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2012 Blizzard Bonafide and Kastle BMX98 video reviews

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

 

2012 Ski Reviews:

 

Blizzard Bonafide and Kastle BMX98

Lengths tested: Bonafide 180cm, BMX98 178cm

Conditions for this review: heavy, beat down cratered wind pack, junky crud, buffed out wind pack. Fairly challenging snow, really demanding for skis and for skiers. Also posted a video of the BMX98 in better snow conditions.  Notice that I am skiing it much more dynamically, feet more active.  Just goes to show you what pretty good snow vs. not great snow does to ski technique for mere mortals like me. 

 

Blizzard Bonafide 180cm: fairly stout ski, long low rocker tip and tail, not much tip or tail flex, 2 sheets of metal, 98mm underfoot

Kastle BMX98 178cm: bit more camber underfoot, shorter and lower rocker tip and tail, much softer flex pattern at the tip and tail.

 

Skier info:

5 foot 9, 155lbs male

Will ski 25-40 days this year, most likely

Solid all-mountain skier, skis 85-95% off piste

Skis I own: Kastle MX78, Kastle FX94, Volkl Kendo, Volkl Katana, Elan Olympus Mons, Kastle MX128

Own or demo: These are both the shop's skis, so I have skied them multiple times.

 

Review and comparison:

 

Steep junky snow; cratered wind pack: This pitch was the most challenging for the skis, and the skier. It is a steep pitch (well over 40 degrees) and tricky snow (we saw a guy go down at the top, right after we skied the pitch, and he lost 800 vertical feet before stopping. He was probably sliding for 30 seconds. It was a bad fall: he was headed toward a group of big boulders at 30mph on his back and somehow narrowly missed them by a few feet). Anyways gives you an idea of how firm the snow was.  I wasn't skiing either particularly well, due to low confidence in the snow conditions.  Felt pretty static on either ski. 

 

Bonafide: I struggled on this ski in the steep wind pack. This is a very stiff ski: the tip was not “getting out of the way” (Ignore the bad skiing, conditions sucked and I am not a rock-star skier at any rate). I had trouble exiting the turn; the tip was just a lot of work, and I was having to muscle the ski, rather than letting the energy of the turn release me and pull me down the fall line. Tail was pretty stiff as well: I just didn't trust it, as if I got back there, I would end up getting jacked. Ski was too stiff for me in these shorter turns.

 

BMX98: Much better. After the first couple of tentative turns (I had just jumped on the ski and ridden up the lift, no warm up on it), I am skiing with much more dynamic movements, carrying energy from turn to turn much better on that ski. Still not great skiing; not as active with the feet as I need to be, or as much progressive edge angle as I would like, but still much more solid. Tip on the BMX98 was much surfier in the junk than the bonafide (much softer tip, flexed much more) and the tail was more forgiving as well. I am getting out of the snow and down the hill with my ski tips on it. Definitely a better ski in those short steep turn in mixed conditions: I had a lot more confidence on it.

 

Open Bowl, blown-in punchy wind pack: more lower angle stuff, GS speeds, still funky snow.

 

Bonafide: Very good in these conditions. This ski is stiff, powerful, and likes speed. I still struggled with getting energy from turn to turn: I could ski it well edge to edge, but kind of felt stuck on the ski, due to lack of energy, as I wasn't able to bend it up well. When I would, the ski was so strong that it would shoot me out of the turn. Very stable at speed, no flap whatsoever, very good in these conditions, as long as you stay centered. You can see in the video that I am just letting the ski do it's thing.

 

BMX98: not quite as stable, but more active. I felt it was getting in and out of the snow better, and releasing the junk windpack with a bit more ease than the Bonafide. I felt like I could work the ski more, but on the downside, was getting a bit more tip flap. Really solid in medium radius turns, felt a bit stuck in the larger radius turns, but that was more due to the nature of the snow (not wanting to blow out a knee) than anything else). Probably more upside for me than the Bonafide here (I am not likely to gain enough weight to really flex that ski) but if I was in park and ride mode, the Bonafide is superior. You can see in the video that my turns are a little tighter and a little more active on that ski.

