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Looking for coaching tips - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post


I usually call changes in the sole canting and aligning the cuff I call cuff alignment.

Many boot techs work inside the boot today instead of grinding. Even the Head race techs work primarily that way.

 



Explain a bit more in detail. Do you mean they adjust your in the lateral sideways plane from inside the boot? By fiddling with the seppa?

 

post #32 of 46

Footbeds (what you call seppa?), insole.

To post the insole is almost the same as shimming and grinding, from the foots point of view you are raising one side. Then you just use the cuff alignment to get the leg centered. If you need a lot then you may have to go outside of the boot because you run out of space inside.

post #33 of 46

I call the pc of plastic usually attached with a screw to the bottom of the boot on the inside for "seppa". Maybe its the wrong word. On my old Nordica Beast it was made of a rubber to give a more comfortable feel. On my Dobermans from 2 years back it was made out of steel for better rigity. Cold as heck. Anyway, on top of that comes the linear and then comes the footbed inside the boot. But to my experiance there is nothing that makes more impact on how much you are canted as working with tilting the bindings or anguling the bottom of the boot. To be honest, I dont feel that much difference when I swap foot beds as when I put a shim under the BTE side of my boot. I might be a minority but IMO the custom made footbeds are many times highly over rated. They can add comfort.

post #34 of 46

TDK, my point was just that from the foots point of view you are standing on a wedge between the ski and the foot. Whether the wedge part is in the binding, boot sole, bed or insole shouldn't matter if they are properly implemented. The foot will not notice the difference.

 

Granted the insole need to be properly supported and flat underneath, but that is true in all different ways of getting a wedge.

 

If you start your fitting by making an insole that straightens the calcaneal angle you have a good start. However, if you add shims outside of the boot the angle will not be straight anymore. 

post #35 of 46

I think we could agree that sole grinding is the last thing on the list after cuff alignment, foot beds, board/heel angle, etc... The grind or shim is the last bit that can't be resolved by other means.

post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post

TDK, my point was just that from the foots point of view you are standing on a wedge between the ski and the foot. Whether the wedge part is in the binding, boot sole, bed or insole shouldn't matter if they are properly implemented. The foot will not notice the difference.

 

Granted the insole need to be properly supported and flat underneath, but that is true in all different ways of getting a wedge.

 

If you start your fitting by making an insole that straightens the calcaneal angle you have a good start. However, if you add shims outside of the boot the angle will not be straight anymore. 



I had to google "calcaneal angle" but came up with nothing. No good explanations an engineer can understand anyway. However, I have at least 20 footbeds. Standard ones that come with the boots, off the shelf special footbeds and an assortment of custom made. Some rigid some very thin and soft. But from my experiance the footbeds do not have such a big effect on my skiing. And taping the bottom of my linear with a 1cm wide stripe of duct tape has absolutely no effect on how I feel my edges. If I do the same between the binding and the plate I feel the difference. The foot of the linear is soft so it kind of squashes. Also, the footbeds are also pressing against a soft linear base and the footbeds are round. What kind of work do you need to have done if you work inside the boot?

 

post #37 of 46
Thread Starter 

some updates here is a pic with the latest grind and some duct tape help
duct tape corrected.jpg
 

here is a nasty SL shot...
IMG_1000.JPGIMG_1001.JPG

a
nd here is a video without the duct tape

post #38 of 46

Nice picks and video. Where did you put the duct tape? You have nice angles and you have nice round carved lines. Relesing your turns with your outside ski and flexing through the transitions. However, I see a hint of that old up-down movement. I see it resulting in a bit of hip dumping and park and ride. Just a hint. Maybe Im wrong. You seem to start all your turns with a very aggressive hip counter. Maybe its this move that prevents you from tipping that inside ski properly. In the first photo you look perfect. Less a-framed. Ski like that on the course and you will be on the podium. Compared to the next photo on the course, look how low with your upper body you are. Standing upright like that is bad for your balance. Be more forward, more aggressive. Block lower. There is a huge difference between your free skiing and when you are in the gates. That is normal. Try to carry your free skiing over into the gates. With the Blizzards you need a very open course. I use 7 ski lengths when I set a course for my Blizzards.

post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post



I had to google "calcaneal angle" but came up with nothing. No good explanations an engineer can understand anyway. However, I have at least 20 footbeds. Standard ones that come with the boots, off the shelf special footbeds and an assortment of custom made. Some rigid some very thin and soft. But from my experiance the footbeds do not have such a big effect on my skiing. And taping the bottom of my linear with a 1cm wide stripe of duct tape has absolutely no effect on how I feel my edges. If I do the same between the binding and the plate I feel the difference. The foot of the linear is soft so it kind of squashes. Also, the footbeds are also pressing against a soft linear base and the footbeds are round. What kind of work do you need to have done if you work inside the boot?

 


To get the same effect you would have to add angle internall AND move the cuff outwards.

 

post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Nice picks and video. Where did you put the duct tape? You have nice angles and you have nice round carved lines. Relesing your turns with your outside ski and flexing through the transitions. However, I see a hint of that old up-down movement. I see it resulting in a bit of hip dumping and park and ride. Just a hint. Maybe Im wrong. You seem to start all your turns with a very aggressive hip counter. Maybe its this move that prevents you from tipping that inside ski properly. In the first photo you look perfect. Less a-framed. Ski like that on the course and you will be on the podium. Compared to the next photo on the course, look how low with your upper body you are. Standing upright like that is bad for your balance. Be more forward, more aggressive. Block lower. There is a huge difference between your free skiing and when you are in the gates. That is normal. Try to carry your free skiing over into the gates. With the Blizzards you need a very open course. I use 7 ski lengths when I set a course for my Blizzards.



