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What are the disadvantages to racing in all-mountain boots? - Page 2

post #31 of 35

Try not to look at the labels race or all mountain.

 

Just about every manufacturer has a recreational race boot (98mm last) and a top of the line all mountain boot, the only difference

being the color of the plastic they are shot in.

 

Be concerned with appropriate flex and fit for YOU.

 

For example, I don't race, and I ski in an Atomic RT Ti, 95 mm last for my very slender foot and lower

leg

 

IN A 100 FLEX!  I can flex it both on trail and off.  If I were to race, it would work perfectly for me.

My friends would all crush that boot, but for me it is perfect.

 

Only 2 things to know about boots, you can make them softer but not stiffer, and you can make them bigger but not

smaller.

 

To give you a real world example, my 2 most regular ski partners happen to race the town downhill here at Snow King, and finish top 10 in the pro division every year.

One skis in Lange plugs, the other in the Rossi all mountain boot 130 flex.  True this is actually a Super G, but they do record speeds

in the low 60s.  Would the guy in the Rossis prefer a stiffer boot for this? Sure, but he isn't going to buy a boot for 3 days out of the year

when he can make the lesser boot work.

 

 

post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by supergaper View Post

Try not to look at the labels race or all mountain.

 

Just about every manufacturer has a recreational race boot (98mm last) and a top of the line all mountain boot, the only difference

being the color of the plastic they are shot in.

 

Be concerned with appropriate flex and fit for YOU.

 

For example, I don't race, and I ski in an Atomic RT Ti, 95 mm last for my very slender foot and lower

leg

 

IN A 100 FLEX!  I can flex it both on trail and off.  If I were to race, it would work perfectly for me.

My friends would all crush that boot, but for me it is perfect.

 

Only 2 things to know about boots, you can make them softer but not stiffer, and you can make them bigger but not

smaller.

 

To give you a real world example, my 2 most regular ski partners happen to race the town downhill here at Snow King, and finish top 10 in the pro division every year.

One skis in Lange plugs, the other in the Rossi all mountain boot 130 flex.  True this is actually a Super G, but they do record speeds

in the low 60s.  Would the guy in the Rossis prefer a stiffer boot for this? Sure, but he isn't going to buy a boot for 3 days out of the year

when he can make the lesser boot work.

 

 




Most speed events even at the WC level are run on a softer boot than the tech events. 130 flex is probably where most of the men's flex would end up.

 

 

post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


I love this. Geniuses of the body who just exist in another timespace dimension, have skills we can only glimpse.  


Genius of the body is a great way to put it.

I've skied some soft AT boots in a lift-served situation and for me it definitely requires more precision. Not a bad way to sharpen your timing etc. Wouldn't want to do it often though, I prefer a slightly firmer boot. Skiers who are very "ankly" in their skiing seem to like really soft forward flex, or at least tolerate it more happily. I'm more into using my knees and hips with a more limited ankle range. Slow tight trees are the only place I like the really soft boot.

On race skis I wouldn't like it much, I'd want a bigger sweet spot on the ski or a firmer boot to help me with my lame fore-aft positioning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



Then why do alot of all-mountain boots have a rubber bootboard? Does it do nothing, serve no purpose?


Some people report a more comfy ride. I haven't ever tried any comparisons, but I can believe the reports are sincere. For example, I feel comfort differences between firm cork footbeds and slightly more flexible synthetic-based ones, especially when the snow's really firm.
post #34 of 35

For what it's worth, I much prefer the control of my old race boots to my not quite so old comfy boots.

 

The hard Superfeet Korks do inflict a little pain on my planter's fasciitis landing hard on icy surfaces, but maybe that's because I've abused my heels a little too much.  And they are cold, very cold.

 

The comfy boots just have too much give everywhere and too much heel-slop especially.  There is no precision; it's like trying to work on a watch wearing 1/4" neoprene diving gloves.  Sometimes a little undulation in the snow/hardpack can manipulate my ski before my reaction can correct the movement in my comfy boots, but in my race boots that never happens, my skis do exactly what I want when I want and there is no other influence taking over until the slop gets used up 'cause there is no slop.

post #35 of 35
Thread Starter 

I have heard that a lot of modern all-mountain boots now have more upright cuffs and less ramp.  I don't like all the forward-lean my boots have for all-mountain skiing.  Charging GS arc??? = no problem.  Some other things??? = not quite ideal having 17 degrees forward lean.

 

Also, because my leg only contacts the boot tongue (and thus cuff) and one point, the effective leverage I have on the boot tongue is reduced substantilly, maybe even exponentially.  Thus, the force required to flex a 125 boot becomes that required to flex a 195 or maybe even 205 boot.

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