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K2 Aftershock vs Volkl Kendo.

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

For those of you who have tried both (or know extensively about both), which would you say is a better true "ALL-mountain" ski?

 

The lack of tip-rocker in the kendo concerns me for crud, powder, bumps, and slush.

post #2 of 19
Some people ski crud, chop, slush, mashed potatoes, reef, and all other kinds of snow without rockered tips. You can always play with edge sharpness and bevel if you like everything else about a ski. Or you could ski the Kendo and see if you like it, rather than speculating based on what e-sprayers are spraying.biggrin.gif
post #3 of 19

I'll add my e-spray.  I didn't think these two skis were even remotely similar.  I'm bigger, 6'3", 230 lbs and I felt like I easily overpowered the Aftershocks on groomers.  Had them in the trees and they did better there.  Don't remember if I ski'd them in crud at all, but I didn't ski them long because they just didn't click with me personally.

 

I ended up buying the Kendo, ski'd it all last season and never wanted for anything more.  It rips groomers and anything else up to boot deep perfectly fine.  Next year's is getting tip-rocker, but probably won't make too much difference.  

 

If you're an ice-coaster and like a stiffer ski, the Kendo is a great ski, but I'm sure you will get many opinions here of ski's which are even better, like the Kastle MX88's.

 

 

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

I'll add my e-spray.  I didn't think these two skis were even remotely similar.  I'm bigger, 6'3", 230 lbs and I felt like I easily overpowered the Aftershocks on groomers.  Had them in the trees and they did better there.  Don't remember if I ski'd them in crud at all, but I didn't ski them long because they just didn't click with me personally.

 

I ended up buying the Kendo, ski'd it all last season and never wanted for anything more.  It rips groomers and anything else up to boot deep perfectly fine.  Next year's is getting tip-rocker, but probably won't make too much difference.  

 

If you're an ice-coaster and like a stiffer ski, the Kendo is a great ski, but I'm sure you will get many opinions here of ski's which are even better, like the Kastle MX88's.

 

 



Thanks alot, this was helpful feedback.

 

I am 50 lbs and 8 inches shorter than you however nonono2.gif

 

But I've asked people on the lift of all sizes and shapes and any I've seen on Kendos love them.

 

Not sure I've EVER seen an Aftershock anywhere.  Maybe that says something right there.

post #5 of 19


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



Thanks alot, this was helpful feedback.

 

I am 50 lbs and 8 inches shorter than you however nonono2.gif

 

But I've asked people on the lift of all sizes and shapes and any I've seen on Kendos love them.

 

Not sure I've EVER seen an Aftershock anywhere.  Maybe that says something right there.



 

That should only really make much difference in terms of the length you choose.  I'm on 184s, you'll probably be looking at 170ish unless you prefer longer skis.

 

But yeah, Kendos were the darling ski of the 2011 season on forums and ski review sites-- much like Blizzard's Flipcore series is this year.

 

They are very good skis.!

post #6 of 19

I second the Demo suggestion and see which you like.   If you are aggressive you will probably like the Kendo better.   Worth Demoing both.  

post #7 of 19

6' 1" 225 lbs. I ski a 189 cm 2010 K2 Kung Fujas (95 waist, rocker tip/tail, flexible ski, carves well but is not terrible precise, likes to be thrown at powder and crud HARD with an anything goes approach).

 

I have a 2007 set of K2 Apache Recons, which is a similar type of ski to the aftershocks. I've really, really fallen out of favor with the Recons, because they get pushed all over in crud (they won't track a turn- if the snow consistency changes, ie they hit a lump of crud, they will change course and really throw me off), yet also have very vague edge feel on hard snow, and actually pretty sucky edge grip. I can carve railroad tracks on the Fujas all day, yet the Recons only really want to carve in soft packed snow conditions that my grandmother could carve on 150cm straight skis.

 

Demoing the Aftershock basically felt like the same type of ski as the recon. I got on it and rolled it right bac to the demo guy after a run.

 

Demoing the Kendo was a different world. It had greater edge precision and hold than any of the 30 some demo skis I tried, and I stuck many a frontside ski on my boot when nothing else was available. The Kendos were amazing, and felt perfectly dialed in to cut hard arcs and manage chopped up snow.

 

The only thing keeping me back from wanting a pair is that I really don't think the width is quite enough for a West Coast ski, but if I was skiing in an area with less snow, I'd own the Kendo.  The Gotamas are more in line in dimensions with a West Coast 1 quiver ski, but, while I liked the goats, they didn't feel nearly as snappy.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

I'm wondering if the width and rock-solid construction of the Kendos make them good enough for coral reef and fresh crud/packed-powder, or if having rocker is really the X-factor that makes said conditions a breeze.

 

I don't want to have this awesome ski I need to lean back on to prevent tip-hookage in the junk (thus a benefit of tip-rocker).

post #9 of 19

I am about the same dimensions as you and I will be skiing the Kendo's this week at Vail and will get back to you on how that turns out.  

 

I do own a pair of Kastle FX84s.  I love those skis and I didn't have any problems with them when I took them to Tahoe and skied everything from groomers to fresh powder in the backcountry. On the other hand, I did find that due to the crappy winter in PA and NY I ended up skiing on a pair of Fischer Progressor 9+'s till they delaminated.  What are you looking at the Kendo's and the Aftershocks for?

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Risen29463 View Post

I am about the same dimensions as you and I will be skiing the Kendo's this week at Vail and will get back to you on how that turns out.  

