EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › SkiLogik: Artistry, Craftsmanship, Quality
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

SkiLogik: Artistry, Craftsmanship, Quality

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

After two years on the market, SkiLogik's handmade skis have proved to be a great success with consumers. The owners of the company, David and Mariella Mazzarella, moved their young family to Hainan Island, China, to set up a factory based on the best practices in manufacturing production and a strong ethic of "green" sustainability. It turns out that there are a lot of consumers who value David's SkiLogik both as a visionary company and for the innovative products in their lineup. 

900x600px-LL-e9ac7b5b_IMG_3383.jpeg

 

 

Or is it Mariella's exquisite top sheet designs that make anyone passing by want to stop for another look, to hold them, to examine the intricate details and mother-of-pearl accents, and feel how light and balanced they are?

 

LL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While their sustainable manufacturing ethic differentiates them from the competition, their production method is similar to the other ski companies we talked to, where they make prototypes, get athletes on them for feedback, and go back to design for adjustments. David said that generally it takes three of these iterations to achieve a satisfactory product. One of the many singular features about SkiLogik skis is regardless of length all skis of a given model are designed to make the same turn radius. Another innovation for 2013 is a unique proprietary "top edge" to protect the top sheets from damage. 

 

LL

For 2013 SkiLogik offers 18 models in 7 categories: in the Backcountry category we took a close look at the Yeti, which uses the proprietary Vector 8 carbon fiber construction -- which means the carbon fibers are arranged so that they radiate in 8 directions to give the ski torsional rigidity without adding weight. (All SkiLogik skis have some form of the Vector 8 in different combinations of carbon/fiber and /fiberglass.) 

 

LL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Spinster is their new park ski with most of the weight in the middle of the ski and Vector 8 in the tips and tails which makes it "spin." They claim it has the lowest swing weight of any ski in its class on the market. It also has their proprietary "Railroad Edge" which is a super wide bottom edge for durability.

900x600px-LL-e8b8e6f3_IMG_3385.jpeg

 

For powder there's the Powderball, a 114mm in the waist twin with a big tip rocker, progressive sidecut (more sidecut in the tip than the tail), and soft flex that "makes the day" for all levels of skiers in deep snow. Sporting way cool Norwegian cave graphics, these skis are a great choice for a second ski in a growing quiver.

 

The Ullr's Chariot RL has been redesigned for 2013 with adjusted flex.

skis-rockerlogik-ullrschariotrl_r11_c4.jpg

The 101mm waist makes it a great all-around ski for the western mountains, with a 15m turn radius. When viewed from the side, the bases are in full contact from the tails to the shovel with a rockered tip.

The flat tail enables the skier to get full engagement of the edge for confidence on hard snow while the rocketed tip gives optimal performance in soft snow. This "race ski" ride in a rockered ski is what is meant by "Rocker Logik."  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh yeah -- they make snowboards now too:

900x600px-LL-52d35a09_IMG_3571.jpeg

post #2 of 15

A SkiLogik park ski? Take skis known for their beauty, and put them somewhere known for destroying skis...great idea. That being said, I wouldn't say no to a pair.

post #3 of 15

True masterpieces!

post #4 of 15

Just like everything else in America. Lets take our idea to China where we can maximise profit and sacrifice quality.

 

Beautiful skis but lets take some more jobs away from Americans for the profit of someone who wants to get rich.

 

Sucks

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

Just like everything else in America. Lets take our idea to China where we can maximise profit and sacrifice quality.

 

Beautiful skis but lets take some more jobs away from Americans for the profit of someone who wants to get rich.

 

Sucks



Seriously Lars? Do you think Dave is getting rich making skis? Sure he could have made them here but the costs would be prohibitive. When you sell your Miata (made in Japan but designed by an America, Bob May) and buy a Solstice (built in the good ole US of A, Delaware) stop throwing rocks in your glass house. If you want to get on a soap box, you have another place to do it. 

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

Just like everything else in America. Lets take our idea to China where we can maximise profit and sacrifice quality.

 

Beautiful skis but lets take some more jobs away from Americans for the profit of someone who wants to get rich.

 

Sucks



You are on K2's in your profile pic. Who are you to talk?

 

At least he took it another step further, and moved his whole family.

post #7 of 15

http://powdermagazin.de/#/6

On the Powderball skis, they have used the logo of the Rabbit On The Roof skis (from Chamonix).

On their website they claim they can produce every ski imaginable. I wonder if I can order a pair of Rossignols and a pair of Dynastars?

What they do in summer? Made in China Louis Vuitton bags?

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeanC View Post

http://powdermagazin.de/#/6

On the Powderball skis, they have used the logo of the Rabbit On The Roof skis (from Chamonix).

On their website they claim they can produce every ski imaginable. I wonder if I can order a pair of Rossignols and a pair of Dynastars?

What they do in summer? Made in China Louis Vuitton bags?


Both of your posts on this forums have been carbon copies, and pretty much stalking a ski brand that you are clueless about. Clearly you are a moron.

