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Vintage 70s skis: Ok to ski with?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hi guys. I've been bitten by the 70s ski bug (and early 80s!). I started skiing in the mid-70s and loved it. Quit after the 80s, then had went skiing in the past couple years but never found the enjoyment I had in the past. Well, last weekend I was out skiing and the "snow" was like a wet granular consistency (think slush puppy). I was not enjoying myself too much and felt that skiing is over for me now. Well, the temps dropped and things went more to a dry granular condition and my Olin Mark IV oranges came alive!! I had never really "let go" confidence-wise in the past few years, but I was on fire: I didn't anticipate ever having this feeling again! So now I'm back!! :D So my question is, is it worth buying vintage 70s ski that are in good condition, for medium-spirited skiing? My Olins did really well, and now I have my eye on a few models that I loved as a kid and couldn't afford. I would hate to have any ski disintegrate- is this a possibility with a nice, '75-85 pair of skis? I have my eyes on some Rossi ST's, different Olin models, a pair of "the ski"s. Are any of these still ok to ski on, especially "the ski" skis?

post #2 of 28
I have a pair of The Ski and I did just ski them a few weeks ago. Even after a tune and a run over the stone grinder they were ungodly slow. It is amazing how far the base materials have come over the years. To get out on any straight ski now is just pure novelty for me now.
post #3 of 28

I can't comment about the skis, but I would not at all recommend skiing on 40 year old bindings.

I got a pair of skis from the 1980s just to teach myself how to wax skis.  I wanted to try them out but many people strongly advised me against doing so, due to risk of injury from a binding failure.

post #4 of 28

Doesn't sound like much fun on a 70's ski......

post #5 of 28

Why don't you take some good lessons on some modern skis to figure it out?

And carry a rotary desk phone in a backpack for communicating with others.

post #6 of 28

If they have a good tune they'll be fine......you will need to replace the bindings if you want to be certain of retention or release tho....

post #7 of 28

I skied on a pair of Volkl P30 race carvers up until 6 or 7 years ago when I was finally shamed into getting some more up to date skis.  They were great skis and I could go really fast on them on superhard snow, but they were 185cm and I'm only 5'8".  I replaced them with 163cm skis and it was like night and  day they were so much easier to handle.  I got out the P30s last season and make a couple of runs on them.  They really weren't much fun.  All the skis I have now are a lot more fun to ski than than those old P30s.  If you want a carving ski demo whatever you can get your hands on, and try something shorter than the Olins.  And as someone alluded to, if you buy 20-30 year old skis you will need to replace the bindings because you won't find a shop that will touch them.

post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I skied on a pair of Volkl P30 race carvers up until 6 or 7 years ago when I was finally shamed into getting some more up to date skis.  They were great skis and I could go really fast on them on superhard snow, but they were 185cm and I'm only 5'8".  I replaced them with 163cm skis and it was like night and  day they were so much easier to handle.  I got out the P30s last season and make a couple of runs on them.  They really weren't much fun.  All the skis I have now are a lot more fun to ski than than those old P30s.  If you want a carving ski demo whatever you can get your hands on, and try something shorter than the Olins.  And as someone alluded to, if you buy 20-30 year old skis you will need to replace the bindings because you won't find a shop that will touch them.



Volkl RC SL P30.jpg

 

post #9 of 28

I laugh every time this topic comes up....."The new skis are so much more fun". If that is true then why were you "wasting your time" skiing 10, 20 or 30 years ago?

 

It's sliding on snow. The new skis do it, the old skis did it. If you want to try the old skis again (or still) great, go do it. If you don't, no one is forcing you too. I still like the old skis on eastern conditions. I like some of the new ones when it occasionally goes 3D and even in the Spring corn. It's all good.....

post #10 of 28

I saw a pair of Strato 102s in a thrift store today for ten bucks.  They had a version of looks I don't recall seeing before.  It has a FAT triangular toe piece and the typical turntable heel piece had an integrated brake.  I looked and pondered, where would I put them when I brought them home.  Realizing they would end up screwed to the fence after taking a few runs on them to free up space for the Gotomas I've been looking for I walked away from them.

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I saw a pair of Strato 102s in a thrift store today for ten bucks.  They had a version of looks I don't recall seeing before.  It has a FAT triangular toe piece and the typical turntable heel piece had an integrated brake.  I looked and pondered, where would I put them when I brought them home.  Realizing they would end up screwed to the fence after taking a few runs on them to free up space for the Gotomas I've been looking for I walked away from them.



