EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Cold Feet (not the usual situation, very unique can't figure out a solution, doctor ?)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cold Feet (not the usual situation, very unique can't figure out a solution, doctor ?)

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Ok, don't tell me to search other posts..been there done that no help.

 

My feet are always cold. I know why it's because they sweat. I do EVERYTHING I can think of. My boots are perfect, custom fitted with foot beds so I wear thin ski socks. I don't put them on until I get to the lodge. I even put anti perspirant on my feet before putting the socks on.. Nothing works..at the end of a ski day My boots are soaked (it's not pretty).. Even when it's negative something they still sweat. That's when it's bad because the sweat then freezes and I'm screwed. Should I see a doctor ? they don't sweat on the average day, they sweat at the gym a-lot etc. 

 

I'm at a loss... botox injections ??  

 

I don't even notice it when I ski, but If I stop for lunch and then come back out that's when it starts..yes I know..change socks at lunch, but that doesn't help the liner is soaked..

post #2 of 7

Have you thought of using baby powder? Turn your sock inside out, put your hand in the sock and make a cup at the toe end, sprinkle several squirts of baby powder into the cupped end. Then turn the sock right side in, insert your foot and raise it into the air and shake your foot around. This spreads the powder on top and on the bottom of your foot. Put on ski boot as usual. The powder should help to keep your foot dry of sweat. Otherwise visit your doctor for the drug/cure they use for wet underarms. It may be a drug or an injection.

post #3 of 7

There are prescription-strength antiperspirants along with oral medications and other options.  

http://www.mayoclinic.org/hyperhidrosis/

 

 

Some people advocate soaking in tea:

http://www.superfoodsrx.com/nutrition/ask-the-doctor/cure-sweaty-feet.html

post #4 of 7

There are a bunch of folks out there that are fans of using some sort of vapor barrier. If you search the TGR forums, you'll find a lot of posts about it (not joking about looking on TGR this time). It comes up more around hands than feet, but both have been discussed. I think the idea is to lock the moisture into the sock so it doesn't soak the liner and therefore the liner maintains it's ability to insulate. You'd probably end up wanting to change the vapor barrier sock at lunchtime just to get rid of the moisture, but if it works, that'd be worth it.

 

These look kind of cool: http://www.rbhdesigns.com/product/2043/vaprthrm-and-hi-and-rise-insulated-sock.htm

 

If you try them, report back on how they work for you. I've thought of doing something like that on touring days where I can't dry out my liners overnight. Intuition liners are extra warm, but they soak up a lot of sweat (my feet sweat a lot too). When I was a kid I remember putting plastic baggies over our feet on cold days. This was back before good plastic boots with good liners.


Edited by Sinecure - 2/1/12 at 8:18pm
post #5 of 7

This might sound weird, but it's worth a try: Wear a thin plastic bag over your bare foot and under your sock. That keeps both your sock and your boot liner dry and maintains their insulating power. Your feet will be damp, but warm. I did this for XC skiing years ago and it worked surprisingly well. You could change to a fresh baggie partway through the day, I guess, but I never had to.

post #6 of 7

 The vapor barrier has been around a long time and was used during WWII by US troops.  Here's a link http://www.ssrsi.org/Onsite/vapor_barriers.htm

 

And what that website says about socks:

 

"Socks are where most people first experience vapor barriers in use. Most everyone remembers their mothers wrapping their feet in bread bags before they put on their boots to go out in the snow. That is almost all there is to it! Remember to put on a thin pair of synthetic liner socks, then the bread bag and then a pair of thicker socks (like rag wool)."

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

 The vapor barrier has been around a long time and was used during WWII by US troops.  Here's a link http://www.ssrsi.org/Onsite/vapor_barriers.htm

 

And what that website says about socks:

 

"Socks are where most people first experience vapor barriers in use. Most everyone remembers their mothers wrapping their feet in bread bags before they put on their boots to go out in the snow. That is almost all there is to it! Remember to put on a thin pair of synthetic liner socks, then the bread bag and then a pair of thicker socks (like rag wool)."

I never used a liner sock inside the baggie. I preferred the thin plastic forming a second skin rather than a wet fabric sock sliding around and maybe causing chafing or blisters. (This was XC skiing. Alpine boots, if they fit right, should eliminate sliding around inside the boot.)
 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Cold Feet (not the usual situation, very unique can't figure out a solution, doctor ?)