 

Junky skied-out crud

 

Bonafide: a bit more work in this stuff. Just a lot of ski to muscle around. Felt planky in shorter turns when I needed to turn on a dime. Not a quick ski.

 

BMX98: more at ease, still a lot of ski though. Tip was easier to get out of the turn, tail slightly more forgiving. Slightly better in tight spaces; still not my favorite, though.

 

Ice:

 

Bonafide: amazing grip for a ski this wide. I traversed across a full ice patch on a 40 degree slope, and it held like glue.

 

BMX98: a little soft for ice; needs metal and more lateral stiffness. I slipped a bit on the same ice patch.

 

Soft groomers

 

Bonafide: very solid; again, not much energy, but stable at any speed, powerful, and smooth.

 

BMX98: a little quicker, I had to ski it better (it had a little less of a tip engagement, so it required more precision) but once there, nearly on par with the Bonafide. Not as stable though.

 

New snow (not videoed here):

 

Bonafide: absolutely a blast at speed in new snow. No speed limit, super powerful, new snow really allows me to decamber the ski well and get it where I want it. Superb performer.

 

BMX98: More playful than the Bonafide, more short to medium radius oriented, likes to be more fall-line. Very good as well. If you like Super G turns at speed, the Bonafide is better. For steeper terrain and tighter turns, BMX98 is preferred.

 

Overall: both superb skis, but just quite a bit different. The Bonafide is really stout. I found it to be too much ski for shorter turns and funky snow: tip and tail were just too stiff, and it was making me work really hard. It is most fun when I have room to let it run, and don't need to be really active on the ski with my feet.  I think this ski makes the most sense for a bigger guy; several of us smaller guys who have skied it hard got pushed around.  The BMX98, having the much softer profile, released with a lot more ease and helped me out in the crappy snow. While still a strong ski, it wasn't the beast that the Bonafide was, and at my weight, stiffness of a ski makes a big difference. Not quite as fun at bigger speeds and big turns as the Bonafide, but better in mixed tough conditions for me, which is what I ski alot of-wind affected, heavy snow. I do think a profile of a Bonafide, but with a flex pattern of “The One” from Blizzard, would be just about perfect. Will look forward to trying the new softer Bonafide this week.

 

Blizzard Bonafide Video skiing (crappier snow)

 

 

 

 

Kastle BMX98 video skiing (crappier snow)

 

 

 

 

Kastle BMX98 in better snow conditions

 


Edited by dawgcatching - 2/6/12 at 10:41am

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post #2 of 29

Thanks Dawg!  Great to see how they handled there, visually speaking it made a difference.  I think for a guy my size (6'2", 200lbs) the Bonafide wouldn't push me around as much, and looks like they'd actually be very good with that stiffness.  Looks like the BMX98 would be too "bouncy" for my weight and preference.  

 

Very helpful.

post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Thanks Dawg!  Great to see how they handled there, visually speaking it made a difference.  I think for a guy my size (6'2", 200lbs) the Bonafide wouldn't push me around as much, and looks like they'd actually be very good with that stiffness.  Looks like the BMX98 would be too "bouncy" for my weight and preference.  

 

Very helpful.



Yeah, I can't stress enough how much difference weight and skiing style makes on a ski.  There are well-regarded skis out there that I have hated due to them being too stiff.  On the flipside, some skis that people seem to overpower are money for guys like me.  

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post #4 of 29

Scott....I know you have spent time on the FX94. In those rougher snow conditions, especially with bumps covered by the same type of snow, which do you think you would prefer between the BMX98 and FX94?

post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by allan o'neil View Post

Scott....I know you have spent time on the FX94. In those rougher snow conditions, especially with bumps covered by the same type of snow, which do you think you would prefer between the BMX98 and FX94?



I had just about the same question for the Inferno and the Olympus Mons in the tested conditions.

 

Great job kicking the EpicSki reviews up a notch with this video content, Scott.  icon14.gif

post #6 of 29

It's interesting you mention the stiffness of the Bonafide and your weight.  I'm 5'7" and a light (by man standards) 145lbs.  Level 7(high)/8(low) skier.  I purchased the 173 Bonafides, without demoing, this season.  I've got 8 days on them so far.  

