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Food Fuel on the Mountain

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Since discovering Epic Ski recently, I have enjoyed the diversity of topics and personalities on this site. That noted, I am wondering what are some favorite FOOD FUEL's that are carried in backpacks , etc. when on the mountain. Do you stop and eat a full meal in the lodge or car?  Bars for fuel?  Snack on the ride up?  Thanks in advance for sharing!

post #2 of 24

I'm a pack a sandwhich in the pocket, eat on the way up, kinda guy. But most of the people I ski with (both actually, and generally out on the mountain) are the stop and eat 10 pounds of pork/heaviness, down a weissbier, eat some weisswurst, and pass out for two hours during lunch...

 

Good, thin, home-made ham/turkey sandwhich in each cargo pocket of my pants (in foil). Perhaps an orange in a jacket pocket, landjager in the other. Couple of those little wax-covered cheese things. I eat that on the way up. 

 

Breakfast is some combination of: hard boiled egg, yogurt + steel cut oats, pretzels (the big Bavarian kind). 

 

And once in a while I get dragged to the lodge at lunch, and then, maaaaaaybe some Tiroler Grostl, or spätzle.

 

But back in the day-- back in America, back when I was a bit younger-- it was two packs of starburst in my pocket, and a bowl of nasty lodge-chili for lunch. I do miss that nasty lodge chili...

post #3 of 24
Any kind of meat will make your body use energy for digestion. Pack complex carbohydrates, whole grains, fruits, veggies and even bean. They are also low in fat.
post #4 of 24

I don't believe in stopping for lunch - big waste of my lift ticket. I either eat a big breakfast and wait until the day's over to eat again or I bring a pocket sandwhich/snack. Energy bars can be difficult to swallow, especially when cold, but I've found Probars to be soft and palatable. They also taste good. Lots of fiber, though eek.gif

post #5 of 24

My local grocery chain makes these $2 mini-hoagies with different meats and cheeses.  Perfect amount of food and perfect size for camelbak stuffing.  Sometimes it's flat by the time I dig it out to eat but I kind of like it better that way.

post #6 of 24

Love the flat sandwich on the gondola up. Hate wasting time-- and money-- stopping for lunch. 

 

Just have to convince the people I ski with to start thinking the same way...

post #7 of 24
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

I don't believe in stopping for lunch - big waste of my lift ticket. I either eat a big breakfast and wait until the day's over to eat again or I bring a pocket sandwhich/snack. Energy bars can be difficult to swallow, especially when cold, but I've found Probars to be soft and palatable. They also taste good. Lots of fiber, though eek.gif



Damn right.  Think about how much time we spend on the lifts.  That's where i choose to eat my snacks.  As for energy bars, put it in your pants pocket (if you have any inside your ski pants) for 20 min, they will be soft.

post #9 of 24


Our favorite on mountain snack foods and ski meals

 

Mine's beef jerkey and a platypus full of water.

post #10 of 24

and the benefit of meat as a quick energy boost is: _________________
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Any kind of meat will make your body use energy for digestion. Pack complex carbohydrates, whole grains, fruits, veggies and even bean. They are also low in fat.


 



Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



Our favorite on mountain snack foods and ski meals

 

Mine's beef jerkey and a platypus full of water.



 

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

and the benefit of meat as a quick energy boost is: _________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Any kind of meat will make your body use energy for digestion. Pack complex carbohydrates, whole grains, fruits, veggies and even bean. They are also low in fat.




Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



Our favorite on mountain snack foods and ski meals

Mine's beef jerkey and a platypus full of water.




You don't get quick energy from meat, it takes up to an hour to digest meat. Dried fruit is probably the best for quick energy.
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

and the benefit of meat as a quick energy boost is: _________________
 



 



 



- lasts for hours

- not limited to 300 calories per hour absorption rate (and everything else turning to gas)

- doesn't trigger an insulin spike

- provides ready protein for muscle rebuilding once skiing stops

 

post #13 of 24

a lot of this depends on your metabolism and your fitness level (which corresponds with your ski technique and work output). 

If you're a teenager going all out and a novice skier you're going to hit a wall.  As you become more efficient (and perhaps a slower metabolism), you find you won't overdo yourself and bonk out.

 

I think your general strategies for any long endurance sport will be the same  (hr+ biking or hiking)

post #14 of 24

I do baggies full of nuts and dried fruit that I eat on the lift mostly. I stop for a sandwich (that I bring with me) and water for 15 minutes or so when I go into the lodge to use the rest room.

post #15 of 24

I've gotten a taste for "Kind" bars, which are nuts+fruits+honey over the Lara bars, my previous favorite. They break apart nicely when cold and have a good mixture of simple+complex carbs and protein. I love the PB+Nutella suggestion, will have to make some sandwiches with that, perhaps going roasted almond butter + Nutella.

post #16 of 24

My biggest problem is that I always get home a bit dehydrated. Same thing happens when I go out for 6+ hrs of cycling (except I usually stop three times for that... and drink ~2 liters of good bavarian beer.)

