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Looking for Ideas on Where to Move Out West

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Finally doing something I always wantd to do which is go out west.  Have a good job working from home which allows me this opportunity.  Huge outdoorsman so love hiking, camping, skiing, backpacking, climbing, etc...unfortunately grew up on Georgia and that is all I know (outside of summer and winter vacations out west).

 

Looking for decent rent for two bedroom (around 1200 - 1400) in fact would not mind something off the beaten path like a cabin in the woods, dont need a lot of nightlife, but a small town would be good enough with at least one bar:).  Wanting to take advantage of the outdoor activities and the beauty of the west.  Don't necessarily need to be on a scene.

 

Any help appreciated.  Thanks!

post #2 of 25

Sandpoint, ID

post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by spknmike View Post

Sandpoint, ID


Yes, Sandpoint is the first area that came to mind.  But only because I could never imagine living in a land-locked state that didn't have a large body of water.  Sandpoint fits that bill.

Check out the area on this site http://www.sandpointonline.com/.  It even has a nice real estate section.


 

 

post #4 of 25

Mammoth area? There are SO many options. Can you narrow it down at all?

post #5 of 25
There's a huge amount of hiking, climbing, mountain biking, skiing and even a little sailing available in the Summit County, CO area. Look for rentals in Frisco/Silverthorne/Dillon to be in the center of all the variety of activities. Year-around rentals commonly start with either the beginning or end of the ski season.
post #6 of 25

Ouray, CO.

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the direction...I hate being so vague but all I know is ready to move!

post #8 of 25

Mammoth or Tahoe, then. That way, if you need your ocean fix, you can get it! :D

post #9 of 25

The only way to answer that one is a big road trip. When the slipper fits, you'll know.

post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

The only way to answer that one is a big road trip. When the slipper fits, you'll know.



+1

 

There are literally dozens of places in the west that can offer you hiking, camping, skiing, backpacking, climbing, etc., but only you can decide which one is "THE" place.

post #11 of 25

Check out "best towns to live in" issues of magazines. Outside has a good list that I think it publishes every year. Ski magazines have them sometimes. Backpacker has had them. Nat Geo. Pretty much pick your favorite activity, find the magazine(s) that covers it and google 'X magazine: best towns'. Then cross check with other activities. The list you gave are pretty much all the most general possible activities out there. Pretty much any ski town in the Rockies/Cascades/Sierras will offer hiking, camping, backpacking and climbing.

 

You'd be better off narrowing it down to a couple places and then hitting forums to ask questions. At this point all you're going to get is list of where everyone lives or likes to visit - not much more helpful than looking at a map.

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by lfmlyons View Post

Finally doing something I always wantd to do which is go out west.  Have a good job working from home which allows me this opportunity.  Huge outdoorsman so love hiking, camping, skiing, backpacking, climbing, etc...unfortunately grew up on Georgia and that is all I know (outside of summer and winter vacations out west).

 

Looking for decent rent for two bedroom (around 1200 - 1400) in fact would not mind something off the beaten path like a cabin in the woods, dont need a lot of nightlife, but a small town would be good enough with at least one bar:).  Wanting to take advantage of the outdoor activities and the beauty of the west.  Don't necessarily need to be on a scene.

 

Any help appreciated.  Thanks!

 

Just about any place you pick in a mountainous region "out west" will offer all of what you want in terms of hiking, camping, skiing, backpacking, and climbing. And I can't imagine not being able to find reasonable accommodations for $1400 a month anywhere.

 

I wouldn't go where people on the internet tell me to go or where a magazine editor  tells me to live. I would live where I want to live. But if you don't care then maybe it doesn't matter.

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by tromano - 2/16/12 at 5:25am
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by spknmike View Post

Sandpoint, ID


Ditto to this.....but I'm biased, since I now live in the area.

 

Some have suggested some sort of exploratory road trip, and if your schedule allows it, that's a great idea.

Starting about 3-4 years before I planned to retire, I started taking ski trips specifically to places that I thought might make for a good place to live once retired.  The few I liked best I revisited in summer, and I eventually ended up in the Sandpoint area.  There are a few places I might enjoy skiing a bit more, but Sandpoint had the best overall combination of things I was looking for, many of which were similar to the things you cited.

