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Can Kick wax or even Klister be used on alpine skis as a speed retardant?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

This is a serious thread.

 

Just wondering if kick wax or klister can be used on the bases of alpine skis as a speed retardant.  Ok, maybe klister is excessive and would mess up the bases, but how about kick wax?

post #2 of 28

The simple question is why? Need some context here. 

post #3 of 28

vit.. nice one

 

post #4 of 28

For beginners? I've found that leaving storage wax on (without scraping) does an admirable job of keeping speed down. Plus, all you have to do is give the skis a scrape and a brush and they'll be fast again. XC ski wax is a PITA to get off.

post #5 of 28

Maybe it could, but flatter terrain would work better. Teaching someone who is on really slow skis sucks. The problem is, you are trying to teach them how to turn and stop, and if they can't move, that's gonna be hard.

post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatlandr View Post

For beginners? I've found that leaving storage wax on (without scraping) does an admirable job of keeping speed down. Plus, all you have to do is give the skis a scrape and a brush and they'll be fast again. XC ski wax is a PITA to get off.



first with beginner its easy to get them to turn and stop on fast skis not slow skis. 

 

VS cna I ask why? for anyone this is a bad idea. the solution as epic says is easier terrain not slower skis and I can not believe I made a "serious" reply to your 'serious" thread. 

post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post



first with beginner its easy to get them to turn and stop on fast skis not slow skis. 

 

VS cna I ask why? for anyone this is a bad idea. the solution as epic says is easier terrain not slower skis and I can not believe I made a "serious" reply to your 'serious" thread. 


JM, can I ask why?
 

 

post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 

Why?

 

The possibilities are endless, guys.

 

 

I was thinking this might make the bumps go better for me, just to build confidence.

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Why?

 

The possibilities are endless, guys.

 

 

I was thinking this might make the bumps go better for me, just to build confidence.



it will not trust me. I was out skiing on pair of un waxxed demo skis and they felt like I couldnt not turn anywhere and therefore was going to fast. After waxxing I could control my speed at will.

 

Fast skis are easy skis to ski on. There is no serious debating this.

 

speed control is though turn shape and or skidding, and for the real experts pressure control with maybe a blocking pole plant thrown in some of the time. 

 

 

post #10 of 28

Wanna go slower? Change terrain:

 

JAP_8807.jpg

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Ok, maybe klister is excessive and would mess up the bases



well, at least you do already have a blowtorch.

post #12 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Why?

 

The possibilities are endless, guys.

 

 

I was thinking this might make the bumps go better for me, just to build confidence.


It's a bad idea because speed control is acquired through turn shape, not putting sticky wax on your skis.

post #13 of 28

I say do it! its skiing try new things let us know how it goes! 

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Why?

 

The possibilities are endless, guys.

 

 

I was thinking this might make the bumps go better for me, just to build confidence.


Just ski bumps and repeat. A lot. If you're confidence is shot to the point you're going to slow down your skis with anything other than turning technique, there's most likely not much anyone here can help you with. Boots that fit help a lot!

 

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


. Boots that fit help a lot!

 



and we certainly can not help with that! 

post #16 of 28

Find some bump runs that aren't as steep if thats what you want to use it for, as said sticky wax on skis makes them difficult to turn, which is kind of the point of bumps...

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Why?

 

The possibilities are endless, guys.

 

 

I was thinking this might make the bumps go better for me, just to build confidence.


The secret to learning to ski bumps slowly is learning to ski the slow line and going uphill at every opportunity (and there's no shortage of uphill possibilities in bump runs).  Being able to go uphill at will relies on being able to control ski pressure (i.e., foot squirts).  Being able to foot-squirt without feeling like your skis are stuck is made hella easier if your skis are waxed.

 

 

post #18 of 28

I hate to bring this back, but VS, what you are looking for is RaxSkis,  When you are around here long enough, I can honestly say I've seen everything now....

 

 



 

Here is the link to the serious review of the Rax http://www.epicski.com/t/68483/raxski-1-review

 

Good luck in your quest, whatever it is.

post #19 of 28

VS, I think there is a common thread connecting many of your questions and you keep getting the answer that, unfortunately, there really really is no substitute for hard work and learning proper technique. But I still get a laugh out of the rant where you blamed your tight underwear for restricting your range of motion... it was a real classic.

post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

Bumps for me are like the Dance Dance revolution video game... too much info coming at you too fast, and the necessary fast-twitch jerky muscle activity required.

 

Just like anything else, if you learn going slow, you can learn the motions.

 

 

Due to the nature of moguls, they don't have them on runs flat enough to go slow, IMO

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post


Due to the nature of moguls, they don't have them on runs flat enough to go slow, IMO

 

Green runs would get moguls if they left them ungroomed.

 

Wait till the snow gets slushy and ski your moguls then, it slows things down a good bit and also softens them up.

 

 

post #22 of 28

Just stop trying to carve the moguls arc-2-arc.  You can ski sideways as slow as you like. 

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Bumps for me are like the Dance Dance revolution video game... too much info coming at you too fast, and the necessary fast-twitch jerky muscle activity required.

 

Just like anything else, if you learn going slow, you can learn the motions.

 

 


 Kids learn to ski bumps by just doing it a lot. So should you. Let yourself be a kid and don't forget to laugh when you fall. It's important.Seriously, no shame and slowing it down and really work on turn shape. For fun, one of my favorite skiers slowing things way down and dialing it in:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nvvj57oIPIE

 

Not bumps, but you get the idea. I'd say it's a safe bet that she'd deal with bumps just fine as well.

 

 

 

post #24 of 28

7 Springs in South central PA had a nice setup of a green trail with little bumps that was good for training/learning. I don't know if they have this setup this year but you might want to check.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

This is a serious thread.

 

Just wondering if kick wax or klister can be used on the bases of alpine skis as a speed retardant.  Ok, maybe klister is excessive and would mess up the bases, but how about kick wax?



 Got ahold of your Pacesetter's skis, did you?

 

post #26 of 28

Many years ago I had a first date with a beautiful young woman.  We went cross country skiing. We started up a narrow road--but by the time we were heading back the road was frozen solid and it was clear my date had no way to control her speed.  I klistered her skis (the only time I ever used the stuff)--worked like a charm.  My wife (not the date in uestion) is sitting next to me so I can say more.

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post[....] But I still get a laugh out of the rant where you blamed your tight underwear for restricting your range of motion... it was a real classic.


LOL....This reminds me of a favourite passage in Mike Wilson's masterful book, "Right on the Edge of Crazy"....

 

All right, he [AJ Kitt] told himself.  It's just one race.  These things happen in downhill, and you have to accept them.  He got up, skied through the next gate, then did a daffy -- a sort of airborne split -- off the jump.  At least he could say he went out in style.

 

In the finish, AJ was approached by Chip and Pepper, smooth talking, long-haired twin brothers who hosted a TV show for hipsters.  [...]  The twins, bearing microphones, got on either side of AJ, and the camera rolled.  Here is a transcript of the interview:

 

CHIP:  "So what happened?"

AJ: "Well...."

PEPPER:  "Underwear too tight?"

 

post #28 of 28

Vitamin Ski has a valid question. Attacking bumps in slow sticky snow is a lot more fun than jetting down an ever tightening obstacle course. Yesterday's afternoon bumps were right in the skillset while the same bumps the next morning are too fast. I have often wondered about klister. Instead I adjust my style and skid a lot more. But if klister works...

Eric

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