 

I do really love the solid feel of them on groomers (flatter blues, and greens) and on icy conditions.  They rip.  They float well too for their width.  They bust crud well also. All traits a stiff ski will do.  

 

However, I'm starting to think they're not the ski for me.  I'm not a high speed groomer ripper/GS turner.  I like shorter, smaller turns, not really high speeds.  I love the trees and these things are a bear for me to manage in tight trees. Very heavy and stiff.  Compared to my 163cm Prophet 100's they feel like slow tanks that I have less control over.  Also, I was recently skiing some steep black choppy powder runs at Whistler and was trying to jump turn/lay down tight radius turns quickly and these skis just worked me over.  Very hard to manage and made me feel like I was not driving them.  I think they're just too stiff for me.  If I were an expert 8+/9 level skier at 145lbs I think they would be better... but I feel like they are currently inhibiting my progression as a skier.  While I love them out in the open and in the high speed, they're just so hard for me to manage in tight steep spots.  

 

I kind of wish I would have got the 2012 Prophet 98's.  Looks like they're my old Prophet 100's+rocker and sidewall (two things I want).  But without the Bonafide's stiffness.  Or maybe I should look into the 2012 women's model of the Bonafide with less metal?? 

 

Thoughts?

 

-Ben

 

 

post #7 of 29

Interesting.  I spoke with someone who said the Prophets weren't for me because of their lack of stiffness for my weight.  Considering I've got about 60 lbs on you, I'd say you're right on about your assessment. Too bad your Bonafides aren't a bit longer, I'd buy them from you if you wanted to sell.  I think 173 is too short for my size.

post #8 of 29

I bet Scott at Dawgcatching has a pair of 180 Bones he will sell you ... smile.gif

post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by allan o'neil View Post

Scott....I know you have spent time on the FX94. In those rougher snow conditions, especially with bumps covered by the same type of snow, which do you think you would prefer between the BMX98 and FX94?

Just changed my name to Scott. biggrin.gif But since I own both and am also a lighter guy...

 

MX98, no contest. The FX has its own brand of magic, but rough crud over bumps ain't part of it IMO. 
 

 

post #10 of 29


Well thanks for the response! I already own the MX98, but it's hard not to second guess your decision. Plus that sort of rough crud over bumps (steeper I would say watching the video) is exactly what I skied this past weekend. I used my DPS 112's for a bit while it was 4 inches of fresh over a thin crust and I was amazed by how well they performed in those conditions. Once it was cut up the MX98's were great...but was still curious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Just changed my name to Scott. biggrin.gif But since I own both and am also a lighter guy...

 

MX98, no contest. The FX has its own brand of magic, but rough crud over bumps ain't part of it IMO. 
 

 



 

post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 

Add ons: skied the Cham 97 from Dynastar today in crap conditions (steep off-piste re-freeze, junky frozen crud, groomers) and they were different in feel, but similar in execution.  Probably the easiest of the 3 in terms of getting in an out of the turn. Not great grip though, and shorter running length for ripping harder snow at speeds; likes quick, active feet turns.  Pin-tail gives it a unique feel.  Very quick.  Also skied the Elan 999: very confident at pretty much anything.  Not a jump-out-at-you ski, but solid in any turn shape, very good all-around ski, and after skiing a bunch of others, I went back to it, saying "wow, that ski really preformed well in a wide variety of crappy snow".  Crappy snow was the name of the game here today at the demo....

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post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benflow View Post

It's interesting you mention the stiffness of the Bonafide and your weight.  I'm 5'7" and a light (by man standards) 145lbs.  Level 7(high)/8(low) skier.  I purchased the 173 Bonafides, without demoing, this season.  I've got 8 days on them so far.  

 

I do really love the solid feel of them on groomers (flatter blues, and greens) and on icy conditions.  They rip.  They float well too for their width.  They bust crud well also. All traits a stiff ski will do.  

