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Using a shorter GS ski for carving...good/bad idea?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I am looking for a ski to practice balance, carving, staying forward, and proper technique.  I started looking at skis similiar to Progressors, Supershapes, and the like. In looking at these skis, I would be buying somthing in the low 180s. In looking, I've also noticed: $$$$; they are a pretty penny!

 

...but there's an abundace of affordable (read: cheap enough for me to buy) GS skis on the market.  As a 6'4", 240#, strong person, I would probably use a 188 or so if I were racing...but I'm not racing, just pretending. But could a 182 or so GS ski work for my purposes? This ski doesn't have to be particularly versatile...I have other skis for everything aside from the single purpose of this ski; it will be merely a training tool for a few hours in the morning.

 

Note: A majority of my skiing is in the Poconos, so I fear that a 188 race ski is just too much for the size of the hill and the crowds generally seen there.  

 

Has anyone ever tried using a short GS (shorter than what they'd use for racing) as a replacement for a carving type ski? Or is this a terrible idea?

 

Note2: I've been keeping my eye out for a 186/188 old 21M ski, I just haven't found one yet (or is that not right either).

 

-Smarty

post #2 of 16

Probably want to keep it around 17 or 18 m if you like to ski fast, but are limited to small hills.

post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smartyiak View Post

I am looking for a ski to practice balance, carving, staying forward, and proper technique.  I started looking at skis similiar to Progressors, Supershapes, and the like. In looking at these skis, I would be buying somthing in the low 180s. In looking, I've also noticed: $$$$; they are a pretty penny!

 

...but there's an abundace of affordable (read: cheap enough for me to buy) GS skis on the market.  As a 6'4", 240#, strong person, I would probably use a 188 or so if I were racing...but I'm not racing, just pretending. But could a 182 or so GS ski work for my purposes? This ski doesn't have to be particularly versatile...I have other skis for everything aside from the single purpose of this ski; it will be merely a training tool for a few hours in the morning.

 

Note: A majority of my skiing is in the Poconos, so I fear that a 188 race ski is just too much for the size of the hill and the crowds generally seen there.  

 

Has anyone ever tried using a short GS (shorter than what they'd use for racing) as a replacement for a carving type ski? Or is this a terrible idea?

 

Note2: I've been keeping my eye out for a 186/188 old 21M ski, I just haven't found one yet (or is that not right either).

 

-Smarty




As long as it is not crowded I do not think a GS ski (even 27meter) is too much for some of the bigger hill in the poconos like Montage or Blue. I actually think youd be happiest on the 190 plus skis as they get easier to skid as you add length.

 

I have been freeskiing another Board members Super G skis with a 33 meter sidecut at stowe early mornings and have to say its really is a teddy bear due to its length.

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

As long as it is not crowded I do not think a GS ski (even 27meter) is too much for some of the bigger hill in the poconos like Montage or Blue. I actually think youd be happiest on the 190 plus skis as they get easier to skid as you add length.

 

I have been freeskiing another Board members Super G skis with a 33 meter sidecut at stowe early mornings and have to say its really is a teddy bear due to its length.

I'm not a very experienced skier, so take this for what it's worth, but I have a pair of 186cm Fischer Jr. Super G race skis (R=27m) and have a lot of fun with them on days that aren't too crowded.  I can make nice carved turns with a radius of about 25-30 ft. which makes them suitable for the small groomed hills I ski on (http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=Dagmar+Resort,+Lake+Ridge+Road,+Ashburn,+ON&hl=en&ll=44.010156,-79.058132&spn=0.003067,0.006968&sll=44.129616,-79.124951&sspn=0.024489,0.055747&oq=dagmar&hq=Dagmar+Resort,+Lake+Ridge+Road,+Ashburn,+ON&radius=15000&t=h&z=18).  They're easy to skid when necessary too.  (I'm 6 ft. and 185 lbs.)

 

post #5 of 16

Be careful with those 186 SG's. That is a Jr. ski designed for a 13-14 yr old. They will e very easy to bend or damage with your weight on board.

 

SJ

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View PostBe careful with those 186 SG's. That is a Jr. ski designed for a 13-14 yr old. They will be very easy to bend or damage with your weight on board. SJ

Wow eek.gif Thanks for the advice, I never thought of that!
 

