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Goggle problem with contact lens

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I am fairly new and only started skiing last year. I wear contact lens and am using the Smith Stance goggle. I was happy that the goggle worked well in various lighting conditions and fits my face and helmet well.

 

However this year, as I get a little better skiing and going a little faster, the air flow in the google started to bother me. It makes my contact lens dry so that when I blink, it shifts the lens around and I can't see very well. I am only going maybe 20-25 mph, which most of the people here probably won't even consider fast at all. I have tried openinig/closing the vent on the goggle, but it does not make a difference. Lask week, my contact lens fell out in the middle of the slope. I had to ski half "blind" for the rest of the way down the mountain. Luckily, my contact lens was still in the goggle and I was able to clean it and put it back in.

 

So my question is

  1. Is anybody else having a similar problem?

  2. Is this an issue with this particular model?

  3. What can I do to fix it? If the answer is to buy a different goggle, then which one?

 

Any info will be appreciated.

 

 

post #2 of 22

I have a similar problem, clinically dry eyes + contacts is never fun, even when I'm not skiing.  If I have to stop halfway down a run because I have to blink ferociously to prevent a contact from falling out, a few lubricating eye drops usually helps.  I use carrera goggles (don't remember the model), and I typically keep the vents closed, although I'm not sure if it really makes a significant difference.  

 

Anyway, for me, the bottom line is I have dry eyes and it's something I've lived with most of my life.  Bring some drops to the mountain, it should help.  

post #3 of 22

 

Your goggles don't  fit right.     

 

Find ones that create dead air space around your orbits and seal against your face better.

 

If closing the vent doesn't change anything, you've probably got an air gap somewhere else between your face and the goggle, like at the nose, at the cheek, or at the goggle strap attachment points.

post #4 of 22

+1 on the drops...reapply on the lift as needed (for me seems to be every lift ride up)

 

post #5 of 22

Just curious, I've had contacts for 44 years and the ONLY ones I ever had fall out were hard contacts...which I am not even sure they make anymore...  Are yours standard soft lenses??

 

Are you wearing a helmet?  

 

Frankly, I'd take the issue to your opthamologist.  They might suggest a different brand or check your fit or something.  I just don't have anywhere near that much airflow in my goggles to cause such a problem.  

post #6 of 22

+1 on the eye drops. An essential piece of gear for me.

 

Like sibhusky I rarely lose or dislodge any lens except the hard ones, which I wore from the mid-1970s into the 1990s. Soft lenses since then and they pretty much stay put. I did lose one skiing once and I'm myopic. Without correction I can't see more than 3 feet from my nose... it's no fun skiing that way!

 

Since then I've worn disposable lenses for skiing, the wear-once-and-throw-away sort. This has worked well because:

  1. They're cheap. 
  2. They're very thin and flexible, so they're very hard to dislodge... I've never had it happen while skiing
  3. I carry a spare pair in a pocket. Takes up no room, costs next to nothing, keeps me seeing and skiing.

I do have to carry a pair of reading glasses to see up close but they're cheap too.

 

 

post #7 of 22

As others said, first make sure the goggles are fitting you right, so there aren't like gaps which is causing the excess air flow.


Then if stilll too much air is flowing, and you want to futz with it rather then trying a different set of goggles., you can consider taping over some of the foam to reduce the flow.  

post #8 of 22

I'm an ophthalmologist, so I'll let everyone else focus on the goggles and I'll focus on the contact lens (though an optometrist would be even better here)...

 

The contact lens may not be fitting you correctly, either. If you look on the package, what is the base curve of the lens? (It should be a number between 8 and 9, eg 8.7) If the lens is too steep or flat, it may not fit well on your eye and may be more prone to popping out.

post #9 of 22
Used to have the same problem. Only thing I found to fix was

LASIK!!!!
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knwilson View Post

Used to have the same problem. Only thing I found to fix was
LASIK!!!!


Just got lasik 1week ago.  Super excited to finally go skiing without contacts or glasses/otg this weekend!  I expect dry eyes from the procedure, but have my stash of eye drops ready to go. yahoo.gif  

 

post #11 of 22

Look at goggles designed for racing. These are the goggles that I personally can't stand. Because they have very little front-facing vents. I run hot and I look for goggles with maximum ventilation. I'll put up with a little wind on my contacts at 40+mph to avoid fogging at low speeds or on wet days. POC, Shred and Briko all make race goggles that have no vents in the lenses.

post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the input. Good thing that I am not the only one having this problem. But given how many people wears contacts these days, I am guessing that most of the people do not have have this issue. Would be helpful to hear what goggle is being used from the ones not haveing this issue.