 

However, I'm starting to think they're not the ski for me.  I'm not a high speed groomer ripper/GS turner.  I like shorter, smaller turns, not really high speeds.  I love the trees and these things are a bear for me to manage in tight trees. Very heavy and stiff.  Compared to my 163cm Prophet 100's they feel like slow tanks that I have less control over.  Also, I was recently skiing some steep black choppy powder runs at Whistler and was trying to jump turn/lay down tight radius turns quickly and these skis just worked me over.  Very hard to manage and made me feel like I was not driving them.  I think they're just too stiff for me.  If I were an expert 8+/9 level skier at 145lbs I think they would be better... but I feel like they are currently inhibiting my progression as a skier.  While I love them out in the open and in the high speed, they're just so hard for me to manage in tight steep spots.  

 

I kind of wish I would have got the 2012 Prophet 98's.  Looks like they're my old Prophet 100's+rocker and sidewall (two things I want).  But without the Bonafide's stiffness.  Or maybe I should look into the 2012 women's model of the Bonafide with less metal?? 

 

Thoughts?

 

-Ben

 

 



 

As an add-on to this comment. I'm about 5' 10" and weighing in about 10 lbs lighter than normal these days, after a month off dealing with an injury, at ~ 135 lbs. 

 

I took my 180 bones out a few days ago on some open bowls, not very long lines, ranging from steep to moderate. There was about a foot of snow over a 5-ft solid base, and that top foot had been skied out and then hardened so that it was hard and cruddy, with  some deep troughs and tracks, though moderately penetrable. Not crust, but cold and dry and uniform throughout that top foot.

 

In any case, for the first few runs of the day I had a similar fighting feeling. Making shorter, more angulated turns, moving across the fall line more perpendicularly on the Bones in these conditions was work-- and not terribly "fun." The stiffness (and my light weight) bounced me a bit, and made me feel like I could get tossed laterally.

 

After I warmed up, though, I just bit the bullet, pointed the tips downhill, and made longer, shallower, higher speed, charging, railroad type turns... and it was as if a chorus of angels (OK, that might be the altitude on my head) started singing. Skiing like that, and the Bones were all fun and play. The crud just sort of evaporated, and the troughs felt moderated. I was making two to three times fewer turns per line. And doing it an equal amount faster-- hitting that terminal speed for the turn-type and steepness.

 

This was the second day having a similar feeling on these skis (we've had a LOT of snow in the Alps, but my last few times out I've missed the dumps so the old snow is skied out and re-frozen). On the soft, untouched blower, they'll do anything you want (same on steep groomed to first few inches of new over groomed). But on the nasty, deep-crud (not the stuff that's loose, but where its more consolidated, though not really crusty), with troughs, the Bones want to cross the fall line moving at speed and more close to downhill (tip to tail) than across hill. 

 

It's like there's an inflection point-- because the character changes. Taking it slow, turn by turn, in intermediate style on this kind of slope is fine, but taking that style and progressively skiing it more aggressively feels progressively more unstable and jerky. One has a thought in the back of the mind: "If I continue to let these open up, I'm going to kill myself." But if you just let them open up-- and I know this sounds stupid-- the whole thing mellows out (while going faster and digging deeper trenches) and becomes stable. The other funny thing was that once in this skiing regimen, it was much easier to safely shut these down and slarve off speed... as if it required moving faster to be able to shut them down faster and more safely. 

 

I guess the ultimate (obvious) point is this: They want to go over variable crud charging forward, not drifting sideways. In these conditions, for a light skier, the Bones are a best friend and forgiving to an expert and a bit evil towards an intermediate. 

post #13 of 29

Really sound like a great ski, but from what I've been reading around here, for a bigger guy the Bones are probably a bit less suitable.  I'm 200 lbs, hard charger........am looking at the Dynastar Legend 94 and Rossi Experience 98.  Bonafide was on my shortlist though, close but not quite there for my needs.

