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Releasing Your inner expert

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

A recent e-mail from a friend of mine has an interesting segment that I thought would make an interesting topic here at EPICSKI. The context is not skiing per se (she's a life coach) but I saw a few ideas that relate very well to the idea of teaching / learning a sport and how important it is to embrace change. After all isn't change what we "sell" to our students? I also wonder how many of us lose that wide eyed enthusiasm once we reach a particular level in our own skiing and teaching. Which brings up another interesting point. Do our students pick up on that when we are encouraging them to adopt that strong will to make changes? What do our actions communicate? How about our teaching styles? Do we preach a rigid form instead and suggest changes based solely on that particular style of skiing? How often do we step back out of the spotlight and create a workshop environment where we learn as much as our students? I could go on and on about this but I would rather share the following quote and solicit from the entire membership their experiences (both good and bad) as it relates to your learning path and the people who have helped you along the way. Thanks in advance for your posts.

JASP

 

 

"I find that when I follow the energy and allow it to be okay and let go of the judgment of how I think I 'should' be or what I think I 'should' do then it all works out. When I resist change that is when I seem to experience more struggle and strife.

 

Notice what changes you are resisting. In what area of your life is there blockage? What needs to happen to move forward?

 

We create from our known grooves and patterning. What if you could shift those patterns and create from an empowering place? How will you be when you are free of those old limitations and conditioning?"

 

 

post #2 of 17

And change, of course, rarely feels "right" when first attempted, either in skiing or in life.

 

For skiing, what fundamental form do we generally try to encourage? I might suggest that release is a major component. And as in life, release often feels risky to skiers, which may be one of several reasons why stemming and/or rotary push-off moves are so common.

 

Quote:

How about our teaching styles? Do we preach a rigid form instead and suggest changes based solely on that particular style of skiing?

 

Does our teaching style dictate a style of skiing? Our skiing will, I believe, have common effective fundamentals applicable to many situations and styles, but our teaching, while a reflection of ourselves, needs to also reflect the student.

 

However much we know about skiing, we don't know what the student knows, or thinks s/he knows. We can learn from that. Finding out what the student knows or believes will give us more tools than just what we get from the observed movements (or observed blockages).

 

Sometimes, we can teach by asking questions.

post #3 of 17
While appropriate change may feel unfamiliar, it still should feel better, even if in an unexplainable way. If it feels worse, maybe some intermediate phase should be investigated. There's a sense of freedom that comes with adopting a better way.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

While appropriate change may feel unfamiliar, it still should feel better, even if in an unexplainable way. If it feels worse, maybe some intermediate phase should be investigated. There's a sense of freedom that comes with adopting a better way.


change does not always feel good. Embrace the new untill its feels better. If it aint strange you aint makin a change.

post #5 of 17

By the title of this thread, I thought is was going to be about "releasing" to find the expert in all of us.  Releasing our turns rather than stemming or rotating to initiate a new turn.  Ah well, could've been a great discussion.

 

This quote could read:

 

"I find that when I follow the energy and allow it to be okay and let go of the TURN and how I think I 'should' be or what I think I 'should' do then it all works out. When I resist change IN DIRECTION that is when I seem to experience more struggle and strife.

 

Notice what changes you are resisting. In what area of your TURN is there blockage? What needs to happen to move forward?

 

Sorry, just a little side track....carry on!

 
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

Bud you got it. There are so many levels to the title. Facing fears isn't easy but if we are asking our students to do that, how successful are we going to be if we don't approach a lesson as an opportunity for us to take a leap of faith?

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post



change does not always feel good. Embrace the new untill its feels better. If it aint strange you aint makin a change.



I agree completely! New movements might feel weird strange goofy awkward and wrong.

post #8 of 17

My teaching this year has changed in profound ways.  I went from  a more technique oriented approach to a more whole person body and mind approach.  I am looking as much for a students mind to be in the game as much as anything else.  I use simple effective concepts and suggestions to achieve a change in intent.  I then simply create situations that will inevitably lead the student to discover for themselves through their own awareness a path that leads towards their goals.  I see myself more as a guide or mentor and not so much as a teacher.

 

I now use this same approach to lead other instructors to examine their own teaching instead of offering a suggested change.    

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

 In what area of your life is there blockage? What needs to happen to move forward?

