:30 AM to midnight. Beer (3.2%) is available from 11:30 AM. to 1:00 AM. Limited restaurant licenses may not sell flavored malt beverages or distilled spirits.  Patrons must be dining in order to be served an alcoholic beverage.
  • Restaurants with beer only licenses:  Effective March 1, 2012, restaurants with a beer only license may sell beer (3.2%) beginning at 11:30 AM and ending at 1:00 AM. 
  • An on-premise banquet license allows the storage, sale, service, and consumption of liquor, wine, flavored malt beverages, heavy beer, and beer for contracted banquet activities on the premises of a hotel, resort facility, sports center, or convention center. It also allows for room service in hotels and resorts. Alcoholic beverages may be sold on any day from 10 AM until 1:00 AM.
  • A reception center license allows the storage, sale, service, and consumption of liquor, wine, heavey beer, and beer for banquet and event functions on the premises of small banquet and event venues that want to sell, offer for sale, or furnish alcohol on their premises.  Alcoholic beverages may be sold on any day from 10:00 AM until 1:00 AM.
  • In clubs, liquor, wine, flavored malt beverages, heavy beer, and beer may be served from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. Clubs sell alcoholic beverages with or without food, and patrons may be served at a bar or table. Many clubs provide live entertainment. There are four types of clubs; equity, fraternal, dining, and social. Dining and Social clubs are open to the public. Equity clubs (such as country clubs) and Fraternal or Patriotic clubs are for members and their guests.
  • In airport lounges, liquor, wine, flavored malt beverages, heavy beer, and beer may be served from 8:00 a.m. until 12 midnight. Alcoholic beverages may be sold with or without food, and patrons may be served at a bar or table. Airport lounges are located at the Salt Lake International Airport.
  • Packaged liquor, wine, and heavy beer 'to go' is sold at 44 full service state liquor stores. There are also more than 100 package agencies that offer a more modest selection of these products. Package agencies are often located in smaller cities and towns, and in hotels and resorts for customer convenience.
  • Utah offers a world class wine selection at three specialty wine stores located at: 255 South 300 East, 1863 East 7000 South, and 280 W Harris Ave in Salt Lake City. Several other state stores also offer expanded wine selections. Locate a store

Beer
Beer establishments sell beer to customers in a variety of venues. These include taverns, lounges, cabarets, nightclubs, cafes, bowling alleys, golf courses, etc. The hours for beer sales in these establishments are 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. Beer may be purchased without ordering food, and is sold on draft and in bottles and cans. Packaged beer is also available at supermarkets, grocery and convenience stores. The maximum alcohol content is 4.0% by volume (3.2% by weight) for beer sold in taverns, beer establishments, and stores."Taverns" are beer bars, parlors, lounges, cabarets, and nightclubs where the revenue from the sale of beer exceeds the revenue of the sale of food. Minors are not allowed on the premises of a tavern.

Single Event Permits
Single event permits are available from the Utah Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission for groups that want to sell liquor, wine, flavored malt beverages, beer, and heavy beer at temporary events. These are available to a bona fide partnership, corporation, limited liability company, political or religious organization, or incorporated association (including a recognized subordinate lodge, chapter or other local unit) that is conducting a civic or community enterprise or convention. The permit allows for the sale of alcoholic beverages to the general public, or to the organization's own invited guests for the duration of the event. The permit allows for cash bars and the sale of alcohol for fundraising purposes. Permits are issued by the commission once a month. Application must be made by the 10th of each month and the fee is $125.

Temporary Beer Permits
Temporary event permits for the sale of beer (3.2%) are issued by the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission for on-premise consumption at a temporary event. Permits are issued by the commission once a month. Application must be made by the 10th of each month and the fee is $100. This permit is in addition to any that are required by a city, town, or county in which the event is held.

Private Parties
Individuals and organizations hosting private social, business, or recreational events or functions are not required to obtain a permit from the state if the event is not open to the general public, and alcohol is provided to invited guests without cost.

Metered Dispensing
Utah law requires restaurants, clubs, on-premise banquet licensees, reception centers, and airport lounges to use a metered dispensing system that is calibrated to dispense no more than 1.5 ounces of primary liquor in a mixed drink. Secondary alcoholic flavorings may then be added to a mixed drink as the recipe requires, not to exceed a total of 2.5 ounces of spirituous liquor.

Wine Service
Restaurants (full and limited service), on-premise banquet licensees, reception centers, clubs, and airport lounges may serve wine by the glass (5 ounces) or by the bottle.

Brown Bagging
"Brown Bagging" is a term-of-art that refers to the practice of bringing alcoholic beverages into an establishment that is open to the public for consumption on the premises. This practice is generally prohibited, however there are three exceptions. 1) A person may bring bottled wines onto the premises of a full service, or limited service restaurant or a club liquor licensee (at the discretion of the licensee) and consume the wine. 2) Alcoholic beverages may be brought onto and consumed in limousines and charter busses under certain restrictions. 3) A person may bring onto any premises, have, and consume any alcoholic beverage at a privately-hosted event (private party) that is not open to the general public.