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

It's like there's an inflection point-- because the character changes. Taking it slow, turn by turn, in intermediate style on this kind of slope is fine, but taking that style and progressively skiing it more aggressively feels progressively more unstable and jerky. One has a thought in the back of the mind: "If I continue to let these open up, I'm going to kill myself." But if you just let them open up-- and I know this sounds stupid-- the whole thing mellows out (while going faster and digging deeper trenches) and becomes stable. The other funny thing was that once in this skiing regimen, it was much easier to safely shut these down and slarve off speed... as if it required moving faster to be able to shut them down faster and more safely. 

 

I guess the ultimate (obvious) point is this: They want to go over variable crud charging forward, not drifting sideways. In these conditions, for a light skier, the Bones are a best friend and forgiving to an expert and a bit evil towards an intermediate. 


Justruss' experience is similar to my experience with the Bones 187 (I"m 5'10" and about 180 lbs).  Had them in Bye Bye bowl at Sunshine a few weeks ago with variable wind effected snow.  Big arc GS style turns had no speed limit and felt smooth and controlled despite variable snow.  The skis felt powerful and confidence inspiring.  Felt the same when the snow was cut up later in the day.  Had a similar experience at Louise two weekends ago and at Apex last Wednesday and Thursday in tighter conditions.  These skis like speed.  They also like committed handling and they seem to sense my tentative or tired skiing.  I tend to get a bit lazy when I'm tired and probably get in the back seat a bit more in the late afternoon.  At these times the Bones are not as much fun.

 

In a previous post I noted that the Bones needed a centered stance - that was on groomers.  Since then I've opened the speed up some more and find that I can pressure the front nicely when at speed and in variable conditions. 

 

I still find the Bones to be not the first choice for days when the snow is a bit older and harder and I'm skiing bigger bumps all day.  The Bones do OK, but are not as fast edge to edge and the tails are a bit stiff in the bumps, so I find other skis to be more fun. 

 

Having said that, I found that detuning the last 4 to 6 inches helped for these conditions and didn't negatively affect overall handling.  I was skiing with another guy who had the 180 Bones - he had his tuned with two degree side and one degree base (I believe that the factory tune is three edge and one base) and he noted that he liked the skis much better with the less aggressive tune.  I believe that a less aggressive tune allows the skis to drift sideways more easily.

 


Edited by canadianskier - 2/8/12 at 2:35pm
post #15 of 29

I'm still amazed by people classifying the Bonafides as being stiff.  If you hand flex a bunch of 94-98mm skis in a ski shop the Bonafides are probably one of the softest in the bunch (my references would be similar skis from Dynastar, Salomon, Volkl, Rossignol).  Maybe not a soft as a K2 and I haven't hand flexed a Kastle in a while as there is only one shop in UT that has them.  The Bonafides are torsionally rather stiff though due to the metal. 

 

As far as the tune goes yes they come at .75-1* and 3* from the factory.  For my demo skis I've added a little more base bevel to the tips and tails of the ski and also detuned the first 4-6 inches on the ski.  On very hard packed conditions with the skis tipped up really far they might not pull into the top of the turn with them detuned that much but they will ski variable terrain much better which is where you're generally going to ski a 98mm ski anyways.  The tips and tails become more predictable and easier to skid/slide yet if they rest of the ski is sharp you still get performance on hard snow when you encounter it.  Just make sure that if you are adding more base bevel by hand that you really smooth out the base edge with some fine grit diamond stones.  I usually start with 400, then 600, then finish with 1000.  Whenever you create linear structure in the base edge and don't polish it out the skis can sometimes feel like they don't pivot as well. 

 


Edited by wasatchback - 2/8/12 at 9:16am
post #16 of 29

According to the 2011/2012 Kästle catalog, the BMX series has no metal and all 2011/2012 Kastle skis come from the factory with a 1 degree base/2 degree side bevel

post #17 of 29

Edited my post sorry for the confusion... was talking about the Bonafides

post #18 of 29

Wasatchback, or anyone else, would you recommend 3 degree side bevel on a 98mm or wider ski?  or is that too aggressive?

post #19 of 29

From what both Justruss and Canadian skier confirmed--the Bones absolutely rip in bowls/open terrain.  I agree on that.  However, I'm not comfortable with mass amounts of speed--probably ~25mph on broken up/tracked out powder. And 35mph on groomers.  That's not anywhere near the speed limit of the Bones.   I prefer more turns over speed.  And the Bonafides don't seem to want to slow down :)

 

Regardless of all that, as I mentioned earlier, the issue I have with the stiffness of the bones is not in the bowls or on groomers. It's in the tight trees (not glades), or on steep pitches where jump turning is almost mandatory (at least for a high 7, low 8 skier who doesn't want to bomb faces at mach 4).    It's in those two situations where I feel the skis is just too much for my 145lb weight.  