 


Never ask anyone over 50 this question!

 

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

 

"I find that when I follow the energy and allow it to be okay and let go of the judgment of how I think I 'should' be or what I think I 'should' do then it all works out. When I resist change that is when I seem to experience more struggle and strife.

 

 


Not all change is good. Some people/corporations adopt "change is good" as a mantra. Some times this is needed in order to adopt positive changes. Some times it makes no difference and is not worth resisting. Some times it allows bad ideas to move forward. People need to recognize the difference between attitude being a block for beneficial change and attitude being a block for critical thinking. This is hard. It's even harder for instructors to recognize in their students because it seems to be easier.

 

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Do we preach a rigid form instead and suggest changes based solely on that particular style of skiing? 

 

So many of my students come to lessons wanting to buy "a fix" or a "better" turn. So many of my lessons are attempts to sell "options" instead of fixes. This was a common theme in the clinics I taught this year. Don't take the common definition of Movement Analysis (detection and correction) too literally. While the alliteration helps with understanding, it's better to think of change versus correction.

 

(if there is a ski teaching hell, I will surely go there for this...)

At my resort we get a lot of type A day trippers from DC. If their primary goal for skiing is to get some exercise and their yardstick for efficiency is how long it takes to get exhausted, then instead of fixing their skidding on the blue runs we could introduce them to power wedging a mogul run! (feel the burn !?)

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

(if there is a ski teaching hell, I will surely go there for this...)

At my resort we get a lot of type A day trippers from DC. If their primary goal for skiing is to get some exercise and their yardstick for efficiency is how long it takes to get exhausted, then instead of fixing their skidding on the blue runs we could introduce them to power wedging a mogul run! (feel the burn !?)


LOL!

 

Last weekend I was following some 10yo. He was locked in a power wedge but seemed utterly fearless. As the trail steepened and started bumping up a bit I figured he'd either crash or dial it back some.

 

No way. He kept right on wedge-blasting straight down the fall line, bumps be d****d, at the same brisk speed I was travelling in a more approved style. He kept moving so fast I couldn't have passed him without switching into race mode.

 

I followed this kid for ~1,300' vertical and not once did he change the angle of his wedge or turn out of the fall line. If I tried that my legs would fall off, lol. The kid was no skilled skier but he's already a Type A... I've never seen more determination.
 

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Do our students pick up on that when we are encouraging them to adopt that strong will to make changes? What do our actions communicate? 

 

 


My actions depend on my assessment of the student. Many students (mostly kids, but some adults too) are in lessons against their better judgment. For these people, it's our job to help them find their motivation and feed it. Very few understand what we are doing when we do this, but some do. Most of the students I see come with expectations for results from the lesson. For these people I rarely have to work on strong will to make change. Here the challenge is to raise expectations for the level of change possible in the future.

 

It irks me to see students revert to old movements once the lesson is over. Some people may mistake this as lacking a will to change.. I view this simply as a failure to teach effectively (of which managing student will is only a part).

 

The strongest action is to demonstrate fun. 

 

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

I agree completely! New movements might feel weird strange goofy awkward and wrong.

Same with a golf swing. And you make changes at the range, not on the course!

In skiing you have to practice the new moves a lot, on simple terrain, before they feel even remotely useful.

This should tell us something about the difference between what we feel about our skiing, and what it actually is ...and could be. (I did some video last Sunday which reminded me of this.)

It pays to listen to your skis. The new, awkward-feeling move generally results in the skis saying "yes, that's what I want!" and you have to pay attention to them!
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

Blockage over 50? Eat more salads...nonono2.gif

The Rusty, lasting change comes when old movement patterns are perceived as less effective and less reliable. Leading a student to that epiphany sometimes means setting them up for failure using their old habits. Then they are usually quite open to changing to something that does work in that situation. Even then you can only lead the horse to water...

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

 ...Even then you can only lead the horse to water...



Then there's the odd case of the student recognizing the new movement pattern works better, being able to demonstrate it when not under stress, and then reverting to it either without knowing, or worse, having it come back under stress and not being able to do anything about it.  The brain is a funny, mule-headed thing. 

 

post #17 of 17

Collective ski technique is impulsive, self- generating, self-sustaining & self- reversing. Cycles apply to skiing. The deepest reason for change in skiing is "its time"

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