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More Respect for Dynafit Bindings

Poll Results: What BC bindings do you ski?

 
  • 68% (11)
    Dynafit
  • 6% (1)
    Marker
  • 12% (2)
    Fritschi
  • 0% (0)
    Silveretta
  • 12% (2)
    Telemark
  • 0% (0)
    Alpine Trekkers
  • 0% (0)
    La Sportiva
  • 0% (0)
    Boot Hiker
16 Total Votes  
post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I was taking an avy 1 course up at Mt Rose in Tahoe last week. I NEVER ski my FT12 Dynafit inbounds... I tend to get my 200+lb body moving a little faster than I like in the dynafits just cause well it's often groomed and wide open (STH16 cranked feel safer!). In any case... I was going to make a hi-speed slashing turn up a little convexed roller and managed to pull the Dynafit toe piece out of the ski at 40mph or so. The binding was still on my boot and the ski was skidding to a stop with the heal break dragging. 

 

So! I now feel way safer in the binding. I would never ski like that in the backcountry and don't feel like I am going to step out easily.

 

My thought on why the binder pulled out? The FT12 has a very narrow screw placement, even though there are 5 screws. My ski has 100+ wide center area where the binding was mounted. The G's from a turn like that need to have a way wider screw placement in any ski. 

 

Anyhow... for me it was a revelation in the bomberness of the Dynafit. It was hard to transition to it for the first few days out... "How do those little pins on the side of my toe hold me in?" Now I know... If you ski BC a lot, Dynafit or bust!

 

post #2 of 13

So...you're convinced of the "bomberness" of the Dyna-fits....except when they're pulling out of the ski? Or, you're just going to ensure you NEVER ski at 40+ in the B.C.?

 

I've never used Dyna-fits and, from what I've read, they're pretty great at what they do...but your post doesn't appear to be a ringing endorsement.

 

-Smarty

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Haha... ya not 40+ in the BC. The bindings are bomber, just keep the speeds down until the make a wider screw platform for your fat BC skis.

edit: I see that the FT12 Radical have a wider mounting base. I'll have to upgrade.
post #4 of 13

NIce poll, only I ski Dynafits (3 models), Marker, and Fritschi for Alpine, and Voile Switchbacks, 3-pin cables, and 3 pins for telemark.

 

My primary bindings are Dynafits:  Vertical STs on my Manaslus for soft snow, Comforts on 7 summits for firm snow (also vertical sts on my Snowwolfs for firm snow), and Speed Radicals on my Karhu Guides for bc ski patrol.

 

I skied 120 days in the backcountry last year with no problems with the bindings (I weigh 230 lbs).

post #5 of 13

You just need a pair of Sollyfit plates. You'll get a wider, pull-out proof mount for your dynafiddles, plus the ability to easily swap to the Salomon binders when you want the full-on alpine experience.

 

I voted for Dynafit although I also use Marker (Tour) and my "Dynafit" bindings are actually Plums, but it's the same idea - more or less.

post #6 of 13

Flawed poll.  I use tele and Dynafit depending on my mood and what I'm doing.  

 

Binding pull-out is pretty much always caused by faulty mounting, user error, or bad ski cores.  Not always, but pretty much always.  

post #7 of 13

For those who do like Dynafits (which includes me; they are my primary bindings on many different pairs of skis), you might check out Plum Guides, which are a knockoff of the Dynafit FT model but all metal and a bit lighter (primarily because they have leashes instead of brakes). Many folks don't like using leashes in avy terrain, but they are required anyway in must-not-fall terrain.  I have ~60 days in on a pair of Plums and have found them be very good (though I have heard that the heel pins have been breaking on a recent lot).

post #8 of 13

raspritz, I think the pins have been breaking on some of this year's Plums b/c the top plate on the heel is coming loose. There's a lot of discussion of this on TGR. I've had no problems with my Plums from last season.

post #9 of 13

Just got back from a 5 day hut trip and blew the top plactic piece that holds the televate on theDynafit Radical. I had about 10 days of hiking these prior to going into this trip and my trip was 5 days and they broke on the 4th day. They lasted exactly two weeks. I have owned everything at this point that I believe is worth hiking in, but have not broke anything except a Dynafit. I really liked them to this point and feel that the boot is the flawed piece, but reliability is a big question now. To the bindings credit, I was on very steep and icy terrain where I was having to stomp to set my skin through the ice...probably as abusive as most will get while hiking. I still dont think they should have broke and I have done similar things in the past on all the other types of binders and they have not failed.

