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Lost feeling in toe.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

So, after a long (7 hr) day of lessons, with about 75% hiking, my ill-fitting boots (currently looking for new ones) caused my toes to fall asleep. The feeling rapidly returned to 9 of them, but after 2 days, I still have no feeling in one toe (just numbness). Has anyone else had this?

post #2 of 16
Two days? If I were you I'd go to a doc now, actually I would've gone a lot earlier.
post #3 of 16

I had it happen a few weeks ago after skiing on a brutally cold day.  I figured it was frostnip or something.  At any rate, I went to see the doc after three or four days; the receptionist absolutely flipped out that I didn't go seek medical attention immediately.  Got in to see the doc, he said it wasn't frostbite, take ibuprofen to reduce some minor swelling he saw.  Problem went away in a few days.

 

That said -- yeah, go see the doctor.

post #4 of 16

Go to the doctor. 

 

Maybe google "Christmas Toe" although I think that is more often associated with repeated impact than toes falling asleep (constricted circulation?)

 

 

post #5 of 16

not skier related, but a friend in college got waaaay too drunk one time and passed out sleeping on his arm.  Woke up the next day and basically had a permanantly fallen asleep arm.  

Was some kind of nerve damage and basically had to have his arm was in a sling for several weeks until he was able to regain feeling in his fingers.

 

Point being, maybe just taking some nsaids will work, but there is also the potential of something worse and needing some expert opinion to check it out.  Oh and also don't get blackout drunk and pass out on your arm

post #6 of 16

If it's nerve damage then there's not much you can do to accelerate the healing process. Pretty much you have to just wait and see if your body heals itself, and that can take a year to restore feeling.

post #7 of 16

Holy crap.  I've definitely had the wake up and my arm is a little numb from sleeping on it feeling - I didn't need to hear this.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

not skier related, but a friend in college got waaaay too drunk one time and passed out sleeping on his arm.  Woke up the next day and basically had a permanantly fallen asleep arm.  

Was some kind of nerve damage and basically had to have his arm was in a sling for several weeks until he was able to regain feeling in his fingers.

 

Point being, maybe just taking some nsaids will work, but there is also the potential of something worse and needing some expert opinion to check it out.  Oh and also don't get blackout drunk and pass out on your arm



 

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Holy crap.  I've definitely had the wake up and my arm is a little numb from sleeping on it feeling - I didn't need to hear this.
 



 


Yeah. Scary. My shoulders subluxate (slip in and out of joint or partially dislocate), so I have to be careful not to fall asleep on my stomach with my arms above my head. That causes real problems. Usually have number fingers the next morning if I do. I'm afraid of the nerve/shoulder damage it can cause.

 

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Holy crap.  I've definitely had the wake up and my arm is a little numb from sleeping on it feeling - I didn't need to hear this.
 



 



Your body did what it was supposed to do and made you wake up so you could move around and get the feeling back in your arm. No big deal. That friend in college that was inebriated did not wake up like he was supposed when his arm fell asleep because he was passed out drunk.

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

If it's nerve damage then there's not much you can do to accelerate the healing process. Pretty much you have to just wait and see if your body heals itself, and that can take a year to restore feeling.



This. Guessing from the user ID toecutter is a podiatrist. Listen to him--there's nothing a doc can do for you. There's nothing you can do but wait. BTW have you ever been frostbitten in the past?  Previously frostbitten parts will always be very cold sensitive (although it sounds like your problem was pressure.) Over the years I met some fascinating patients with post-frostbite symptoms--a veteran of the Bulge, another of Chosin Reservoir (Korean War) , an Indian veteran who had been in the Himalyas fighting the Chinese in the 60's, and a Sierra Pacific Lineman.  Also a veteran who had similar problems after a bad fungus infection he got on the Bataan Death March. A privilege to meet people like that.

post #11 of 16

I had a whole foot go asleep in ill fitting too-tight boots.  The numbness started at the shin and went all the way down to my toes.  The feeling mostly came back by the next morning, but there was still a vague tingling in my foot.  It was as if my foot was asleep and spent the next few weeks trying to wake up.  I saw a doctor that Monday who told me that there was nothing to do but wait for feeling to return, and that the tingling was probably a positive sign.  

 

The feeling came back after a few weeks.

 

 

post #12 of 16

My left big toe is in a state of 24/7 numbness right now.  I've been having problems with that toe box and have gotten it stretched several times.  I'm not too worried about it, but would like to have sensation back at some point.  I'm certainly not going to stop skiing over it!  I'm on track to do well over 100 days this season.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

I just put a deposit on a new pair of boots, Full Tilt Hot Doggers, so I'll have them paid off by the end of this season. Hopefully next season will be pain-free with a much better fitting boot.

post #14 of 16


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

not skier related, but a friend in college got waaaay too drunk one time and passed out sleeping on his arm.  Woke up the next day and basically had a permanantly fallen asleep arm.  

Was some kind of nerve damage and basically had to have his arm was in a sling for several weeks until he was able to regain feeling in his fingers.

 

Point being, maybe just taking some nsaids will work, but there is also the potential of something worse and needing some expert opinion to check it out.  Oh and also don't get blackout drunk and pass out on your arm



I would never doubt anyone or suggest in any way that this might be an urban legend, but when I was in high school in the late seventies, my friend had a friend who had the exact same thing happen to him.  And another friend I had in college had a friend and his friend had the same thing happen to him.  In all cases the victim passed out drunk and awoke with a dead arm.

 

I fact, if you go to any bar and look carefully, you can see that most of the drunks have a dead arm or two.

 

On a more serious note, you can get nerve damage from frostbite.  The tip of my right big toe was partially numb for many months after a particularly cold day.  The doctor said there was not much he could do and that feeling would eventually return, which it mostly did.  That spot still gets numb pretty quick though when it gets cold.

 

Bottom line, when your toes get cold don't tough it out, go inside and warm them.  If you are an Instructor and can't get inside, get a pro form and buy some Hotronics.

 

 

post #15 of 16

Not ski related, but in college I played a very heavy instrument in the University Wind Ensemble.  I played it only on Monday and Wednesday for two-hour rehearsals (I used my own instruments on other days) and it made my thumb numb after the Wed. rehearsal every week.  It took until sometime in the weekend for it to wake up again.  This went on for an entire academic year.  I did not enjoy this, but I have no permanent damage from it.  Sounds kind of like the problem with your toes.

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by srbarry View Post


 



I would never doubt anyone or suggest in any way that this might be an urban legend, but when I was in high school in the late seventies, my friend had a friend who had the exact same thing happen to him.  And another friend I had in college had a friend and his friend had the same thing happen to him.  In all cases the victim passed out drunk and awoke with a dead arm.

 

I fact, if you go to any bar and look carefully, you can see that most of the drunks have a dead arm or two.

 

On a more serious note, you can get nerve damage from frostbite.  The tip of my right big toe was partially numb for many months after a particularly cold day.  The doctor said there was not much he could do and that feeling would eventually return, which it mostly did.  That spot still gets numb pretty quick though when it gets cold.

 

Bottom line, when your toes get cold don't tough it out, go inside and warm them.  If you are an Instructor and can't get inside, get a pro form and buy some Hotronics.

 

 

Not urban legend at all--there used to be a "honeymoon syndrome" --guy would fall asleep with his new brides head on his arm and stay that way all night--not wanting to disturb her when he woke in the middle of the night in pain.  It could take months for the arm to wake up.  Times have changed.
 

 

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