 

As far as general eye dryness, I am fine except when I am skiing. Did not have to use eye drops for all the years I have been wearing contacts. Even though it does not fix the root cause of the problem, looks like drops will help. I will definitely give that a try.

 

Regarding the comment that the goggle does not fit well, I checked the seal of the foam against my face, and it was good with no gaps or spaces in between. I don't know if anyone notice, there are openings all around the frame of the goggle that is covered by coarse foam to allow for air flow. I have checked a few different goggles from my friends, and they all have this. The size and shape may be different but the design is similar. I did try taping off about half of these openings, and it did not help. Maybe I will try taping off all of it as someone suggested to see what happens. The concern here is that if all air flow is blocked, the goggle will probably fog up.

 

As to the type of contact lens I wear, it is soft lens. But due to the strong myopia and astigmatism I have, they are much thicker than normal, especially on the bottom part. They also cost a lot more, and having weekly disposables is not an option. The best I can get is 4 pairs for a year costing a few hundred $. Nevertheless, bring a pair as backup is a good idea until I get this problem solved.

 

I understand the concept of lens curvature. Two years ago when my eye doctor check me out, I was told the fit was great, and I continued to use the same brand/perscription lens which I had been using for 3+ years prior. So I am not convinced that the curvature is the problem. The other things is the air flow/dryness problem affects one of my eyes a lot more than the other, which also leads me to think this particular pair of goggle may be faulty. 

 

I think I will at least try a different brand/model of goggle to see if it makes any difference. Thanks for the suggestion of racing goggles. I will do some research and decide what to get.

 

post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

Dup post removed

post #14 of 22

If you tape up the foam, and that causes the goggles are fogging, that means you have plenty of moisture in the airspace, so that means your contacts aren't drying out due to excessive dry air.    So you should be able to find a happy medium, or at least use that as an experiment.

 

Maybe you're just so excited about skiing that you are forgetting to blink!  Or need more omega3 or flaxseed in your diet to promote more tear production.

post #15 of 22

The way goggles keep from fogging is by having vents that bring in a good bit of air from the sides.

 

If the vents are set up such that they blow air across your eyeballs horizontally, even fairly gently, your contacts will almost certainly get dry very quickly. I've had contacts fall out this way also. Wetting your eyes between runs won't really do anything. Relatively dry air blowing even gently will remove whatever moisture is there in a matter of seconds or less.

 

Generally, my solution has been to find different goggles that let the air in at a place and in direction so that the airflow right across the eye is minimal.

 

If you're closing the vents, and still having the problem, it may be that the goggles aren't snug on your face, or that the open/close mechanism only closes some of the vents.

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by rguy View Post

 

As to the type of contact lens I wear, it is soft lens. But due to the strong myopia and astigmatism I have, they are much thicker than normal, especially on the bottom part. They also cost a lot more, and having weekly disposables is not an option. The best I can get is 4 pairs for a year costing a few hundred $. Nevertheless, bring a pair as backup is a good idea until I get this problem solved.

 

I understand the concept of lens curvature. Two years ago when my eye doctor check me out, I was told the fit was great, and I continued to use the same brand/perscription lens which I had been using for 3+ years prior. So I am not convinced that the curvature is the problem. The other things is the air flow/dryness problem affects one of my eyes a lot more than the other, which also leads me to think this particular pair of goggle may be faulty. 

 

 



Because of your astigmatism, this lens is thicker on the bottom since it has to sit in the correct orientation. Do you wear lenses for astigmatism in both eyes or just the one? I'd still pursue trying trying a lens with a different base curve. I've found that most lenses seem to fit most people pretty well in the office, but in real world application, you may find that a different lens fits better. There are now a lot of 2-week and daily wear astigmatism (called "toric) contacts on the market that weren't available even a few years ago. I honestly don't think you should be a wearing a 3-month lens in 2012. 

post #17 of 22

I have astigmatism and wear toric lenses, no problem.  I used to have these "weighted" lenses, but that was YEARS ago.  The new ones I have are much "wetter" and more comfortable.  

