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Worn out boot sole?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I have a pair of boots that fit me like no other boot ever has.  I spent much time, money, and effort on them until I got them right.  I hope to keep using the shells for many more years.  I will not give them up easily and I've been very protective of the soles to keep them from becoming too worn to use.

 

Today I had some new skis mounted and, of course, I took one of my boots to use in the mounting process.  While the skis and boots were still there, I got a call from the shop and the guy told me that the bottom of my boot heel was worn almost to the point that it would be detrimental to the working of the binding (Salomon 912 TI) so much so that he wondered if I didn't want to consider a new boot before mounting.  I told him no, and to go ahead and mount them with my old boots.  When I got to the shop they told me the same thing, that the heel on the boot was worn so that it might interfere with the working of the binding and that they were unsure if they should have mounted it, so not to blame them for any problems I might have.

 

This raised my level of concern, so when I got home I put my boot in the binding and took a look to see what they were talking about.  What I saw was that the binding does not in any way contact the part of the boot heel with wear.  That part of the boot is suspended far from any binding part and there is no way that it could touch any part of the binding even if it wasn't worn down.

 

So my question is, am I missing something and there really is a problem, or were they just trying to scam me into buying a new pair of boots?

post #2 of 19

hate to say it but they have a pretty good point, if you like your knees attached well at all points then you either need to be considering new boots or if they have replaceable parts on the sole having them replaced (i am guessing that they do not based on what has been said) 

 

they are your knees so only you can make the decision, but it does sound terminal for the boots  

post #3 of 19

you might be able to put lifter plates on the boot soles by having the bottom of the boot planed flat and the 'lifter' used to get back to DIN standard,. The plates are then easily replaceable... but boot shells DO wear out over time. You can replace the liners and get more life out of a boot but the shells have a life span also.

post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

you might be able to put lifter plates on the boot soles by having the bottom of the boot planed flat and the 'lifter' used to get back to DIN standard,. The plates are then easily replaceable... but boot shells DO wear out over time. You can replace the liners and get more life out of a boot but the shells have a life span also.



You can find a bootfitterwho works with junior racers to put plates on the bottom.  If no bootfitter near you says he'll do it, find a certified pedorthist who works with skiers who will do it.  Then have the plates replaced every year.  

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm still unclear on WHY these heels are not OK.  The wear creates a bevel at the back end of the sole, not enough to cut down through the replaceable heel piece (which is much smaller than any of the new boots I've looked at) to the plastic of the shell.  The bottom of the sole is fine.  Why, if the sole itself is not ground down to new dimensions, is it a problem?  When the boot is clicked into the binding it has no possibility of touching any part of the binding with the area of the boot that's worn, and would not touch if there was no wear either.  It seems to the layman like that particular part of the boot is not part of the release equation.

 

What am I not seeing?

 

P.S.  I examined several new boots and noticed that some have squared off heels and some are beveled.  Mine was squared off, and now it's beveled much like the new ones.

post #6 of 19

if you have a replaceable heel piece... replace it. Problem solved. (if you haven't worn through the replaceable heel pad then it sounds like the shop might be fishing for a boot sale).

 

To answer your question, most shops have a guide that is used to determine if the boot lugs meet the DIN standard. It determines wear, if the boot is worn beyond a certain amount it's no longer indemnified, just like a binding.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

if you have a replaceable heel piece... replace it. Problem solved. (if you haven't worn through the replaceable heel pad then it sounds like the shop might be fishing for a boot sale).


OK, how do I come by a heel piece for a Dolomite Sintesi 8.5 boot?  They're long gone from the shelves and I can't seem to find anything about them online.  I'll contact my bootfitter, but if someone knows where to get such an item, I'll just do it.

post #8 of 19

One issue could be this: your binding is designed to release that flat sole. if the boot can "rock" back as it twists out, pivoting differently at the heel due to wear, it could jam itself into a configuration that sticks in the binding. that's a long shot, but the only issue I can see. normally, I buy boots that have no replacement sole pieces and have them retrofitted at the start.  now most boots are going to offer that feature, but you have to buy some extra  pieces when the boot is new on the shelf to assure supply exists. 

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

One issue could be this: your binding is designed to release that flat sole. if the boot can "rock" back as it twists out, pivoting differently at the heel due to wear, it could jam itself into a configuration that sticks in the binding. 


