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What is it about tree skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 68

 

*is pleased to know that hardpack carvers and Gulliver's Travels are not both completely obsolete*

post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

^^^What's that? The Grim Reaper??



Now that you bring it up/

grimmreaper.jpg

post #33 of 68

oh, so you're responsible for the lack of snow?

post #34 of 68


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Safer than the groom, trees don't move. I prefer to rely on my skill not someone else.


My #1 reason right there.

 

-----------------------------------

 

Never hit someone on the groomers, but I've come close so many times.  People just go whatever way they want, jump off whatever they want.  In the tree's i can go where ever, no worry about smacking into someone (one time i did, just bad luck lol).  Tree's don't move, but i have hit a tree (which is why i have a helmet now).   Less people (it's very challenging), more features to have fun on, better snow (more consistent)...also i can partake in my illegal habits.  

post #35 of 68

The best snow, least tracks and the best visibility in foul weather is always in the trees, 

post #36 of 68

Been skiing over 3 decades about Tahoe resorts and early on became a powder skiing enthusiast.  A region of abundant agressive powder hounds and its a dog eat dog slope most everywhere.    One thing a wise hound learns early on is the last fresh is in forest areas or below rock outcrops.  And the last in the woods is in the deepest, darkest, tightest trees.    The beauty of an alpine timberline forest of mountain hemlock with top tips bent over in graceful curving arcs.  Absolutely every branch a work of art covered with a heavy load of white crystals.  Poke a snowy fir branch up against sun in a deep blue sky, and watch a rainbow of cold smoke floating about in the calm air.

 

Being that I am also a short turn ace and bumper, that is where you'll find me laying down sweet SSS rabbit tracks after everything else looks mucked up.  And for those carrying a pocket digital camera even on open slopes, your aesthetic SSS track will look much nicer if a frame includes a nice mix of scattered trees on a slope, adding scale and perspective.   To ski tight trees in fresh, a useful skill is being able to ski powder slower in a relaxed natural bouncy way than at the speed I see most otherwise competent powder skiers carrying. One needs to learn at an instant where one can blast through narrow gaps of small branches of pine, fir, and hemlock leaving clouds of white smoke and where one needs to not gamble and if need be pull up and climb through to the next openings.   On days with cloudy flat light, making out shapes of snow in open areas can be difficult while beside or in trees the ultraviolet is much absorbed and reduced.  Thus a mogul skiers tactic of skiing right at the edge of forested trails.

 

Trees are also dangerous places for the solo adventurer as one can get a ski or board underneath branches and worse fall into wells.  On stormy days with loud winds there are many places within big resorts where no one is likely to hear your yelling. 

 

As others have noted the quality of fresh snow in woods is usually better than out in the open.   That is because most snow falls during breezy or windy conditions and in exposed areas that causes denser flake packing.  In woods the wind is reduced so the flakes slow down falling vertically, landing gently, and thus with lots of air space between flakes.   Softest, lightest, deepest.  Finding a steep dropoff in dense trees with a bud where we stop.  Then one at a time launch down into the deep letting out a primal howl.  Taking a break in the woods is so pleasant, peaceful, and quiet.   There also one can leave a yellow snow signature of a nice round deep dark steaming hole in the sparkling white crystals without the wind shifting ye spray onto youz leg.   And as hours pass from the time of storm deposition, snow metamorphosizes.  Anything out in the sun and wind with above freezing ambients will change faster, while anything in shade and out of breezes will change slowest.


Edited by dave_SSS - 2/6/12 at 9:39pm
post #37 of 68

Where are the best trees in the northeast right now. Looking to get out wed or friday to ski and cannon has had abysmal luck with their snow rain cycles and has barely any trees open. Living on 93 south of boston and i'm complely willing to drive 3+ hours for one day of skiing (which is kind of sad)

post #38 of 68

Stowe and Sugarbush maybe one other are the only New England resorts with good trees right now...

post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bielz View Post

Where are the best trees in the northeast right now. Looking to get out wed or friday to ski and cannon has had abysmal luck with their snow rain cycles and has barely any trees open. Living on 93 south of boston and i'm complely willing to drive 3+ hours for one day of skiing (which is kind of sad)



Not Stowe! Definitely not Stowe. No matter what you do, don't come to Stowe! wink.gif

 

post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by spe777 View Post

Stowe and Sugarbush maybe one other are the only New England resorts with good trees right now...



Smuggs/ MRG as well.

post #41 of 68
Thread Starter 

Was at Sugarbush 2 days ago. def no good tree skiing,, just rocks, roots and ice.  Not taking away from the trails, because they were great.   Still hearing its all Stowe and Smuggs.      Although Sugarbush was lacking good snow in the trees , you can def tell when they get a little fresh .they got a lot of tree terrian to ski.