These? (if so, nice upgrade!)

 

Look ZRa.jpg

 

post #12 of 28

^^Yep, that is what they had. One of the brakes looked pretty mangled.

post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thank you guys for your informative and funny posts. I haven't ever skied with a newer ski, and the classic skis work beautifully for me, plus I'm big into nostalgia. And, as of last night, I am a a new owner of "The Ski"!! This was known as the epitomy of skis when I was skiing in the 70s :D Thanks again everyone.. Kurt

post #14 of 28

I had the orange ones.smile.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



Volkl RC SL P30.jpg

 



 

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I skied on a pair of Volkl P30 race carvers up until 6 or 7 years ago when I was finally shamed into getting some more up to date skis.  They were great skis and I could go really fast on them on superhard snow, but they were 185cm and I'm only 5'8".  I replaced them with 163cm skis and it was like night and  day they were so much easier to handle.  I got out the P30s last season and make a couple of runs on them.  They really weren't much fun.  All the skis I have now are a lot more fun to ski than than those old P30s.  If you want a carving ski demo whatever you can get your hands on, and try something shorter than the Olins.  And as someone alluded to, if you buy 20-30 year old skis you will need to replace the bindings because you won't find a shop that will touch them.


I had the opposite experience last week.  I got out my old early 1980s Kästle Supe-g skis, complete with 30 year old ALL METAL bindings, and they were as fun as ever at laying down railroad tracks in medium to large radius turns.  True they required a little more attention to detail in tricky snow, but at what they were designed for, they were great.  You might want to inspect the bindings on those old skis carefully before you use them though.  The are 208 cm long; I weigh about 150 lbs.

 

post #16 of 28

Hey Ghost, have you checked out the Salamon Lab SG skis ScotSkier's selling in GearSwap?  They've got "Ghost" written all over them.  I picked up their little GSisters last year. 

 

 

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Hey Ghost, have you checked out the Salamon Lab SG skis ScotSkier's selling in GearSwap?  They've got "Ghost" written all over them.  I picked up their little GSisters last year. 

 

 

hijack.gif
 

Very tempting, but I can't afford to buy any skis right now.  I haven't tried Salomon Speed skis.  I really really like there super-quick scalpel-like short radius skis, and I can enjoy lighter skis from Fischer skis at the GS and SG,  but I'm more partial to a solider feel in a speed ski (despite my light weight), like the typical offerings from Atomic.  What are Salomon speed skis like?

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

hijack.gif
 What are Salomon speed skis like?



BEEFY, especially with the plate.  You'd really like the SGs.   And Scotty isn't charging much at all for them, really just passing them on to whoever will use them. 

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mango View Post

Hi guys. I've been bitten by the 70s ski bug (and early 80s!). I started skiing in the mid-70s and loved it. Quit after the 80s, then had went skiing in the past couple years but never found the enjoyment I had in the past. Well, last weekend I was out skiing and the "snow" was like a wet granular consistency (think slush puppy). I was not enjoying myself too much and felt that skiing is over for me now. Well, the temps dropped and things went more to a dry granular condition and my Olin Mark IV oranges came alive!! I had never really "let go" confidence-wise in the past few years, but I was on fire: I didn't anticipate ever having this feeling again! So now I'm back!! :D So my question is, is it worth buying vintage 70s ski that are in good condition, for medium-spirited skiing? My Olins did really well, and now I have my eye on a few models that I loved as a kid and couldn't afford. I would hate to have any ski disintegrate- is this a possibility with a nice, '75-85 pair of skis? I have my eyes on some Rossi ST's, different Olin models, a pair of "the ski"s. Are any of these still ok to ski on, especially "the ski" skis?



you go mango.

if that's what floats your boat, then who's to say no?

'disintegrate', well some might, but not likely gonna cause more than some inconvenience...

not likely gonna be worse than the 4 pr of CPM TIs I blew up in 4 wks, or the 5 pr of atonics I de-lamed...

wraps like K2/some The Ski, Dynamics seemed to hold up very nicely - I took my '76 Vr17s out earlier this year and had a fun time.