 

I do own a pair of Kastle FX84s.  I love those skis and I didn't have any problems with them when I took them to Tahoe and skied everything from groomers to fresh powder in the backcountry. On the other hand, I did find that due to the crappy winter in PA and NY I ended up skiing on a pair of Fischer Progressor 9+'s till they delaminated.  What are you looking at the Kendo's and the Aftershocks for?



Basically a ski I use EVERY DAY I don't have a beer league or other local race where I want to use a race-specific ski.

post #11 of 19

The Kendo is an awsome ski for the east. I am 5' 9" 150 and I ski the 170. Could handle the 177 but there is no need for me as the 170 is plenty stable and rarely do I need the extra float in powder as I prefer the extra nimbleness for the trees. It feels very light underfoot and I personally do not feel that it is demanding at all. I came from using a Blizzard 7.0 xpressor-ti (basically a 70mm ski with alot of metal) and the Kendo seems much more playful

post #12 of 19

So much for reporting back.  Ended up on a pair of Head Peak 84s.  Sorry.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Risen29463 View Post

So much for reporting back.  Ended up on a pair of Head Peak 84s.  Sorry.



That's cool.  Did you like them?

post #14 of 19

I did.  They were a very nice do it all ski.  They did very well on the groomed and very well in the back bowls.  I was skiing knee deep powder for 2 days straight biggrin.gif.  I did feel that my FX 84s were more nimble though and missed them.  Good ski.  It supposedly had an early rise tip, but I couldn't really tell.  I would definitely recommend that you demo them if you can.

post #15 of 19

I think what the hang-up here is that the Aftershock is a "rockered" ski while the Volkl is not. 

 

In reality, the amount of rocker on the Aftershock is very, very mild. In my opinion, it exists on the ski primarily as a marketing tool, because the industry has managed to condition people that rockered skis are the future, and every ski benefits from rocker.  At best, the aftershock rocker helps catching the tips on hard snow. I doubt it has much effect at all on soft snow- there just isn't enough to markedly change things. 

 

Rocker profiles can be awesome, but adding rocker to a ski that just wasn't that good of a ski to begin with just makes a not-very good ski with a rockered tip.

 

The Kendos are GREAT skis for what they are- an all-mountain ski for people who will really tend to use them on harder snow.

 

I'm a K2 guy. I have about 15 pairs of skis, most of them are K2. Most of my ski days are done on K2 skis. My favorite skis right now are the Obsethed and the Kung Fujas, and the Fujas is my everyday ski. On the flipside, I have exactly one pair of Volkl's in my collection, a pair of 2004ish 5-star Supersports.

 

I like K2. I don't dislike Volkl, but I tend to like the way K2's stuff handles over Volkl stuff.

 

And I can say, without a doubt, I would jump at the chance to ski a Kendo on a hard-snow day over any other ski. If I can find one for a few hundred bucks that I can use as a hard snow ski, I would jump on it.

 

But if somebody gave me a pair of aftershocks, I'd sell them.

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I think what the hang-up here is that the Aftershock is a "rockered" ski while the Volkl is not. 

 

In reality, the amount of rocker on the Aftershock is very, very mild. In my opinion, it exists on the ski primarily as a marketing tool, because the industry has managed to condition people that rockered skis are the future, and every ski benefits from rocker.  At best, the aftershock rocker helps catching the tips on hard snow. I doubt it has much effect at all on soft snow- there just isn't enough to markedly change things. 

 

Rocker profiles can be awesome, but adding rocker to a ski that just wasn't that good of a ski to begin with just makes a not-very good ski with a rockered tip.

 

The Kendos are GREAT skis for what they are- an all-mountain ski for people who will really tend to use them on harder snow.

 

I'm a K2 guy. I have about 15 pairs of skis, most of them are K2. Most of my ski days are done on K2 skis. My favorite skis right now are the Obsethed and the Kung Fujas, and the Fujas is my everyday ski. On the flipside, I have exactly one pair of Volkl's in my collection, a pair of 2004ish 5-star Supersports.

 

I like K2. I don't dislike Volkl, but I tend to like the way K2's stuff handles over Volkl stuff.

 

And I can say, without a doubt, I would jump at the chance to ski a Kendo on a hard-snow day over any other ski. If I can find one for a few hundred bucks that I can use as a hard snow ski, I would jump on it.

 

But if somebody gave me a pair of aftershocks, I'd sell them.


Got mine for $300 w/ demo griffon bindings on ebay- last years demo and were in great (only cosmetic chipping on topsheet) condition.

 

post #17 of 19

I'm 5'11" 180 lbs and started sking the Kendo in a 170 this season in the east.  It's been pretty fantastic for the conditions we've had but I havent had a real powder day beyond a few inches at Wildcat.  In the last few years I've been skiing the K2 Hardside, K2 PEs and the Legend 8000.  I prefer the Kendo to all of these so far in the conditions I've skied.  I've got a feeling they'll handle just fine in a foot of powder.

post #18 of 19

Last year, I spent a day demoing the Aftershock and Kendo at Big Sky and ended up buying a pair of Kendo.  The Kendo felt lighter, more precise, and quicker than the Aftershocks.  This year, I bought a pair of Mantras.  Honestly, the 2012 Mantra surpass the Kendo in every way.  They feel quicker (rocker tip,) bust through crud better (10 mm wider,) and hold on hard pack very well (0.5/3.0 tune.)  As others have said, try to demo before you buy.

post #19 of 19

I ski 2010 Recons, which I believe had been redesigned from prior versions and the year before the aftershock.  I ski a 3 degree edge and hold well in the ice and crud here inthe Poconos.  A former Burke Mt  Academy guy I know had aftershocks before he delaminated them.  Liked them but he said the tip was a little soft when he pushed them.   


Edited by handhdad - 2/20/12 at 7:12pm
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