 

On another note... Hey Okemo!!! you said the bag jump was going to be open 10-2 mideweek????/

post #42 of 68

Skiing in the trees is about variety, it's about engaging your mind and body in a way that is unique each time and never dull.  Trees are quiet and peaceful, but demand your attention and challenge your potential.  They are protective at the same time that they are slightly dangerous.  They pit you against the stationary risks of nature . . . rather than the unpredictable flight of humans. And tomorrow, I know, as I look into the snow-filled dark skies, tomorrow the trees will be silent and filled with powder, ready to receive my swooping skis!

post #43 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl773 View Post

great pic, where is it from?


May 15th last year on Mt. Tallac near Lake Tahoe. CA.

 

Tallac day 5 powder! 025.JPG

 

JF

 

 

post #44 of 68

Sounds like we've got a "shoot-out" in the trees at Stowe coming up.....

post #45 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

Sounds like we've got a "shoot-out" in the trees at Stowe coming up.....



explain?

 

 

post #46 of 68
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
As an older guy approaching 60 (just getting started compared to many of you spit.gif ) the glades provide me with skiing variety that is more challenging than groomers, but not as punishing as continuous bump runs assuming you don't scrape any bark.  


My experience is that glades have significantly larger ruts, more irregular drops and far fewer turning options than a bump run... is this unique to Whistler or have I misinterpreted the less punishing part? 

post #47 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


My experience is that glades have significantly larger ruts, more irregular drops and far fewer turning options than a bump run... is this unique to Whistler or have I misinterpreted the less punishing part? 



Sounds like you're skiing the trees at the wrong time. Or maybe the wrong trees.

post #48 of 68
Thread Starter 

Speaking of trees  what is an ideal tree ski?  Im sure a bit short bit of flex,  flat or partial twin?  width under foot.   This year Ive been using Volkl Kendos at 177 and 88 under foot as my do all for east coast .  Bit stiff bit heavy but so far so good.  

 

Favorite tree skis?  assuming it isnt a mass pow day

post #49 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl773 View Post

Speaking of trees  what is an ideal tree ski?  Im sure a bit short bit of flex,  flat or partial twin?  width under foot.   This year Ive been using Volkl Kendos at 177 and 88 under foot as my do all for east coast .  Bit stiff bit heavy but so far so good.  

 

Favorite tree skis?  assuming it isnt a mass pow day


 

177cm  Blizzard "The one"

 

there is nothing I would change about it for all around in bounds tree skiing.

 

 

 

post #50 of 68

I like skiing the trees.

post #51 of 68
Trees are where the good snow is.
post #52 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post



explain?

 

 



See posts 29 and 30, which I forgot to quote in my earlier message. 

post #53 of 68

The trees are one place that limits (by difficulty) who can partake and play. Therefore, fewer skiers are in there. If trees were crowded, I'd be bummed; wouldn't be the same. It'd be what we call a sh&% show.

post #54 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

The trees are one place that limits (by difficulty) who can partake and play. Therefore, fewer skiers are in there. If trees were crowded, I'd be bummed; wouldn't be the same. It'd be what we call a sh&% show.



2 kids of skiers in the trees. Ones that can and ones that are just trying to survive.;-)

post #55 of 68

Tree skiing looks like fun in Nth America, the trees look pretty friendly compared to ours in Australia.

 

Trees in our Alpine resorts are pretty unforgiving if you get too close.

You could easily end up as a scarecrow on one with the some chunks off your ski parka (and some lascerations).

 

Got a few vids just POV vid of some runs.

 

My local hill at Mt Buller, had to duck for the trees overhead with chest mount on.

 

 

 

And another local haunt called Mt Hotham

 

 

 

So if anyone skis "downunda" and decides to head for the trees for some fresh cover, take care.

 

smile.gif

 

 

post #56 of 68

Have you ever seen some of Josh's (BWPA) video, now that's tree skiing, we do hit trees up in the north east US and they are unforgiving also. The snow conditions looked much more interesting in your 2nd video

post #57 of 68

IMG_0721.JPG   Here's some trees just above this:

 

IMG_0722.JPG  A little more open here.  Secret stash area at a N Idaho resort. 

 

Why trees ?  Picture worth a thousand words - notice the snow/crowd?

post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

Have you ever seen some of Josh's (BWPA) video, now that's tree skiing, we do hit trees up in the north east US and they are unforgiving also. The snow conditions looked much more interesting in your 2nd video



Untill you have to beat a few trees out of the way, it does not compare to Mount Mansfield woods skiing

 

post #59 of 68

Handy for Tree swatting.

483967-500x375.jpg

post #60 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

Have you ever seen some of Josh's (BWPA) video, now that's tree skiing, we do hit trees up in the north east US and they are unforgiving also. The snow conditions looked much more interesting in your 2nd video

 

It was a bit sparse then, last season ended with a splash (hosed out by high temp and rains early).

My home hill was done for, Hotham still had some skiable leftovers but that was about the last of it.

Those trees in 2nd vid are post a big bush fire they had some years ago and they are still a bit bare.

 

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