I hope they will be good and quick with warranty and this was just dumb luck.

post #10 of 13

Backcountry bindings have tradeoffs: light weight requires no abuse, heavy weight requires more calories expended and more muscle.  I have Speed radicals. They are great; I would never stomp on either of the two lifters--they are lightweight, and fragile.  I wouldn't stomp on they volcano on my Vertical STs.  I really don't stomp on my heel pieces (they are all plastic); I do use crampons (Dynafits have a nice groove for that).  I even be reluctant to stomp very hard on my Freeride Plus bindings (they are plastic too). Maybe you can stomp on Marker Dukes; if so that would be a good binding for you.  

post #11 of 13

Sorry for the delayed reply. No shit Andy! I think I said I was being abusive. Not sure what sort of BC skiing people do but I, on occasion, find myself in terrain that is less than desireable and unplanned, sometimes. In some of these situations I may need to do less than appropriate things to my equipment to get myself into a safer situation......skinning up an iceeee slope in this specific instance. Down was not an option and I would have given anything for a set of crampons. I own crampons but I am generally a powder skier and try not to do things which require them. Atleast once a season I find myself in these situations. I have owned all of the major hiking bindings at this point and have put them all in this type of abusive situation, stomping through ice to get a bit of traction ( I believe some call it  "setting the skin"), a dynafit is the only binding that has failed me. I do agree with all things Andy said just not the picture I believe s/he was trying to paint. I like the Dynafits and think they tour very well, but they, mostly the boots, have a ways to go to compete with a more downhill oriented market. I do think they are trying to get into this market.

post #12 of 13

Wasn't trying to paint a picture.  I do/have done mostly skiing on the Volcanos of the PNW, sometimes in the Cascade Mountains, sometimes in the British Columbia ranges.  Did about 120 days of that last year.  Yes, I have found myself in some sketchy situations--unanticipated bullet-proof ice, too steep to take a ski off to put a crampon on.  These instances made me pretty conservative--always carrying ski crampons and putting them on sometimes when it proved unnecessary; booting up where one could kick thru or into the icy crust; and, when I did a lot of skiing in less than desirable conditions (in other words, when I was full-time employed), I carried BD Sabertooth crampons for my ski boots.  If I'm going up high, I always carry two poles with self-arrest grips (my current ones are BD Whippets) that can also help when booting up steep slopes.  When it gets sketchy and I'm without crampons on my skis and can't put them on, the best technique I know is to slide my ski forward, with the base nearly horizontal, pressing the edge into the ice/crust without lifting the ski up or lettings it lay at an angle--it is slow, tiring, and still hairy, but it usually works.  In less sketchy conditions, there have been many times I took a ski off, and kicked thru the crust to get a foothold to take the other ski off and boot up (or take the skins off and head down).  I know some who have broken heel pieces and, fortunately, were able to still ski out.  I try to be gentle on the bindings. 

 

BTW, B&D ski leashes (like telephone cord; bndskigear.com) are really good for removing skis on steep slopes to put on crampons or take off skins (or to boot).  Release the binding and grab the leash and you and pull the ski up to vertical to do what you want with it, without uncoupling the leash or reaching all the way down to grab your ski.


Edited by Andy Carey - 2/28/12 at 4:54pm
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Carey View Post

Backcountry bindings have tradeoffs: light weight requires no abuse, heavy weight requires more calories expended and more muscle.  I have Speed radicals. They are great; I would never stomp on either of the two lifters--they are lightweight, and fragile.  I wouldn't stomp on they volcano on my Vertical STs.  I really don't stomp on my heel pieces (they are all plastic); I do use crampons (Dynafits have a nice groove for that).  I even be reluctant to stomp very hard on my Freeride Plus bindings (they are plastic too). Maybe you can stomp on Marker Dukes; if so that would be a good binding for you.  



Stomp the Dukes for sure. They are a big ole setup. Great post with the safety on the gnar. If you are in that situation with undesirable terrain, I'd trust my crampons and rope in more than any binders.

From my experience, the Dynafits hold you in really well in all sorts of conditions. If you are afraid of them coming off your boot, lock em. I will more than likely break the binding than my leg from experience i have had with 16-20 green springs.

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