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Do Bushwackers have metal lamination in them? Yes or no? - Page 3

post #61 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post



Any ski can be ridden switch. Can you land 180's switch? Sure, but twin tips are easier. I don't know if there's any way all your questions will ever be answered until you ski on them.

One day it's klister to slow down in bumps, now it's riding switch. The other day all your skis were worthless, and two weeks ago, you were railing with your hip on the snow and crushing your beer league. The questions just don't add up into a comprehensible picture of your current skiing, or what you really want to do.



Mark, all of my questions do not necessarily relate to any specific, current aspect of my skiing, or goals.  Some are for general understanding of things, and to stimulate discourse on various subjects in skiing.

 

I've skied the Bushwackers... but only on orange sorbet, and man, were they sweet.

post #62 of 78
Thread Starter 

Has anyone hucked their meat on the Bushwackers?  If so, up to what cliff height?

 

Also, has anyone landed tricks in the park on bushwackers?

 

 

What about casual air off humps and bumps?

post #63 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Has anyone hucked their meat on the Bushwackers?  If so, up to what cliff height?

 

Also, has anyone landed tricks in the park on bushwackers?

 

 

What about casual air off humps and bumps?


if you thinking about park at all DO NOT get these. Again just get "the ones" 

 

have I landed tricks yes, but never backwards. casual air has nothing to do with the skis and hucking cliff has more to do with conditions ski lenght and steepness of landing. 

 

 

post #64 of 78
Thread Starter 

The Bushwackers aren't stiff at all; they are like a spaghetti string; they feel like Male America, pre-sildenafil.

 

I am puzzled by the review that said they had "vise-like edge grip"

 

But that's good, because I already have stiff skis for when the snow would require them.

post #65 of 78
Thread Starter 

What Bushwacking-bevels are people running... is 1/3 okay for these bovine boards?

post #66 of 78

1/3 is what I run mine at...

post #67 of 78
Thread Starter 

These skis have a brain... that bull on the topsheet is alive in the ski... it knows when you want to cruise, and when you want to lay boot on the edge.  This is a "smart ski," (like a "smart phone).

 

There is nothing this ski can't do.  I have plans to run gates in it when the snow is soft.

 

It still is soft like a spaghetti string, but man when you step on the sweet spot, this thing muscles up and delivers.

post #68 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post



Any ski can be ridden switch. Can you land 180's switch? Sure, but twin tips are easier. I don't know if there's any way all your questions will ever be answered until you ski on them.

One day it's klister to slow down in bumps, now it's riding switch. The other day all your skis were worthless, and two weeks ago, you were railing with your hip on the snow and crushing your beer league. The questions just don't add up into a comprehensible picture of your current skiing, or what you really want to do.



OUCH!

post #69 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

The Bushwackers aren't stiff at all; they are like a spaghetti string; they feel like Male America, pre-sildenafil.

 

I am puzzled by the review that said they had "vise-like edge grip"

 

But that's good, because I already have stiff skis for when the snow would require them.



you do not need stiff skis along the lenght for it to have GREAT edge grip

post #70 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post



you do not need stiff skis along the lenght for it to have GREAT edge grip



I was envisioning taking rollovers at 40 mph and 2+ G's.  Not the Bushwacker's forte.

 

However, I still like these things, and anything short of that is fair game for these things.

 

 

But seriously, the 180 is actually a 176, and it a bit too much like bubble gum.  They need a 191, and a stiffer core.

post #71 of 78



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



I was envisioning taking rollovers at 40 mph and 2+ G's.  Not the Bushwacker's forte.

 

However, I still like these things, and anything short of that is fair game for these things.

 

 

But seriously, the 180 is actually a 176, and it a bit too much like bubble gum.  They need a 191, and a stiffer core.


FYI....WC race skis are actually softer lenght wise then their "off the rack" counterparts.  Edge grip is defined by torsional stiffness. 