 

post #7 of 16

I ski the 2010 Dynastar Speed Course WC (FIS) GS Ski in the women's length (176) so the turning radius is 23m.  I'm 170lbs, 6ft and  ski southern Ontario (Blue, The Peaks, Mansfield etc), where ever I can cheap (or free) passes.

 

Love the ski, No probs in the short narrow runs.  Great prices around for this ski and similar vintage model skis.

 

In one of SierraJim's other post he mentions reason why people buy the skis they do, I like to cruise, fast and push the ski/ability to the limit, space and crowd permitting, most of my skiing is groomed hard pack and if I get to ski powder I'll make do.  For the majority of my skiing I don't want to be limited by the skis, and this ski has yet to falter.

 

Ski well, ski hard, improve the skill.

 

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 16

The key word is "practice".  If that means your still learning carving, I don't see how a ski that needs to be going 20mph before it starts turning is going to help you.  Poconos = crowds which means you'll constantly be coming out of your long radius carve to avoid people.  Ebay is your friend - as are may sites linked to this board.  You can easily find something suitable.  I just picked up older but new speed course ti's for $500 with bindings with shipping.  I'm sure you can get a better deal if you just want a "carver" - I was specific to the make/model/size that I wanted.  Even an old pair of Metrons could be your friend - it was hard not to carve those.

post #9 of 16
Oh yeah! A real racer will be better than a progressor or similar any day!!! Idk about 190s even at your size in the Poconos.......wait I was the kid who skied 215 DHs there in the late 80's!!

If you are interested, I have a set of 21m Nordica's in a 186- Edgewise tune &
The skis I won the masters eastern GS champs (grp) on in 2010 just sitting in my basement.
Shoot me a pm.
post #10 of 16
Fwiw - I may pick up a 180 to "free ski" on next season!
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

Fwiw - I may pick up a 180 to "free ski" on next season!


smile.gif  this years free ski (non-slalom) has ended up being a 183 Fischer GS in 27m.  After hunting down some 23m versions I found I preferred the 27m - go figure!. 

post #12 of 16

It is an excellent idea.

 

Freeskiing race stock GS skis is the most fun thing in skiing.  The sensations rival rollercoasters at Six Flags.

 

They bust crud like it is their job.  They don't take crap from the snow, and they cling to ice like white on rice.

 

You really owe it to yourself to try it.  I guarantee once you do you'll never go back to sub-20 meter skis.

post #13 of 16

Wish I said it that way!  Nicely put.

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

It is an excellent idea.

 

Freeskiing race stock GS skis is the most fun thing in skiing.  The sensations rival rollercoasters at Six Flags.

 

They bust crud like it is their job.  They don't take crap from the snow, and they cling to ice like white on rice.

 

You really owe it to yourself to try it.  I guarantee once you do you'll never go back to sub-20 meter skis.


eh bust crud? maybe you definition of crud is different than mine. 

 

they work awesome on hard snow and ice but even on groomers sometimes the groomer can be to soft and the ski will push the snow out of the way instead of bending. 

 

post #15 of 16
For the purpose and environment you describe a full blown race stock mens FIS spec ski would probably work better. But it would be a 165cm SL. Then you make no sacrifices and can carve up a storm on that small hill.
post #16 of 16

Greetings:

I'm about your size and age, and put in about 40 days a year on GS race skis in the West and use nothing else when there isn't powder--.  I had a pair of 183cm Fischer World Cup skis at 24m radius that I skied on for a season, but once I moved to full 188cm FIS 27 meter skis I only took the 24 meter skis out once or twice to confirm how much better the longer, straighter ski is.  At your weight you will just overpower a GS ski with the chick flex and length.  Even the strongest World Cup women like Vonn and Reich are skiing on men's skis and they only weigh 140# or so.  Compared to any recreational ski or 'citizen'  race ski, skiing on the real thing will be a revelation. And if you want to stand up and partially skid your turns the FIS radius ski is easier, not harder to ski on!  If you are interested in a pair of 2009 188cm Fischer race stock GS for a couple of bills or any of the other older skis in my quiver, give me a shout.   Richard  horizonsatinboxdotcom.

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