@Wasatchback ... I have hand flexed the Bonafides many times and you're right--they don't feel overly stiff.  But I would say they're significantly stiffer on the snow than my '10 Prophet 100's.  I mean, look at the construction: the Bones have two full sheets of metal and the Prophets have one cut out/partial sheet.  While that isn't super noticeable in the hands, it sure seems it to me on the snow.  But this could also be because my Prophets are 10cm shorter as well.    

 

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benflow View Post

 

Regardless of all that, as I mentioned earlier, the issue I have with the stiffness of the bones is not in the bowls or on groomers. It's in the tight trees (not glades), or on steep pitches where jump turning is almost mandatory (at least for a high 7, low 8 skier who doesn't want to bomb faces at mach 4).    It's in those two situations where I feel the skis is just too much for my 145lb weight.  

 

 


Skied the Bones all weekend in steep narrow chutes, trees, and bumps at Kicking Horse.  the snow was not very good since we haven't had much snow in over a week.  I was very happy with the 187 Bones performance in these conditions.  Although the Bones do quite well in open bowls and at speed, I also felt that the Bones stability translated nicely to tight chutes where some jump turns were sometimes needed.  Can't comment on the ski for a lighter skier - I weigh between 175 to 180.

 


Edited by canadianskier - 2/13/12 at 4:03pm
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 

Just an update: took the BMX98 to Snowbird the other day. There was about a foot of fresh, although rocks all over the place.  I didn't have any other skis on hand (not that I was desiring another ski). The 98 was money in the steeps. We did several laps up there in the Gad Chutes area (really bony, hard to avoid getting stuck due to low snow) and they were super easy in steep turns.  Found some other more filled in chutes in Peruvian Gulch, and loved the ski in there. Also got to open it up on the open bowl under Little Cloud (mostly crud, some small bumps forming) and it was money at some serious speed. Plenty of float, snappy and responsive enough to deal with the occasional firm mogul underneath.  Finally, skied a ton of big bumps (Silver Fox, another run higher up as well) and couldn't have asked for more from a 98mm ski. Tip was really soft: I was able to be really active with my feet on that ski, pulling them back and getting the tips into the trough, which is just what I need on a ski like this, especially in big bumps.  Overall, I couldn't have been happier.    

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post #22 of 29

Gunner bob,

 

I wouldn't dismiss the BMX98. I'd say you would just might want to jump up to the 188, its a fair bit stiffer than the 178 Dawg is skiing on in the review/video and plenty of ski for someone your size.  I'm 6'1" 190lbs a bit less skilled than Dawg but equally as aggressive. I found it to be on the stiffer side of what I like in that length and width, great for big mountain skiing. At my size & skill I could ski either length just depend on priorities. 

post #23 of 29

Thanks for the info Chris.  The stiffness and stability is something I cherish, but at 188 length, do you find it a bit unwieldy though?  Possibly a tradeoff, or is it still nimble enough for tighter radius turns on the groomers?

post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Really sound like a great ski, but from what I've been reading around here, for a bigger guy the Bones are probably a bit less suitable.  I'm 200 lbs, hard charger........am looking at the Dynastar Legend 94 and Rossi Experience 98.  Bonafide was on my shortlist though, close but not quite there for my needs.