Take note of the red portion concerning mixed drinks.  They are available but there are restrictions. 

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtashbum View Post

Apparently you've never heard the saying "Eat, drink, and be merry, for one day you may live in Utah"!  Utah has the most bizarre alcohol laws in the US.  It was thought that they would finally change some of the laws when they hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics.  Instead, they simply spent millions of dollars printing up multi-language brochures to "educate" their guests.  In Utah you cannot buy a "mixed" drink.  You have to buy the alcohol and mixer separately and mix it yourself.  You can also not just go into a bar.  You have to pay a fee and be "invited" by a member.  Even in Oregon you cannot advertise happy hour specials...  In Utah just be thankful if you can find alcohol and get served!



They got rid of the 'private club' law a couple years ago. Even then, you never had to be "invited," you just had to pay like $5 and become a temporary member.

 

Looks like all your information was wrong.

 

Don't know why people (especially grown adults) constantly make a huge deal about Utah liquor laws. Yes it's more inconvenient than other places, but drinks are there if you want them. You want to party like a 22-year-old on spring break, go to Vegas, New Orleans, New York, etc. Or Whistler/Tahoe/Killington etc. for a ski version of that. You go to UT to ski.

post #9 of 19

The local breweries offer some great beers and after a long day of hard skiing I actually like the lower alcohol content of the draft beers.  My biggest complaint is the high cost of out-of-state microbrews but I prefer to drink local anyway.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by cstreu1026 View Post

The local breweries offer some great beers and after a long day of hard skiing I actually like the lower alcohol content of the draft beers.  My biggest complaint is the high cost of out-of-state microbrews but I prefer to drink local anyway.



The high cost of real beer in general is definitely my biggest complaint too. Warm beer that costs $1 or $2 per bottle no matter how many you buy is just a rip off. You can find wine and liquor for prices comparable to liquor stores in other states, but beer is in a league of its own (unless you want a limited selection of 3.2 grocery-store beer all the time). The only positive is that because you have to pay by the bottle anyway, you have a reason to build your own six/12 pack with all different types of beer.

post #11 of 19

I didn't think the price of Wasatch/Squatters brews like Devastator Doppelbock and Hop Rising were too high in the state stores compared what we pay in Ohio for similar beers.  On the other hand wine and liquor prices seemed a little lower which was a surprise.

post #12 of 19

I assume the Costco in SLC does not sell liquor, as they do in other states?

post #13 of 19

Costco does not sell liquor. I've been coming to Utah to ski for at least 15 years. I have had no significant problem in drinking alcohol. people make way too much of it. Whistler has some of the same laws. You buy your wine and liquor at province run stores which are closed Sundays and holidays. I never hear anyone whine about BC liquor laws. I often have great lunches at utah ski areas sometimes involving beer or wine (sometimes in greater quantities than necessary). Just plan ahead and buy your alcohol at the liquor store, drink beer at almost every ski resort or go to a restaurant at resort if you want wine. And by the way, I'm having a single malt scotch as I sit here in park city, so take what I say with a grain of salt.   

post #14 of 19

I second Maui Steve. I have been visiting SLC  to ski (oops, I meant work) for the last 14 years. I have never had any problems - getting any form of alcohol to buy or to drink at a restaurant. In my experience - the same bottle of wine is only about 5-10% more expensive in SLC than in the Bay Area - but 20%-40% more expensive in Whistler/Canada.

post #15 of 19

Agree with Marty re BC alcohol prices. My taste in wine has to decrease in quality when i visit Whistler due to onerous prices. Not sure if it's taxes, the US dollar or what. But it's expensive.  

post #16 of 19

Thanks for the information. Utah liquor laws seem similar to Canadian regulations in some ways.

 

The difference in price is the tax.

post #17 of 19

I'll agree that I've never had a problem getting a drink in SLC or PC but it can certainly be easy to run up against some weird rules.  A few years ago at the brewery at the top of the main drag in PC, they told us they had a limited selection of beers for draft and then some others (read: more interesting) that were only legally available in bottles.  It certainly would have been nice to do a tasting sampler of the interesting things.  While at the High West Distillery, a buddy ordered a whiskey flight and they could only serve two of the four samples at a time due to a prohibition on customers having more than two "drinks" in front of them at one time.  From what I understand the real problems are for the business owners that have all sorts of ridiculous and onerous regulations to follow. 

 

In any case, not a big deal because ultimately the skiing is great.

post #18 of 19
This country is stock loaded with crazy ass people. I like places where you know your crazy flavor coming in the door. Just play the game, it's half the fun of travel.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maui Steve View Post

 Not sure if it's taxes, the US dollar or what. But it's expensive.  

 

 

It must be tax, because even the BC wines are fairly high priced and some of the cheapest beers are US.

 


 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › Law against Utah drink specials????