 

So, figure out a half-dozen or so factors that are of high importance to you, research and visit those places that seem to fit the bill best for those criteria, narrow them down to 2 or 3 finalists, sleep on it, and pull the trigger on one.  Summit Co., Tahoe, and SLC area are obvious contenders, and you may well end up in one of those areas, but don't overlook also considering places in Washington, New Mexico, Montana....and I would obviously suggest Sandpoint also.  smile.gif

 

As pointed out already, outdoor-oriented magazines often have best town for various activities/lifestyle lists, and a really fun and potentially helpful website I found is findyourspot.com.  It asks a ton of questions about your interests and priorities, and it then provides a list of 20 or so possible places that may be a good match for you along with info and vital stats of each place like weather, COL, etc.  It also might give you ideas about places to check out.

 

In any case, Good Luck with the journey!

 

post #14 of 25

I'd say lose the corporate mags with their lists and go on a road trip.  A lot of those places are filled with what I like to call "amenity parasites"....you'll know the vibe of a place when you hang there for a bit. Don't be fooled by pretty pictures, pretty people & glitz...some of those places are hell to actually live in.

 

I think you'll find some cool little places in Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, & Oregon.  Also, consider what you might do if your work-from-home gig dries up.  Regional Airport access might be a consideration too.

 

What a fun road you have ahead of you!

post #15 of 25

Bend, OR

Hood River, OR

Sandpoint, ID

Whitefish, MT  (from what I've heard)

 

If I were doing the same mental exercise, I'd have to consider all of the aforementioned factors, plus suitability for gardening (a must for my girlfriend) and decent chai house (a must for me).    

post #16 of 25

I entered into the same process early last year.  My requirements were a bit different from yours in that I already lived in a very small mountain town out west and wanted something a bit bigger and more diverse.  But I considered all the places people have listed here plus some others.  Here was my list:

 

Bend, OR

Sandpoint, ID

Sun Valley/Ketchum/Hailey, ID

Boise, ID

Driggs/Tetonia, ID

Whitefish, MT

Bozeman, MT

Missoula, MT

Jackson, WY

Steamboat Springs, CO

Eagle, CO

Durango, CO

Telluride, CO

Carbondale, CO

Crested Butte, CO

Park City, UT

Ogden, UT

 

You might also consider:

 

Pagosa Springs, CO

Taos, NM

 

I ended up choosing Park City.  One of my main issues was what I would do if my work from home gig fell apart.  I did not want to have to move again (well my family didn't want to have to move again).  So access to significant employment opportunities was a big thing for me and led me to cross places like Telluride and Taos and a few others off the list.

 

post #17 of 25



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lfmlyons View Post

and the beauty of the west

Keying on just that one thought: maybe Jackson, WY.  Then go search for Bob Peters threadsdrool.gif

post #18 of 25

It's hard to answer this without a little more guidance... some things to think about:

 

- It sounds like you're ok with a small town, but are you against a bigger town?

- Do you need to be a 10-15 min drive from resort skiing, or are you cool being a 1-2 hour drive from a resort if you have the mountains + backcountry skiing in your backyard?

- What do you do, and do you want to be somewhere where you'll have at least a few options in that field if your work at home deal falls through?

- Do you care if the towns in question are particularly conservative/liberal?

- Do you care about having easy access to a bigger airport or being near a bigger population center?

 

In summary: moving out west is awesome. :) You'll find somewhere you love for sure, you just need to figure out what's important to you in the place where you live first.

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueDevil63 View Post

I entered into the same process early last year.  My requirements were a bit different from yours in that I already lived in a very small mountain town out west and wanted something a bit bigger and more diverse.  But I considered all the places people have listed here plus some others.  Here was my list:

 

Bend, OR

Sandpoint, ID

Sun Valley/Ketchum/Hailey, ID

Boise, ID

Driggs/Tetonia, ID

Whitefish, MT

Bozeman, MT

Missoula, MT

Jackson, WY

Steamboat Springs, CO

Eagle, CO

Durango, CO

Telluride, CO

Carbondale, CO

Crested Butte, CO

Park City, UT

Ogden, UT

 

You might also consider:

 

Pagosa Springs, CO

Taos, NM

 

I ended up choosing Park City.  One of my main issues was what I would do if my work from home gig fell apart.  I did not want to have to move again (well my family didn't want to have to move again).  So access to significant employment opportunities was a big thing for me and led me to cross places like Telluride and Taos and a few others off the list.

