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Lange RX 130 Opinions - Page 3

post #61 of 80

Just an update for the Rossignol version of this boot. 

 

I had added a very thin piece of weatherstripping along the opening under the buckles.

It seemed to solve all my leaking problems, however I doubt it will last very long.  Using a heated bootbag in the AM caused the adhesive to loosen and the weatherstripping was moving all over the place.  I was able to force it back in, but doesn't look like a permanent fix. Might need to try a bead of silicone.

 

post #62 of 80
Like what you've done and will try that myself, as my Chinook boot dryer uses only room temperature forced air, with no heating to potentially adversely affect foam and/or adhesives. Up to 28 days on the boots this season and the only issue is this leak. Now I just need to get to the hardware store for some thin closed cell foam self-adhesive weatherstrip...
post #63 of 80

Rather Play Than Work,

Maybe instead of silicon, use a glue that handles temperature changes tot he extreme better th_dunno-1[1].gif.  At least warmer temps since that is when it seems you are having an issue. 

 

Ken

post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Rather Play Than Work,

Maybe instead of silicon, use a glue that handles temperature changes tot he extreme better th_dunno-1[1].gif.  At least warmer temps since that is when it seems you are having an issue. 

 

Ken

That will be my next step.  I wanted to make sure sealing that gap solved the problem in the first place before getting too messy with glue. I had the weatherstripping laying around so it was a 20 second experement.  It also might not have worked well since the weatherstripping I have is at least 6 years old and the adhesive might be shot to begin with.

post #65 of 80

always shoegoo. best stuff ever.

post #66 of 80

The 3M clear duct tape started to come off after about 4 ski days, so I just switched to black "Gorilla Tape" from the Gorilla Glue people. Seems like black duct tape but with very sticky glue.

 

The duct tape on the toe dam reduced the leaking by around half, with the remaining half now coming in thru the overlap by the 1st and 2nd buckles. I just slipped some thin self-stick grey high density foam weatherstrip (sticky side up) into the overlap to try that out.

 

I think it's going to be pretty much impossible to get a bead of silicone sealant or stiffer yet shoe goo into the overlap and only stuck to one side of the overlap (since the overlap needs to spread apart to get my feet in and out).

 

1000

post #67 of 80

Tried skiing with the weatherstrip filled overlaps today, and it was unfortunately disapointing. One boot is dry inside and the other is wetter than before?!? Inconsistent at best...

post #68 of 80
I don't have these boots but with regards to boots leaking, instead of trying to seal and tape them, can't you just use boot gloves? Seems like it would be a bit easier.
post #69 of 80

I think that the issue, at least for me, is that I usually let off the first two buckles when riding the lift - the boot glove (the ones I have seen) make that impractical.

post #70 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

I don't have these boots but with regards to boots leaking, instead of trying to seal and tape them, can't you just use boot gloves? Seems like it would be a bit easier.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by givethepigeye View Post

I think that the issue, at least for me, is that I usually let off the first two buckles when riding the lift - the boot glove (the ones I have seen) make that impractical.

 

I know lots of folks do this and I tend to ski at least the morning with my boots completely unbuckled (just the booster strap), BUT, that is a choice and if you have to do this, you should consider adjusting how they fit.  I assure you I understand the value of a tight fitting boot.  I can't even wear a sock inside my boots.  If you have to loosen them, you should do something about that first.

 

Also, with all these modifications, why not just modify the boot glove to accommodate getting at the buckles.   It covers the buckles for warmth but you want to prevent leaking.  Cut out around the buckles and they won't be as warm but they probably won't leak either.

 

JMO,

Ken

post #71 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

I don't have these boots but with regards to boots leaking, instead of trying to seal and tape them, can't you just use boot gloves? Seems like it would be a bit easier.

 

Tried them on a really cold day last season with another ski boot and they were a real pain to deal with, since they don't fit consistently around the front of the boot which then is inconsistent with the binding toe, forward pressure, etc. Had to fiddle with them constantly every time I was stepping in - until I finally gave up and took them off altogether. Not just me, as two people I loaned them to had issues with their bindings as well. I have also asked several people with them on the lift line what they thought, and they all had the same issue but they needed the extra warmth and were willing to fiddle around with them - and they were a better option for them than electric heaters.

