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post #31 of 43

try ART therapy.  very effective.

post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidding View Post

Yes, I have made progress.  Thanks for asking.  Coincidentally, I have noticed the greatest improvement in the last 2 weeks.  Why?  I am not sure.  Maybe it is an early Christmas present.  I have tried many of the suggestions presented.

 

If there is a link to the foot/tripod article, I would be interested in reading it.

 

 

 

Sounds great!

 

Here's one article:

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/the-foot-and-its-role-in-skiing-by-david-macphail

post #33 of 43

I got PF from an overuse injury (I have a treadmill desk and got carried away with it trying to break all my records), so I've been missing this great year of skiing. Then today I finally went anyway, and no pain in my foot! Amazing. Not going to miss another day this season.

post #34 of 43
Welcome Epicski Marilyn!
post #35 of 43
Hard to believe doctors still give cortisone injections after all the research that shows it weakens tendons and ligaments. Dont do it.
I had pf for about 5 years, tried most of the stuff mentored above and some helped dsome but the only thing that cured it was PRP injections.
Incidentally, they also cured tendonitis in my elbow.

Lots of info on the web.
post #36 of 43

I always found this helpful. Not hard to do, and can be done throughout the day, even at work (usually):

 

http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/ortho/foot-ankle/Plantar-Fasciitis-Heel-Spur-Treatments.cfm

 

Good luck!

Kitty

post #37 of 43
Stretching calf muscles multiple times a day really helped me.

Rolfing also helped tremendously.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

Hard to believe doctors still give cortisone injections after all the research that shows it weakens tendons and ligaments. Dont do it.
I had pf for about 5 years, tried most of the stuff mentored above and some helped dsome but the only thing that cured it was PRP injections.
Incidentally, they also cured tendonitis in my elbow.

Lots of info on the web.

 

I believe it's a temporary weakening, no? My understanding is that if you go the cortisone route (and it should be after trying more conservative options in my opinion), that you don't want to do it more than twice a year to the same tissue, and you should be conservative with activities for a few days post-injection. Has research come out recently that says otherwise? I ask as I think I might not be up to date. 

 

Elsbeth

post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

Hard to believe doctors still give cortisone injections after all the research that shows it weakens tendons and ligaments. Dont do it.
I had pf for about 5 years, tried most of the stuff mentored above and some helped dsome but the only thing that cured it was PRP injections.
Incidentally, they also cured tendonitis in my elbow.

Lots of info on the web.
Cortisone has its place as does PRP.
Both are effective if done properly. And cortisone won't "weaken" your ligaments and tendons as you seem to imply here. You won't rapture your PF after a shot. Which in some cases would actually be a good thing...
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by evaino View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

Hard to believe doctors still give cortisone injections after all the research that shows it weakens tendons and ligaments. Dont do it.

I had pf for about 5 years, tried most of the stuff mentored above and some helped dsome but the only thing that cured it was PRP injections.

Incidentally, they also cured tendonitis in my elbow.


Lots of info on the web.

I believe it's a temporary weakening, no? My understanding is that if you go the cortisone route (and it should be after trying more conservative options in my opinion), that you don't want to do it more than twice a year to the same tissue, and you should be conservative with activities for a few days post-injection. Has research come out recently that says otherwise? I ask as I think I might not be up to date. 

Elsbeth
Had a player play in a match 2 days post injection in the knee. No problems whatsoever.
Again, "cortisone" shots are not all the same and they have their time and place. If done right there is no particular issue
post #41 of 43
I could be wrong about the cortisone effects long term, but read research on prp vs cortisone for PF. Pain relief with cortisone is for 6 months or so, prp seems to be more permanent.
post #42 of 43
I think all the possible cures have been outlined here. Personally a couple physio sessions and follow up exercises did it for me. Took about three weeks to disappear. More importantly is remove what caused the PF. I play year round soccer on turf fields and found it started and got worse as I played more. Could barely stand in the AM, and even sitting out for a few weeks didn't improve it a heck of alot (too much inflamation, too long). Cause? Poorly fitting boots, with no real arch support basically like a repetitive strain injury. Solution, better fitting boots, and some expert help with inserts. The OP mentionned golfing and his PF, I would suggest golf shoes maybe don't provide alot of support when walking 18 holes several times a week.
post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

I could be wrong about the cortisone effects long term, but read research on prp vs cortisone for PF. Pain relief with cortisone is for 6 months or so, prp seems to be more permanent.
PRP and cortisone are quite different concepts. I'm not trying to say that cortisone is always the best, rather that both are useful even if in different scenarios. Lots of things come into play when choosing a therapy, including health insurance, cost of therapy, stage of the injury, etc. 😉
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