 


Man, what a great list.

 

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

Just about any place you pick in a mountainous region "out west" will offer all of what you want in terms of hiking, camping, skiing, backpacking, and climbing. And I can't imagine not being able to find reasonable accommodations for $1400 a month anywhere.

 

I wouldn't go where people on the internet tell me to go or where a magazine editor  tells me to live. I would live where I want to live. But if you don't care then maybe it doesn't matter.

 

 

 

 

 



Pretty unhelpful conclusion. How exactly do you figure out where you want to live without consulting with someone/something? Pretty sure anyone that's traveled or moved anywhere has gotten loads of information from friends, books, magazines, travel agents, etc. Did you just magically come up with where you wanted to live and all the information necessary about why you wanted to move there? You don't really figure out where you want to move by throwing a dart at the map of the US.

 

Even if you plan to do a road trip, you should have at least some idea where you're going. Something that you can figure out by talking to others and reading up on destinations.

 

OP--There's actually a post about Nat Geo's 25 Best ski towns in the General Skiing section of this forum. It looks largely similar to Blue Devil's list, but with some international flair. Definitely a good resource.

post #21 of 25

My guess is you can learn a whole lot more for a lot less time and money by reading instead of driving. Once your research has narrowed the field to a few good candidates you might have enough free time to get to know one or two of your top choices. Visiting as a tourist for a few days or even weeks is not like living there as a local and dealing with the public services, health care facilities, schools, churches, non-resort oriented retailers etc. When you're visiting as a vacationer or a prospective tenant or customer you will get one vibe. . Months later after you've made a few friends it may be entirely different. You might be surprised to find that things like RFD mail service you take for granted in Georgia may not be available where you're going. A 30 minute drive is required to get your mail at the post office may not be convenient for a work at home job. As an outdoors-man and not just a skier you may also find the overall feeling about public and private lands may be different in the West from what it is in the South. As a fellow Southerner I know I found there are some different assumptions when it came to property rights and values between different parts of the country. Not better or worse - just different. That's the kind of stuff you don't learn on a drive thru trip.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post



Pretty unhelpful conclusion. How exactly do you figure out where you want to live without consulting with someone/something? Pretty sure anyone that's traveled or moved anywhere has gotten loads of information from friends, books, magazines, travel agents, etc. Did you just magically come up with where you wanted to live and all the information necessary about why you wanted to move there? You don't really figure out where you want to move by throwing a dart at the map of the US.

 

Even if you plan to do a road trip, you should have at least some idea where you're going. Something that you can figure out by talking to others and reading up on destinations.

 

OP--There's actually a post about Nat Geo's 25 Best ski towns in the General Skiing section of this forum. It looks largely similar to Blue Devil's list, but with some international flair. Definitely a good resource.

 

The Op did not say he wanted to live in a "ski town" or even anywhere near an actual resort nor in the mountains. He was talking about a cabin in the woods somewhere he could "go skiing". Skiing could mean XC on a forest road or local golf course, it could mean touring, it could mean a small local ski hill, or a big destination mega resort. How close does he want to be to this skiing?  I have no idea what he wants. I don't know who he is or what his goals are.

 

 

 

post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 

Wow...sounds like many of you have been in my shoes and thanks for all the great advice.  I really just needed a reference of where to begin.  While I would love to take a road trip, I have limited time off from work so between the move and other trips this would be hard.  I like the idea of being somewhat located near to a bigger city should I lose my sweet set up as a consultant.  I think I have what I need to move forward...thank you again so much and I'll let you know where I land. 

post #24 of 25
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueDevil63 View Post

http://www.findyourspot.com


 

Cool site.  It sent me to where I now live (and enjoy living) in addition to several other appealing places.

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