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Leki: Aluminum poles vs. carbon composite vs. carbon--confused

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hey!

I originally purchased a pair of Rosignol Experience aluminum ski poles for $30.  After trying out my instructor's graphite poles, I decided shelling out more $$ for poles that were easier to swing would be a smart investment.  I also noticed my Rosignol aluminum poles bent easily.

 

So I returned my Rosignol aluminum poles and purchased a pair of Leki poles for $90 that I thought were carbon composite.  I like Leki's trigger system, which keeps the poles right where they should be and made swinging poles easier.

 

Anyway, in a thread down this page I realized that my poles may be aluminum.  I'm not sure if they're aluminum.  The price tag on my poles says""Vantage Trigger" and the pole itself say Leki Vantage, and at the top it says 18 TS 4.5 Series.  So then it would seem that the pole I have is the Vantage Trigger S?

http://www.leki.com/skiing/skiingPole.php?pID=208

 

Another poster on this board said that the above poles are aluminum, but I can;'t find any info to confirm that.  I thought the poles were carbon composite because the little brochure that came with the poles listed the materials used as carbon composite, but one page later lists aluminum.  If anyone can make sense of this for me, that'd be great.

 

Assuming that my poles are aluminum, I have some questions:

 

1) Are these $90 aluminum Leki poles less likely to bend that $30 Rosignol Poles?

 

2) Would the Leki poles that are actually carbon composite or carbon be less likely to bend or break?   Would they be substantially lighter?

 

3) In your opinion, is it worth returning the aluminum Leki poles for carbon composite/carbon poles given that they may be only $10-20 more expensive?

 

Thanks!

 

Matt

 

post #2 of 10

I have the same pair of aluminum poles I've used for almost 30 years.  They were one of the first models to feature pop out straps.  They are still perfectly straight as arrows.  I also have some Goode carbon poles, also with pop out straps.  I still prefer the aluminum ones, mostly because they have soft wide leather straps formed perfectly to my wrists and palms.

 

I'd keep both sets of poles if I were you.  Super expensive poles have a way of disappearing from outside the lodge while unattended.

 

Pole quivers are useful.  I recommend using your skinniest poles with your fattest skis and your fatter aluminum poles with your skinnier groomer skis.

post #3 of 10

Do you like the Leki poles you bought?

Their aluminum poles can be very good.  If you have to deal with kids, use the aluminum they're better for wacking. -j/k

It really all comes down to feel and swing. Lighter is not necess better. Your're going to have to try them in the store.

I never really liked the goodes for that reason, and wasn't all that upset when I broke them playing ski golf in the spring.

 

A carbon fiber pole will break - especially at the tips. Usually you can fix the tip breaks, but not always.

I snapped a pole in half, a Scott in half cause it got stuck on the chairlift when I got off.

The carbon fiber Lekis can get way more than 10-20$ more expensive than what you have.

Is it less likely to bend? Possibly

My only beef is with those trigger things they insist on using.

post #4 of 10

I have both Kerma carbon and Scott aluminum poles as well as Goode composite poles and several Leki race poles. I just got a new set of Leki aluminum poles (Rocs), they have a really, really nice grip and I like the trigger release feature (I once had a pole get caught in a webbing fence at the end of a race course). A couple of observations from my experience: the most durable poles seem to be the Goode composite - nothing bother them. The carbon poles can be a sensitive to certain kinds of impacts - I whacked my boots to clear some snow before stepping into my bindings - the pole snapped. (Kerma replaced it no questions asked and were very nice). I only use the handle end now for clearing snow. The alu poles can bend but I have not had any of mine bend. I had an injury a couple of years ago  and really appreciated the lightness of the carbon at the time, but I've gone back for most of my skiing to my cheapest poles - the Goode composites, bought used one day on the way to the mountain when I realized I'd forgotten mine.

post #5 of 10

I will also vouch for the goode composite- I have had mine for about 9 years and never once had a problem and never once wished that I had a different set of poles

post #6 of 10

 

- your pole is aluminum alloy with an 18mm shaft; the 4.5 grade tells you it is comparable to poles like the Gabel Team Alpine, Swix Techlite Pro, Masters Team Red, essentially anything labeled 'F45' -18mm

 

- the extra cost is in the brand name and the grip system, the shafts will not be significantly more resistant to bending than your Rossis.   Higher end aluminum poles will have designations like F65 (6.5 in Lekispeak) or FTS (TS in Lekispeak) and will be more resistant to bending.   Carbon and composite poles will be resistant to /staying/ bent.

 

- how much do you like the Trigger system and do you need lighter swing weight for some reason?

 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post

Hey!

I originally purchased a pair of Rosignol Experience aluminum ski poles for $30.  After trying out my instructor's graphite poles, I decided shelling out more $$ for poles that were easier to swing would be a smart investment.  I also noticed my Rosignol aluminum poles bent easily.

 

So I returned my Rosignol aluminum poles and purchased a pair of Leki poles for $90 that I thought were carbon composite.  I like Leki's trigger system, which keeps the poles right where they should be and made swinging poles easier.

