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ski widths whats best for the east

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Whats the ideal one quiver ski width, for the east.  Hard pack ice, glades, groomers, crud, ect...

post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by claydog View Post

Whats the ideal one quiver ski width, for the east.  Hard pack ice, glades, groomers, crud, ect...


first there is no ideal one ski quiver

 

depends on the person and the terrain. The east has everything from 300 foot mountian that get 50 inches of snow a year, to 2000 vertical foot mountains that get more snow than a vail in year.

 

what resort?

 

For my resort Stowe if I had choose one ski it would be 180cm 100 mm with camber underfoot rockered tips and tails, twin tipped. It would also have touring binding to help me escape the masses.  Then again in the last 7 days 6 have had a some sort of fresh snow to enjoy and the one that did not was rainy slushly day.

 

but thats just me, I can ski untracked snow all day long assuming it has snowed any bit recently, but I WORK alot for it somedays like today after work  Alot of people at my resort would think I am crazy for picking such big ski but I think they are crazy for skiing so much hardpack.

post #3 of 21

68 to 69 mm, but you still need 4 skis: SL, GS, SG and a GSish deep snow ski.  If you can only afford one, then get a cheater GS.

post #4 of 21

For my resort Stowe, it would be 88mm, traditional camber. So I guess there really is no ideal one-ski quiver.

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

maybe i am over thinking this if you can ski you can ski.  It seems to me that super faty skis are a west thing and just a fade in the east.  Its great to have 105 under foot 12" of fresh pow but you have two other pair of skis in the closet.  My gut says rossi 88 experience or the kendo also 88 for a good all condition ski and keep my B5's for the ice and when all the glades are skied up at saddleback and sunday river or abram.

Demo days this year where a bust in maine so i am going to wait for 1213 and prey to the gods for early snow.  any comments are welcome.

post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by claydog View Post

maybe i am over thinking this if you can ski you can ski.  It seems to me that super faty skis are a west thing and just a fade in the east.  Its great to have 105 under foot 12" of fresh pow but you have two other pair of skis in the closet.  My gut says rossi 88 experience or the kendo also 88 for a good all condition ski and keep my B5's for the ice and when all the glades are skied up at saddleback and sunday river or abram.

Demo days this year where a bust in maine so i am going to wait for 1213 and prey to the gods for early snow.  any comments are welcome.



whats a super fat ski?

post #7 of 21

I just spent a few days in the Adirondack's and got in 4 days on my Rossignols S6 had firm conditions and they performed very well.  They

 

 

are 110 under foot lf_gorE5592.JPG

 

Keep in my I am not claiming to be an expert.... so be kind on the critique of posture ... etc. 

 

post #8 of 21

I wouldn't go much bigger than 88-90 underfoo for an eastern all mountain ski.  My personal preference is 80 underfoot with my much loved and now discontinued AC30's.  Most skis in this category are in the 85-90 width and are now coming with some form of rocker or early rise.  They are also skiing a little longer, so keep that in mind when choosing a length.  The Rossi Exp 88, Avenger 82, Volkl RTM 84, Kendo, Nordica Fire Arrow 80, Blizzard Mag 8.1 or 8.7  would all be good choices depending on what you are looking for in a ski.

 

Good luck,

 

Rick G

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post



whats a super fat ski?



to me a really fat east coast ski is anything over 100 under foot. Bear in mind I only want to bring one ski to the mountain, and not a golf bag full for different terrain,  With two kids and my wife we carry enough in from the car as is.

 

post #10 of 21

I use 87's

post #11 of 21

That all depends on how you are balanced in you ski boots. Bowlegged skiers tend to do better in narrower waisted skies while knockkneed skiers in wider waisted skis.

 

See a good bootfitter for a stance check to see at www.bootfitters.com

 

Jeffrey Rich C. Ped.

www.usorthoticcenter.com

post #12 of 21

If you ski anywhere where there are bumps or trees and occasional soft snow, you'll want something 85-98mm in the waist, 175-182cm in length.  Definitely with camber; tip and tail rocker are optional.  Don' go too soft either.  

 

The Experience 88 is a good ski (though the SC86 that it replaced is a better one!) but, it isn't the best all-arounder.

 

One Ski?  I'd get something like the Dynastar Legend 94, Atomic Savage ti, Elan Apex, maybe that new Head Peak 84.  I hear the Bushwacker is very versatile  (never skied it though).  If I were getting one ski from the Rossi Experience line it would be the 98 (which rips, has metal so it holds better on the firm than the 88) is a true crud buster with more than adequate float.

 

A Cheater GS as your only ski???  Not for me, nor for most (even good skiers who ski small mountains!).  Great ski to have in a quiver, however.