 

post #72 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post



 


FYI....WC race skis are actually softer lenght wise then their "off the rack" counterparts.  Edge grip is defined by torsional stiffness. 

 


How ironic... recreational racers are concerned they may not be able to "bend" a retail race stock ski, and yet the things the pros are using are easier to bend hissyfit.gif

 

 

I'm wondering what Blizzard has cooked up in their R&D department that makes this ski have "vice-like" edge grip for Josh, yet without any metal laminates, or seemingly any torsional rigidity of any kind.  These things are like Laffy Taffy.  And yet, when you really push on them they receive the pressure well.  I almost wonder if the titanal under the binding finally engages after some amount of input.

 

In any case, I need to run these at 1/3.  The recommended edge bevels ass-out at a certain angle.

post #73 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post


How ironic... recreational racers are concerned they may not be able to "bend" a retail race stock ski, and yet the things the pros are using are easier to bend hissyfit.gif

 

 

I'm wondering what Blizzard has cooked up in their R&D department that makes this ski have "vice-like" edge grip for Josh, yet without any metal laminates, or seemingly any torsional rigidity of any kind.  These things are like Laffy Taffy.  And yet, when you really push on them they receive the pressure well.  I almost wonder if the titanal under the binding finally engages after some amount of input.

 

In any case, I need to run these at 1/3.  The recommended edge bevels ass-out at a certain angle.

 

The "ass-out" is caused by banking......ie skiers who dont angulate....ie you.  Not surpised at all that happens....work on getting angulation, it will all come together.
 

 

post #74 of 78
Thread Starter 

Just so everybody is on the same page, the skis are scary as hell on steep hills with refrozen crud.  They are fine on ice, groomed, slush, and everything else, but refrozen crud is a nightmare for these free-range bulls.

post #75 of 78

Sounds like it covers a good amount of terrain and conditions, what else did you expect? There is no one ski on the market that is dead on on every category, I guess you didn't get the memo.

post #76 of 78

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Just so everybody is on the same page, the skis are scary as hell on steep hills with refrozen crud.  They are fine on ice, groomed, slush, and everything else, but refrozen crud is a nightmare for these free-range bulls.


True refrozen crud is a nightmare on every ski I've ever been on, IMO.  That's gotta be one of the least fun conditions to ski.  Those are the days I stick to the groomers.

 

post #77 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post


True refrozen crud is a nightmare on every ski I've ever been on, IMO.  That's gotta be one of the least fun conditions to ski.  Those are the days I stick to the groomers.

 



Agree 110% icon14.gif

post #78 of 78

I had a chance to test Bushwackers 180cm for 4 days and I can confirm they are great in softer snow. I could unfortunately only stick to groomers, as the temperatures made skiing off-piste almost impossible in the Dolomites. But as each day went on, there was so much soft spring slush on-piste every afternoon I had a pretty good feel for how the ski behaves in soft stuff. And boy was it good. They flew through or over everything I met on slopes being hit with 10+ C degrees effortlessly.

 

Super easy to manouver, breaking the carve turn into a slide and vice versa, changing directions was definately a lot of fun - in my opinion thanks to front and rear rocker. I was suprised how stable the ski was in longer turn, though it probably did best at around 19-22m turns. I didn't find a speed limit (183cm/71kg) for this ski, at least not when turning, being happily surprised when I found out that I could carve without feeling in danger it at 95+ km/h. Though they did chatter a lot when going straight above 90 km/h, but not to the point of feeling troublesome.

 

Only weakness I found, was skiing the Bushwackers at concrete-hard groomers, which is what the artificial snow was like in the first 2-3 hours in the morning. It was hard to engage the ski on edge and it felt out of place on hard surface. I could be heard on half of the mountain too, as they roared on these hard groomers. But as the snow got just a tad softer, I was easily one of the happier people on the slopes.

 

Overall, these are easy and fun skis, which definately are going to cover a lot of terrain. They are by no means soft for what they are intended to, but they could definately make a longer version, as 180cm doesn't feel that long at all.

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