 

Anyway, in a thread down this page I realized that my poles may be aluminum.  I'm not sure if they're aluminum.  The price tag on my poles says""Vantage Trigger" and the pole itself say Leki Vantage, and at the top it says 18 TS 4.5 Series.  So then it would seem that the pole I have is the Vantage Trigger S?

http://www.leki.com/skiing/skiingPole.php?pID=208

 

Another poster on this board said that the above poles are aluminum, but I can;'t find any info to confirm that.  I thought the poles were carbon composite because the little brochure that came with the poles listed the materials used as carbon composite, but one page later lists aluminum.  If anyone can make sense of this for me, that'd be great.

 

Assuming that my poles are aluminum, I have some questions:

 

1) Are these $90 aluminum Leki poles less likely to bend that $30 Rosignol Poles?

 

2) Would the Leki poles that are actually carbon composite or carbon be less likely to bend or break?   Would they be substantially lighter?

 

3) In your opinion, is it worth returning the aluminum Leki poles for carbon composite/carbon poles given that they may be only $10-20 more expensive?

 

Thanks!

 

Matt

 



 


Edited by cantunamunch - 1/31/12 at 7:05pm
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

- your pole is aluminum alloy with an 18mm shaft; the 4.5 grade tells you it is comparable to poles like the Gabel Team Alpine, Swix Techlite Pro, Masters Team Red, essentially anything labeled 'F45' -18mm

- the extra cost is in the brand name and the grip system, they will not be significantly more resistant to bending.

- how much do you like the Trigger system and do you need lighter swing weight for some reason?

 
 



 

Ok, got  it.  Cantunamunch, you make it sound like the poles I got are a ripoff?  What do you think about the two poles I wrote about below?

 

I really like the trigger system, and it's made pole planting less fatiguing.  In terms of needing lower swing weight, the left side of my body including my left arm is slightly less sensitive and less strong than the right side.  I am able to swing with my left arm a bit easier with a lighter weight pole.  Does that make sense?  Even if the Leki's aren't lighter than the cheaper poles I had, I found pole plants were much less fatiguing, perhaps because I did not need to grip the pole to keep it in place.

 

It seems like the Leki Project 18 is made of carbon, and the Leki Composite 16S is made of carbon composite.  Are these assumptions correct?  Would these be much lighter than my pole?  Would they be less susceptible to bending and would they be more durable overall? 

 

Here's a link to the two poles that I'm referring to:

 

Leki Project 18

http://www.amazon.com/LEKI-Project-Black-Green-115cm/dp/B005W1D6B2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328065284&sr=8-1

 

Leki Composite 16S

http://www.amazon.com/Leki-Composite-Pole-Charcoal-52-Inch/dp/B005DD33EE/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1328065237&sr=8-2

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post

Ok, got  it.  Cantunamunch, you make it sound like the poles I got are a ripoff? 

 

Not a ripoff - just that you're essentially paying a premium for the trigger system and the 2-year warranty.

 

Certainly, if you have a demonstrable use for a lighter swing weight you should get it.

 

The Project 18 is still aluminum, just a higher grade alloy (and with a fancier grip than what you have now).   My daily use poles are comparable to this (just with a much simpler grip).   Noticeably less susceptible to bending than what you have now and marginally lower swing weight.

 

The Comp 16S  - yes, yes, and probably more durable than your current poles so long as you don't score/deepscratch the shafts (or crack the tips off like I somehow managed to do on the metal-grid deck on teh Snowbird tram- see Tog's post above.)

post #9 of 10

Cantuna is giving good info. 

No, I don't think you got ripped off.  Could you buy those poles in March for 60$ ? Probably if they still have your size though.

 

It really comes down to what you like. Some rental poles are good if you could only change the grip.  Do not underestimate the grip!

I actually rented a pole once which was so bad I had to tell the shop people. (the guy thought i was crazy). I think it was a Rossi. The pole was flexible in a way that it resonated in a big wave after each touch.  It was extremely annoying.  That's the only time I couldn't stand a pole.

 

No one "needs" light poles, nor do they "need" 6 pairs of skis.

Poles do make a difference in your experience though, so I'm in full support of buying good ones.  What's good is up to you.

A lighter pole makes a difference in fast short turns.

The big advantage to less expensive aluminum ones is you don't have to worry so much about them. 

  • They don't get stolen.
  • They bend but if they're decent you can still use them.
  • You can hit things with them - like tree branches full of snow/ice etc. and not worry.
  • You can throw them around and not worry. Like in the back of a car. You pile skis, boots, etc on good carbon poles, then someone falls on the pile, they can break or get scarred.

 

Still I must say those Leki carbon or carbon/aluminum poles are damned nice.

Everybody has their personal likes.  You see above people like goode. I don't like the pencil thin ones, I feel even heavier thicker ones have a better swing, but that's my preference.  I did have a goode once where I had the thing bent like a fishing rod.  It was the only thing holding me on a very steep slope. It didn't break - we all thought it would, it was really bent.

 

I would say though, that buying poles from amazon is....I don't know, very dissatisfying.  You can find deals through a ski shop.

post #10 of 10

I just held my Carbon 14s and my older aluminum falcon trigger side by side and the weight difference is pretty negligible. They have different swing feel. and have bit of spring. I wouldn't worry about it.

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