Is it worth buying really old skis from 70's and 80's?  depends one what you're willing to pay and whether you can do the remount/adjustment.

certainly there's not going to be any shop which will work on them...

if you'd like to ski that old crappage of your dreams, who's to say not to?

old skis are not like guitars or violins, they generally don;t get better with age.

report back with your adventures

post #20 of 28

Just converted to brand new GS shaped race skis from late '80s 205 GS race skis.  Still like to old skis, love the new.  You gotta try it (I'd go on the high performance scale when looking at skis, your used to working skis), and give it a couple of days to get the new technique (take a couple of lessons if need), it'll be the best thing you did.

I still ski the old to show off because I can, the new because it makes it fun to ski yahoo.gif even though they are full blown race ski.

 

As to Bindings, you either know, maintain, test and trust them or you don't.  If you have to think, ask, have someone else look at them, don't !! While I ski some old bindings (and skis), I wouldn't recommend it to anyone, this is a do at your own risk of life and limb (this is for the stupid.....wait I do that....what I'm I saying about myself here?)

 

BTW I just recieved a set of never skied 190 Volant FX2 skis (cira 1989-1990) with Geze Bindings (yes they look like the KNEE bindings, no heel pivot, toes look different). For those that don't know, they were a stainless steel cap ski, thought to be the best technology until skied in the bumps (don't take well to excessive tip bending) which greatly shortened the length of the ski and permantly increased the length of the tip by folding ROTF.gif.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #21 of 28

So I would get chastised for skiing these?  I might make a video and report back.

 

 

Left: Fischer President 215cm (circa 1967) Right: Volant Karve 175cm (1995)

P2110002.jpg

post #22 of 28



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thejunkman View Post

So I would get chastised for skiing these?  I might make a video and report back.

 

 

Left: Fischer President 215cm (circa 1967) Right: Volant Karve 175cm (1995)

P2110002.jpg



Not the Fischer's, those look sweet biggrin.gif

 

I'd ski'um

post #23 of 28

Id ski those fischers in a heart beat.  definatly make sure the bases are flat.  (I've noticed a lot of the old skis that have sat for years are very concave.)  wax then up,  ensure that the bindings are functioning and set properly and  have some fun.  I'd love to see a video too.

 

Royal

post #24 of 28

I would ski those Fischers.

I would ski those Volants.

I would NOT flatten the bases.

I would leave them concave, ski faster and just carve arc-2-arc on them.

post #25 of 28

Very handsome skis, slalom model. What the Japanese did with cameras, motorcycles, etc. by building very high quality, they didn't do with skis. These just aren't no Rossignols.SANY0045.JPG

post #26 of 28

When I grew up one of the first skis I remember skiing was a set of Elan Gard 180 (Part of the first shaped ski go around earlier Earlier Mid '70s, I was about 9-10 and skiing 180's), The next set were my moms Diawa 195s at about 12 (mount my first brakes aftermarket, ski were from Japan and ugly orange), then my dad Blizzard Anstiener (Yellow) 210's at about 14-15, broke them skiing in Sutton and Got my first set of full blown GS race skis Blizzard Firebird Thermo RS 203's in  I was 16 in 1981 Sutton Quebec.  I can still rember the owner of the shop saying " son, these ski go fastest on a little bit edge, not in a straight line"....he was right and those are still words I live by. (Still have those skis, most likely one of favourite skis till now,  The Dynastar Speed Course WC are doing the same for me 30 years later), they took me up level two levels of skiing in several days.  They are still in great condition.

 

I've got to take some pictures and post them.

 

post #27 of 28

Well I am taking those Fischers up to WP this weekend.  Those are my dads downhill skis (also has an identical pair in 223cm) as this model was more of a GS type ski I believe.  They are in great shape and were well taken care of.  Last time I skied these was when I was about 15 and I was skiing those OLIN Mark I in 160cm on the wall (they are heavily torn up with numerous core shots) shortly there after is when I got the Volants and I have always kept them in good shape as well but after 15 years the edges are almost gone.

 

Here is my dad in '68 on those very Fischer Presidents

 

 

DadSkiing.jpg

post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. I intend on skiing on the k2 cheeseburgers and "The Ski"s. I skied last week on my Olin Mark IVs and didn't touch the bindings since recieving them. They seemed solid to me, so I went for it and had a great time. I'll be more careful in the future, tho. Regards, Kurt
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