 

Good luck.   Don't think too hard about this---most skis these days ski really well and at similar waist widths and lengths, most skis ski pretty similarly.  Find a deal, and go with whatever ski has the best graphics.

post #13 of 21

For a one ski eastern quiver, I see you have two basic choices:  (1) a narrower versatile carver or (2) a wider all-mountain ski with good hard snow grip.  With the first you will have more fun on the groomed trails but struggle a bit if there's much fresh snow.  With the second you will have a ball on powder days but have to settle a bit if there hasn't been fresh snow in awhile (or a rain-freeze cycle like we've had repeatedly this year).   Personal choice.  Either will work. 

post #14 of 21

I ski the east- NH and main primarily, 45-60 days per season. The last few season I have had no issue with a legend 80 or the legend 85. Both are good versatile 'all mountain east skis' That handle evry type of condition weel, softer snow better. I also have a pair of progressor 8+'s for hard pack and bump days. Excellent ski that handels everything real well except deep powder and really high speeds. they have a 74mm waist. I just a pair of Dynastar speed courses because it has been so Icy here and they have a 71mm waist and they really carve up well on the hard pack. I find the 74-80mm waist is the most versatile, but with the firm conditions this year I honestly have been riding my fishers and dynastars exclusively. The instructors at cannon mostly ski on 71mm-84mm waists so I think in the end you need to fugure out where you spend most of your time and the type of skiing you usually do and demo from there same at the loaf.. There are many skis that have over 80mm waists that are in the carving category now, but for me, I feel like an ideal true carver is in the 70-75mm waist range. Good luck. where do you do most of your skiing? I always ask the instructors what they prefer since they are out there day after day. They usually provide great insight.

post #15 of 21

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimH View Post

For a one ski eastern quiver, I see you have two basic choices:  (1) a narrower versatile carver or (2) a wider all-mountain ski with good hard snow grip.  With the first you will have more fun on the groomed trails but struggle a bit if there's much fresh snow.  With the second you will have a ball on powder days but have to settle a bit if there hasn't been fresh snow in awhile (or a rain-freeze cycle like we've had repeatedly this year).   Personal choice.  Either will work. 


I think it depends a lot on your ability and number of ski days also.  In the East, even if you are an upper-intermediate/advanced/low expert skier skiing under 30 days a year, you will probably ski 90% on piste -- aided by policies at many areas that the woods are out of bounds.  On piste = mostly groomed or heavily skied-on in the East.  We don't tend to get big dumps, so a "powder" day will be 6-8" at most, which at best then turns to chop and then packed down stuff.  "Flotation" just doesn't play into things for most of us, so there's a limit to what you might want to give up to go wide. JimH suggests you might "struggle a bit if there's much fresh snow".  I'd suggest that's not really that much of an issue for most recreational skiers.  Any fresh snow we get will be groomed or packed within hours. 
I would suggest something 70-80 underfoot.  What you gain in quickness and carvability will more than offset any perceived loss of "float".

 

....I know some folks on this board will dispute this, saying they ski powder or fresh all the time in the East.  But if you really do.....you already know who you are and what you need/want.

 


 

 

post #16 of 21

This might help...  I just came back from a 3 day trip to MRG on my new Line P90s:

 

http://www.epicski.com/products/2012-line-prophet-90-ski/reviews

 

The conditions were a good test for an all mountain ski.  At 90 under foot they were awesome on the hardpack/ice.

post #17 of 21

The Op has not come back, really untill he tells us more all of this is just banter.

post #18 of 21

I just came back for a 7 day ski  run up NH to Sunday River and back down NH.   Skied the Blizzard 81 and 87's going up NH at Ragged, Gunstock and Attitash.  Then was dying to try out my new Bushwhackers (88 waist) at Sunday River.  First day at Sunday I skied the 87's and the next two days were on the Whackers.   They proved to be way better then all the reviews I had read.  Handled everything at Sunday (although no glades) without any complaints.  Handled frozen granular chop without notice and turn initiation is thoughtless.  Craved  White Heat as good as the 87's and also noticeably less leg fatigue than the 87'safter six hours or skiing.  Skied the Whackers at Cannon on 4 inches of rain soaked snow over boiler plate without an problems also.  I was so impressed with the Whackers that I just bought a pairs of Bonifide's (98 waist). 

post #19 of 21

Recently bought a pair of the new Dynastar Outland 80 XT in 178 length. 126/80/110 with rockered tip & tail & traditional camber in the middle. I ski mostly central to northern VT & have been very happy with the ski so far. My old ski were Dynastar 8000 legends & I'd say these new ski's are better.

post #20 of 21

Agree with the below.  When most people say East they're not talking Jay/Sugarbush/MRG/Stowe.  Those are the exception and not always.  East usually means hardpack and bumps.  Woods seldom have more than 6" of fresh.  3D snow is not an issue most of the time.  Edge grip is almost always an issue.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil J View Post

I ski the east- NH and main primarily, 45-60 days per season. The last few season I have had no issue with a legend 80 or the legend 85. Both are good versatile 'all mountain east skis' That handle evry type of condition weel, softer snow better. I also have a pair of progressor 8+'s for hard pack and bump days. Excellent ski that handels everything real well except deep powder and really high speeds. they have a 74mm waist. I just a pair of Dynastar speed courses because it has been so Icy here and they have a 71mm waist and they really carve up well on the hard pack. I find the 74-80mm waist is the most versatile, but with the firm conditions this year I honestly have been riding my fishers and dynastars exclusively. The instructors at cannon mostly ski on 71mm-84mm waists so I think in the end you need to fugure out where you spend most of your time and the type of skiing you usually do and demo from there same at the loaf.. There are many skis that have over 80mm waists that are in the carving category now, but for me, I feel like an ideal true carver is in the 70-75mm waist range. Good luck. where do you do most of your skiing? I always ask the instructors what they prefer since they are out there day after day. They usually provide great insight.



 

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldsbar View Post

Agree with the below.  When most people say East they're not talking Jay/Sugarbush/MRG/Stowe.

 

The Northeast has other ski resorts?  smile.gif

 

Actually Whiteface would be a good example on the other extreme most of the time.
 

 

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