 

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post



Seriously Lars? Do you think Dave is getting rich making skis? Sure he could have made them here but the costs would be prohibitive. When you sell your Miata (made in Japan but designed by an America, Bob May) and buy a Solstice (built in the good ole US of A, Delaware) stop throwing rocks in your glass house. If you want to get on a soap box, you have another place to do it. 



Phil,

 

You are absolutely right but don't go far enough.  You and I know most edges on skis are manufactured overseas, as is titinal, UHMW bases, epoxies, synthetic cores (on many skis), etc.  The idea of a "domestic" ski is silly at a time when K2 may be more foreign than Rossignol.  Manufacturing in places other than the USA keeps inflation down and should have no long-term impact on the economy as domestic workers shift to other forms of manufacturing or services.  The last I heard, we export a lot of services from the USA.    If Ski Logik, domiciled in Colorado, didn't manufacture in China I'd likely be paying more than double the cost per pair of skis.  If Ski Logik had to sell $2,000 skis, I doubt the company would hire as many USA employees as they now have!  As others have pointed out, the Ski Logik quality is as good as it gets because the owners personally trained a select group of loyal employees, and oversee the daily construction process.

 

All too often there are those posting with a personal agenda (fired employee, work for a competitor, don't like ____________ people, etc.) who attack honest people and businesses.  For example, the recent Deer Valley post and this one is getting ridiculously untrue comments from people who are simply hateful for some unknown reason.  I am against censorship, but am certainly in favor of civility.  I am also pround to be an early adaptor to the Ski Logik brand.

 

post #10 of 15

<shrug>  start a tree farm, export slow-growth and veneer lumber to China?

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

<shrug>  start a tree farm, export slow-growth and veneer lumber to China?



Pulp and paperboard is already on the list:

 

 

Table 2: Top US Exports to China, 2010 ($ billion)
*Calculated by USCBC
Source: ITC
HS# Commodity description Volume % change over 2009
85 Electrical machinery and equipment 11.5 21.9
84 Power generation equipment 11.2 33.6
12 Oil seeds and oleaginous fruits 11.0 18.1
88 Aircraft and spacecraft 5.8 8.0
90 Optics and medical equipment 5.2 31.2
39 Plastics and articles thereof 4.8 10.5
87 Vehicles, excluding rail 4.5 134.4
28, 29 Inorganic and organic chemicals 4.5* 34.2*
47 Pulp and paperboard 3.0 22.0
74 Copper and articles thereof 2.9 62.0


 

 

post #12 of 15

If they didn't have a ridiculous top sheet they wouldn't cost $2000

 

the rest is absurd
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post



Phil,

 

You are absolutely right but don't go far enough.  You and I know most edges on skis are manufactured overseas, as is titinal, UHMW bases, epoxies, synthetic cores (on many skis), etc.  The idea of a "domestic" ski is silly at a time when K2 may be more foreign than Rossignol.  Manufacturing in places other than the USA keeps inflation down and should have no long-term impact on the economy as domestic workers shift to other forms of manufacturing or services.  The last I heard, we export a lot of services from the USA.    If Ski Logik, domiciled in Colorado, didn't manufacture in China I'd likely be paying more than double the cost per pair of skis.  If Ski Logik had to sell $2,000 skis, I doubt the company would hire as many USA employees as they now have!  As others have pointed out, the Ski Logik quality is as good as it gets because the owners personally trained a select group of loyal employees, and oversee the daily construction process.

 

All too often there are those posting with a personal agenda (fired employee, work for a competitor, don't like ____________ people, etc.) who attack honest people and businesses.  For example, the recent Deer Valley post and this one is getting ridiculously untrue comments from people who are simply hateful for some unknown reason.  I am against censorship, but am certainly in favor of civility.  I am also pround to be an early adaptor to the Ski Logik brand.

 



 

post #13 of 15


I still think Osage Orange and red elm could be awesome ski core woods. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post



Pulp and paperboard is already on the list:

 

 

Table 2: Top US Exports to China, 2010 ($ billion)
*Calculated by USCBC
Source: ITC
HS# Commodity description Volume % change over 2009
85 Electrical machinery and equipment 11.5 21.9
84 Power generation equipment 11.2 33.6
12 Oil seeds and oleaginous fruits 11.0 18.1
88 Aircraft and spacecraft 5.8 8.0
90 Optics and medical equipment 5.2 31.2
39 Plastics and articles thereof 4.8 10.5
87 Vehicles, excluding rail 4.5 134.4
28, 29 Inorganic and organic chemicals 4.5* 34.2*
47 Pulp and paperboard 3.0 22.0
74 Copper and articles thereof 2.9 62.0


 

 



 

post #14 of 15

Check out the limited edition MRA top sheet. Pretty slick, EH?

 

MRA SKI Final.jpg

post #15 of 15

They're all such beautiful works of art. I wish there were more reviews of people riding them. Read a few nice reviews, but would love to read more. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › SkiLogik: Artistry, Craftsmanship, Quality