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post

Look at goggles designed for racing. These are the goggles that I personally can't stand. Because they have very little front-facing vents. I run hot and I look for goggles with maximum ventilation. I'll put up with a little wind on my contacts at 40+mph to avoid fogging at low speeds or on wet days. POC, Shred and Briko all make race goggles that have no vents in the lenses.


THe new (not so new) Smith I/O & I/Os are two other goggles with no vents on the lens face. Probably somewhere between the racing goggles specified by Sinecure and your current vented lens units. 

 

Comparison of the top/side/bottom vents between goggle models may also be helpful. Usually the thcker the goggle (frame depth front to rear) the large the vents. Larger vents = more air flow.      
 

 

post #19 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kauffee View Post

Because of your astigmatism, this lens is thicker on the bottom since it has to sit in the correct orientation. Do you wear lenses for astigmatism in both eyes or just the one? I'd still pursue trying trying a lens with a different base curve. I've found that most lenses seem to fit most people pretty well in the office, but in real world application, you may find that a different lens fits better. There are now a lot of 2-week and daily wear astigmatism (called "toric) contacts on the market that weren't available even a few years ago. I honestly don't think you should be a wearing a 3-month lens in 2012. 


+1

 

I'm also quite myopic and have astigmatism. Today's daily wear lenses give me superb distance correction, just what you want for skiing. They're so flexible they rarely shift out of position and almost never come out unless I'm pokin' around up there.  

 

YMMV of course, but as they're so inexpensive it really would be pretty painless to try them.
 

 

post #20 of 22

I use toric soft lenses, monthlies.  In my backpack I always keep my "eye kit" with contact lens case, small bottle of contact lens fluid, eye drops and glasses in case I need to take the contacts out.  If anything, I remove them at the end of the day before I drive home, but that's rare.  Still, I like to be prepared.  (I also carry my insulin with me, so it's kind of a thing to be prepared.)

 

The Smith I/Os has been a great goggle for me, great ventilation, no fogging and no problems with eyes drying due to airflow.

 

 

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by kauffee View Post

I'm an ophthalmologist, so I'll let everyone else focus on the goggles and I'll focus on the contact lens (though an optometrist would be even better here)...

 

The contact lens may not be fitting you correctly, either. If you look on the package, what is the base curve of the lens? (It should be a number between 8 and 9, eg 8.7) If the lens is too steep or flat, it may not fit well on your eye and may be more prone to popping out.

Our local doc has nailed this one I believe.  (Hi doc!)  :)

 

Your first stop should be to your optometrist.  I would further go so far as to strongly suggest you see him/her at least once a year if your Rx and lenses are even half of what you state they are in terms of fit and function.  Any less, particularly as active as you are, and you're doing yourself (and your sight) a disservice.  We operate a specialty contact lens clinic as part of our ptactice here (four optometrists) and we see a lot of what you're describing.  And again, Dr Kauffee is correct - you may have a large number of alternative lens options that either didn't exist when you were fit, or simply weren't tried for any number of reasons during your last exam and fitting.

 

Now as to the goggle question - you want air flow.  The real question is how much.  If you cut it off entirely, you will fog almost instantly, even in the best of conditions.  I do not believe the goggles are the culprit here for a minute, although a different model of Smith optics goggle frame might suit you better, or at least offer a different air flow rate and pattern that is more comfortable for your personal needs.  We sell a large number of them here actually.

 

BUT

 

Before you start throwing money at something that may or may not be the root cause - talk to your optometrist.  Or ask a different optometrist.  Get your eyes checked out at LEAST once every year.  Trust me - just do it.  Two years is too long, and you my friend deserve to see better than what you've got now!  :)  If I can be of any particular assistance, don't hesitate to let me know via PM if you prefer.

 

Best to you!

 

Brian~

 

 

post #22 of 22

In addition to the fit, there are a wide variation in what lenses are made of - high or low moisture content, different base materials.  Changing brands or styles might fix your problems.  Now if you have a tough prescription, that might reduce the range that is available, but it is worth asking.

 

I had forgotten about it, but the soft contacts I had about 20 years ago would blink out of my eye when they dried out.  The ones I have now don't do that.

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