Yes i def have a "hip problem" because I feel like my alignement is almost spot on now. the duct tape is 4 strips on the inside of the front binding and i'm really liking it on the SL, the GS i might need to change the tune a bit. I'm also working on skiing the gate like i free-ski but it's easier said than done! ;) my times are dropping consistently every race and i'm now in the fastest class/lowest handicap of my league even if i'm still far away from the top 2 guys. but it's getting closer. as far as the courses, i have no say in how they set them up in training and the races well... they set it to accomodate a wide range of skiers so...

as far as the hip i've been trying to ski with my hands on my hips but if you know any other exercises to fix it that'd be great!

once again thanks for the feedback!
 

Jay.

post #41 of 46

jzamp - great to hear. The alignment fixes sound healthy to me. You deffinetly need less canting for GS and if the course is very icy you need even less. Also in SL.

 

Your inside knee is not tipping!

One drill I can think of is setting up some brushes or short gates in a straight flush and try to use only your knees to tip your skis. And pay attention to your inside knee. Both knees and feet should work in parallell. You also need to pull back that inside leg in order to be able to apply pressure to that ski. Your ski will not be pulled back. However, that is not the intention. The intention is to create pressure on your shins and engage the inside ski more. Narrowing your stance a bit will help with it all. When you ski a flush you should have a very narrow stance. They once asked Anja Paersson after a race she won in the WC if she had thaught of any technique stuff during her run. She said that the only thing she was focussing actively on, or had the time to, was to hit every gate with her inside shin guard and something else I cant remember. So its pritty important I would say.

 

Just out of interest, what height, weight are you and what is your boot size?

 

BTW, maybe you should take this discussion to the racing forum.

post #42 of 46
Thread Starter 

the whole pulling the inside leg back is one thing that i was never able to fully understand/do... but i'll try!
 

I'm 185cm, about 86kg @ 13% body fat, running 317mm boots and a 10.5US shoe size

post #43 of 46

So your foot size is 10,5US but you are in shell # 27! Correct? Did your boot fit right out of the box? Are you using the original liner? Which seppa are you using, pc of plastic thats under the liner, higher or lower?

 

The reason I was asking about your weight was that the Blizzard is very stiff and has little shape to it. Its very narrow in the tail. Im shifting to Volkl next year to get a bit more shape to the ski and make it a bit more turny. Im a bit taller and heavier 190/95 and the ski works well but not on tight courses.

 

Pulling the inside foot back is something I had a hard time to relate to as well. But its such an important element in modern skiing that it has to be delt with one way or annother. There is much missinformation as well so try different methods and techniques. For a good visual check out Didier Cuche on his last GS race on wooden skis and in leather boots.

 

didier001.JPG

 

 And here an other visual:

didier002.JPG

post #44 of 46
Thread Starter 

boot is a 8.5UK, we had to do quite a bit of grinding but now it's pretty good. I'm using the original liner without the spacers, and the white/higher footboard. i've skied the lower one but didn't really like it.

as far as skis i've very limited experience on SL, last time i raced skis were still pretty long and straight lol. I generally prefer a stiffer ski because i can push pretty hard with my legs, i'd like to have the possibility to run a few courses on different skis to feel the difference but for now it's those or nothing...

i've tried to "pull out" the knee like that but the inside ski becomes instantly hooky and it throws me off. i probably shift my weight inside trying to open up the knees so i need to find a better way to do it...

post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinerd View Post

Nice aggressive skiing jzamp.

 

Boot issues aside... I think your outside ski will grip a bit better by pushing your outside foot though turn a bit more... feel the bottom of your foot pushing through the arc rather than driving the front of the boot to steer the skis. When your foot is appropriately placed to support the center of mass against all those nasty forces everything else seems to fall into place. Perhaps try telemarking for a day and see what happens.

 No dont push on outside ski (focus on tipping little toe edge of inside ski not on big toe edge) stand firm on it. Instead drop the inside hip by flexing & continuing to flex inside leg while tipping inside ski, flex to release. When both skis come togeather as close as possible start next turn by tipping.

post #46 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder Jet View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinerd View Post

Nice aggressive skiing jzamp.

 

Boot issues aside... I think your outside ski will grip a bit better by pushing your outside foot though turn a bit more... feel the bottom of your foot pushing through the arc rather than driving the front of the boot to steer the skis. When your foot is appropriately placed to support the center of mass against all those nasty forces everything else seems to fall into place. Perhaps try telemarking for a day and see what happens.

 No dont push on outside ski (focus on tipping little toe edge of inside ski not on big toe edge) stand firm on it. Instead drop the inside hip by flexing & continuing to flex inside leg while tipping inside ski, flex to release. When both skis come togeather as close as possible start next turn by tipping.


I didn't say push on the outside ski... I said push the outside foot forward (place the outside foot ahead of where it is currently). Only once the foot is in the right place to support the COM will he be able to properly move the hips inside.

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