 

As for the discussion above about going all out as a teen or a novice compared to being skilled and efficient (I assume you mean both in skills/style and metabolically)-- I don't know. I think it depends on HOW one skis. I'm not satisfied just finding my rhythm (though that's fun for part of the day); I need to find the edge of what I can handle, each time I go out, whether absolutely, or for the given part of the day. 

 

I almost always finish a long day very fatigued, but I don't get sore muscles after the second day of the season. That's just how my physiology has always worked (I'm 29... I expect that to change): first one or two times out, I get delayed-onset muscle soreness. After that, I don't get sore again. Same goes with cycling (or lifting or Tabata-like intervals). But I do get muscle fatigue by the end of the day, and I usually hit that point at which I know my form is starting to falter, and I'm more prone to injury (last time out, I fell once, off-piste... on my second to last run). 

 

My point is: I think SOME people, when they become experts, hit a point where they ski well within their sustainable skill/metabolic efficiency band all day long. For these folks, it's more of an endurance sport (AKA aerobic or pre-aerobic activity). Other people, when they become experts, constantly push their skill/metabolic boundaries in ways that brings them outside the sustainable regime, and hit a wall of fatigue almost every time out. For these folks, there are aspects of an endurance sport-- but also aspects of sprint-to-fatigue and other interval-training-like activities (AKA aerobic background with anaerobic periods). There's no "right" way of enjoying skiing.

 

But when we're talking about day-of nutrition, it's important to remember that we all enjoy this sport in different ways. And that individual bodies have wide variances at all levels of function (from psychological to metabolic).  

post #17 of 24

I'm not hardcore enough to not stop for lunch, I like a nice sit down and refuel time.

post #18 of 24

You don't want to get between me and my lunch (or breakfast, brunch, dinner or late night feed)

 

I ALWAYS stop for a 30min lunch in the lodge...life is too short to miss a meal  biggrin.gif

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

You don't want to get between me and my lunch (or breakfast, brunch, dinner or late night feed)

 

I ALWAYS stop for a 30min lunch in the lodge...life is too short to miss a meal  biggrin.gif



I often eat in the car, listen to tunes, and change out the skis for a different afternoon ride.  assuming I have a good parking spot.  If not then it is the lodge and same skis all day.

post #20 of 24

I generally bring some sustenance with me on the hill and if I'm not influenced by friends I usually skip the lodge scene.  However, I very rarely bring anything out of my pockets on the lift.  I prefer to find a cool spot on the mountain to eat or ski down to my car and hang there for awhile.   For me a substantial breakfast is important.  After that it more or less snacks until dinner.

 

One of my regular ski partners was addressing this last time we skied bumps all day together.  He just does not understand stopping for lunch.  He says it's like doing half your workout then stopping to stuff yourself then immediately doing the other half of your workout.

 

Oh, and I like to consume plenty of protein and a few complex carbs during the ski day.  Simple carbs I try to avoid.  I think it's a good idea to carry water but it seems I rarely do.  I do keep a few Nalgenes in the car and I usually know where to find fountains on the hill.  If all else fails, I have no compunction about eating some fresh snow.

post #21 of 24

I used to be "famous" for pulling out a flattened tunafish sandwich on the lift.  Eat half on one lift; wait an hour; eat the other half on another.  Ski non-stop.  Now I'm 57, don't get enough ski days in to be in shape, and need a break.

 

post #22 of 24

mmm.    Flattened tunafish with hot peppers, onions and pickle, mmmm.

 

 

nom nom nom nom.

 

 

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

My biggest problem is that I always get home a bit dehydrated. Same thing happens when I go out for 6+ hrs of cycling (except I usually stop three times for that... and drink ~2 liters of good bavarian beer.)

 

Dehydration + beer, sound like a recipe for kidney stones.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

Dehydration + beer, sound like a recipe for kidney stones.



Tell that to a hasher, or any amateur athlete here in Munich... and you'd be laughed right over the border to Austria. 

 

In all seriousness: Some people are much more susceptible to kidney stones than others. But for many (or most), being moderately dehydrated and quenching one's thirst with beer (I'm not talking 7 to 10% double IPAs and death-bed dehydration) really doesn't present a problem. 

 

And anyway, if you're worried about calcium oxalate kidney stones caused by dehydration, I'd cut the spinach, black tea, and chocolate before the beer.

 

Millions of amateur athletes here drink copious quantities of hells lager during a hot day of activity... and they aren't all shooting pebbles. 

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