 

My feet rarely get cold. Right now it's a lot easier for me to put the boots on my drier each night and pull the liners every 3-4 ski days for a full drying out. I'm at 32 ski days so far this season...

post #72 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

 

Tried them on a really cold day last season with another ski boot and they were a real pain to deal with, since they don't fit consistently around the front of the boot which then is inconsistent with the binding toe, forward pressure, etc. Had to fiddle with them constantly every time I was stepping in - until I finally gave up and took them off altogether. Not just me, as two people I loaned them to had issues with their bindings as well. I have also asked several people with them on the lift line what they thought, and they all had the same issue but they needed the extra warmth and were willing to fiddle around with them - and they were a better option for them than electric heaters.

 

My feet rarely get cold. Right now it's a lot easier for me to put the boots on my drier each night and pull the liners every 3-4 ski days for a full drying out. I'm at 32 ski days so far this season...

 

I don't disagree with them being annoying and I think it odd that they didn't think through them getting in the way of the binding.  On mine, I trimmed them at the toe so they don't interfere with the binding.  I just click in without having to check now. 

 

The buckle part is another issue but like I mentioned in an earlier post, just cut a hole for the buckle to pop through. 

 

I put mine on the boot dryer every night whether I wear the boot glove or not as the seem to get mighty wet from sweat.  I think it's because I wear a sock liner and no sock.

 

Another issue is the strap across the bottom wears out.  When I noticed mine getting thin, I added a few layers of duct tape to it.

 

Yup, they aren't perfect but compared to all the issues they can prevent (with a little modification), well worth it.

post #73 of 80
Thread Starter 

The last time I had my 130's out I noticed that some snow was entering around the toe area.  My toes were pretty cold by the end of the day.  So I called Lange to enquire about any possible solutions and was told by the agent that she had not heard of any issues like this with these boots.  She even went as far as to contact their repair/warranty department and asked them and they also stated they never heard of such an issue. 
 

So my question is...who should I be calling in the event I do want to do a Warranty claim?

 

Thanks

Brian

post #74 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiscoskier View Post

The last time I had my 130's out I noticed that some snow was entering around the toe area.  My toes were pretty cold by the end of the day.  So I called Lange to enquire about any possible solutions and was told by the agent that she had not heard of any issues like this with these boots.  She even went as far as to contact their repair/warranty department and asked them and they also stated they never heard of such an issue. 
 

So my question is...who should I be calling in the event I do want to do a Warranty claim?

 

 

The people you talked to were either completely out of the loop and/or possibly new at the company, or just out-right lying to you.  I actually had a pleasant experience with Lange's repairs and warranty department, as described earlier in this thread.

post #75 of 80
Thread Starter 

I am thinking the latter.  Does anyone have the contact info for Lange USA Warranties?

post #76 of 80

Try this: (888) 243-6722

post #77 of 80

An update on my Lange RX 130 Leakers.  As reported here and elsewhere on EpicSki, I returned mine at the end of last season.  My new pair, though much better still leaks.  The build date on my box was 4/12 so it should have been the production that supposedly addressed this issue.  I am able to notice a few other production changes to the power strap and liner, but the bastards still leak.  It is a real shame as I truly believe that these boots fit my odd feet well and have about the best on snow performance of any boot that I have ever experienced.  A real shame that Lange can not get a handle on this.  I have also heard that their sister company Rossignol who shares the same basic shell and liner of the RX series with their Sensor series are having leak issues as well.

 

It really sucks to have this kind of issue with a top shelf boot.

 

Rick G

post #78 of 80
My RS130's (similar) don't leak and haven't after 2.5 years of hard use. There's always duct tape.


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post #79 of 80
Another update after 38 days in the Rossi Experience 130:

Packing out a bit in the forefoot area so I installed full length Bontex shims between my boot boards and my liners (immediately under my liners). Boots now feel tight again and the extra pressure up and into the overlap region between the first and second buckles seems to have stopped the leaking there!!!
post #80 of 80

Final modification to the Rossi version to stop the leaks.

 

Not sure if this will work on the Langes but I believe the lowers are the same.

 

I took the instep flap and reversed it. You will see how they put a large lip on the inside flap. I think this was to stop the leaking, but it actually causes the gap where snow enters.  I used a razor to remove the lip completely. Once the instep flap was reversed back to normal, there was no longer a gap at all. Tested it out today and it was the first time my socks weren't wet after skiing.  

 

I never used duct tape since it always appeared that the moisture was coming in between the 1st and 2nd buckles.

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