I considered this, but the worn part of the sole is held up and away from any part of the binding.  Even during a twisting release it has nothing to twist against, and wouldn't even if it was brand new and unworn.  Everything that should be touching something is in perfect shape as far as I can tell.

 

I certainly don't want to poo-poo the input from the pros, so I'll continue to research this and see if I can find a replacement part.  It sure can't hurt anything and may keep me from being injured, but why or how it would do so is not clear to me.

 

Another thought that has come to my head is that the bindings are Salomon, which this shop does not carry.  Is it possible that they are basing their evaluation of the sole wear on the requirements of another manufacturer or, like DIN, is this an industry standard?

post #10 of 19

this is where a picture would be useful. the heel on a flat surface and/or in the binding. How did the heel wear and not the sole?  If you put your boot on a flat counter surface, can you rock it side to side at all?

 

another scenario: your heel is coming up to release from the binding in a forward heel release. The upper area of the heel is pushing the heel piece up and back but then it comes to the angled worn area and quits putting constant pressure on the heel piece, thus creating a moment of hesitation in the heel piece, thus compromising release. possible, not likely.

 

I guess you're current problem has to do with getting your older stuff worked on by a shop. otherwise, you can judge the functionality of the boot yourself.

post #11 of 19

Search for the Dynastar-Lange-Race-10-11.pdf

 

It has a listing of the current boot ISO standards in the back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

Here are a couple of pictures of the boot and the boot in the binding.

 

IMG_1530.JPG

 

IMG_1533.JPG

post #13 of 19

can you rock or wobble the boot on a flat surface? that piece would be simple to make out of plastic.

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

can you rock or wobble the boot on a flat surface? that piece would be simple to make out of plastic.



It won't rock or wobble.  I've considered fabricating something, but I've emailed my bootfitter to ask if replacement parts are available, but I imagine he's not in the shop today.

post #15 of 19

I've seen much worse. Use Cat-Tracks and get a few replacement black pads.

post #16 of 19

I have old comfortable boots that I don't want to give up also (Solomon Force). They have to be close to a dozen years old. Heel was worn just as you describe/show but replaceable like yours. Went to my ski shop & they looked up the part. Ordered the part & wa-la new boots. 25 bucks installed. Did it this year.

post #17 of 19

The heel pad wear does not look excessive and as previously stated does not look like it would interfere with the functioning of the binding. Maybe the problem is the binding itself, so perhaps a visit to a Solomon dealer is in order.

Personally, i am not a Solomon fan. They have great marketing, perhaps the best in the industry, but a lot of their products offer initial high performance but low longevity. Example: Solomon skis have thinner base material than other brands and this means it is easier to hit a rock and end up with a core shot. Also with a thin base the ski will tolerate less belt sanding/stone grinding than other skis.

post #18 of 19

There is nothing dysfunctional about the profile wear on that boot heel.  Many comments are blind to mechanics and only a reaction to the spectre of calamity..  As the OP indicated,  you can  purchase some boot models that will have similar heel shape and profile as new from the box. 

 

But,  there is money to be made in selling new equipment (and plastic does get old,  but that is a different topic).

 

You could go to a boot fitter,  tell him you want to improve your skiing, and that you are quite sure that you have a canting issue and want your boots "planed".  The fitter will measure your knees, then run your boots over his planer, tilting the boot sole in correction AND reducing the effective heel wear by removing sole material.  Then the upper portion of both heel and toe binding areas will be  built up with some sort of epoxy filler.  The excess filler material will be routed down to the specified height as described in the German industrial guidelines that define the ski boot/ binding interface  (often just called "DIN").  Now you are back to "new" surfaces all around and have the smug satisfaction of knowing you are canted" to perfection. And this does not include the performance benefit of sole planing, and so  "being closer to the ski" (Note:!  I have never done any of this,  all hypothetical ;-)

 

You may sense I am being a bit sarcastic,  but this boot improvement will also "correct" the deterioration due to use and wear. And just might enhance your skiing experience.

 

OR,  as I have done,  cut out a piece of PVC plastic that is the same shape as your heal insert.  Drill for the mounting holes and screw it on.  PVC pipe is readily flattened by heating and pressing it flat while it cools.  Paint the edges black if you want.

 

I hate blind "gotta do it's"

post #19 of 19

I had a similar issue with out-of-print Technica boots...either the toe or heel pieces were worn down to the main shell and my shop was able to order replacements from Technica.  I did notice that after replacing the worn pieces I was able to click into my bindings easier so there did seem to be some binding-related function.

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