I skied the E98 (video review will be up shortly) in a 180cm, and it is a pretty stiff ski.   You would likely think it rips.  Different feel than the Bone and BMX98: a bit more aggressive in the tip, not quite as surfy, a little more traditional in feel, very stable, the best in bumps of the 3, and also the best carver (I mean carver, not just cruising groomers, but really skiing it tip to tail and loading it up).  Bone is a little more nimble in crap snow and very stable; the BMX98 the most nimble of the 3, good in bumps, not quite as stable but close, and not as much fun on groomers (shorter running length, tip is out of the picture on firm snow). I found the E98 to be pretty stiff at my weight, it wasn't my favorite ski in tight spaces (bumps and trees), but Kevin, at 195lbs, loved it.  I love the E88 in 178cm; it feels around 10% softer, more manageable, and better for a skier my weight.  Skied that right afterward, and immediately was having more fun and skiing much more aggressively in trees.  

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post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Thanks for the info Chris.  The stiffness and stability is something I cherish, but at 188 length, do you find it a bit unwieldy though?  Possibly a tradeoff, or is it still nimble enough for tighter radius turns on the groomers?



Kevin says the 188cm skis short, feels similar in length to the FX104 in 184cm, maybe even a little shorter.  

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post #26 of 29

Gunnerbob

 

188's does seem pretty long but I never noticed it getting in the way, it's a quick ski almost as quick as the LX92 in 174 I was skiing back to back with it. The BMX 108 in the same length never bothered me either and my day to day big mtn ski softer and 5cm shorter. Stability wise there true to length but unwieldily never came to mind. Hope that helps.

 

Question have you considered the FX94 in 186 or demoing a Bone, BMX98 etc? Time well spent if you can.

post #27 of 29


 "The Bonafide is really stout. I found it to be too much ski for shorter turns and funky snow: tip and tail were just too stiff, and it was making me work really hard. It is most fun when I have room to let it run, and don't need to be really active on the ski with my feet.  I think this ski makes the most sense for a bigger guy; several of us smaller guys who have skied it hard got pushed around."

 

This makes me wonder how much better your experience would have been on a shorter Bonafide.  We lightweight guys don't necessarily need burly 180 cm skis in this category to get great performance. Having skied Volkl Mantras and Dynastar Legend 94s in two sizes, I have found the shorter skis inspire far more confidence.  Almost seem like a different ski.  They're easier to control in crud and moguls, and take much less muscle to get them around.  They are also turnier in shorter sizes, something I happen to love. I weigh in at 140 lbs, so I admit I'm a more extreme example, but when I demo the Bonafides I'll try 173 or 166.

 

post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post


 "The Bonafide is really stout. I found it to be too much ski for shorter turns and funky snow: tip and tail were just too stiff, and it was making me work really hard. It is most fun when I have room to let it run, and don't need to be really active on the ski with my feet.  I think this ski makes the most sense for a bigger guy; several of us smaller guys who have skied it hard got pushed around."

 

This makes me wonder how much better your experience would have been on a shorter Bonafide.  We lightweight guys don't necessarily need burly 180 cm skis in this category to get great performance. Having skied Volkl Mantras and Dynastar Legend 94s in two sizes, I have found the shorter skis inspire far more confidence.  Almost seem like a different ski.  They're easier to control in crud and moguls, and take much less muscle to get them around.  They are also turnier in shorter sizes, something I happen to love. I weigh in at 140 lbs, so I admit I'm a more extreme example, but when I demo the Bonafides I'll try 173 or 166.

 


Yeah, I probably should try a 173.  The 180 is my normal length for a ski like this, but with the tip, I might have had some luck skiing it shorter and not going over the bars. I tend to ski toward the fast side and like more ski (my Kastle BMX108's are 188cm). But yeah, it is a pretty stiff ski.  After doing 5 demo days of the 2013 product, the skis I liked were all on the softer side of things, but with some lateral stiffness.  Skis I didn't mesh with well were on the stiffer side.

 

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post #29 of 29

I'm more hard snow biased, and at my size (similar to Kevin), I'm considering the Dynastar Legend 94, Rossi E98, possibly Kastle BMX 98.  I have to admit though........I'm really lusting for the Rossi Exp 98. 

 

After I sell 2 sets of skis I have sitting at home, I think I can convince my wife that I'll need a new set next season........wink.gif

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