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Hitting it hard every time, do you? Or...

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 

can you still enjoy skiing if you don't ?

 

I used to hit it hard every time, always looking for the hardest, challenging runs.

But nowadays I find it unnecessary. I can be happy with almost anything, every ski day is different.

Some days I just feel like cruising, some days I'll hike.

 

With the exception of a pow day.....then I'm like a kid in a candy store.

post #2 of 38

+1

post #3 of 38

There are no hard runs in my neck of the woods, I still enjoy every skiing day.

 

As to skiing hard, I get enough skiing these days that I can take a day off when skiing with friends and family so they can keep up, and I don't miss it at all.  When skiing alone, I take it easy if nursing an injury, but unless that injury is severe, I usually start out being good, but forget to take it easy in short order. 

 

Sometimes a little silent voice inside my head cautions me to tone it down or not to hit something (like a little cliff/jump off the side of the trail), although I can't see any real danger in hitting it, I've learned the hard way to listen to that voice.  I still enjoy my day, even without hitting it or making that high g degree turn just in front of the lift tower, or at the edge of the trail.

 

I'm happy with that.

post #4 of 38

If the snow is good I'll ski hard from bell to destruction (of my legs).  When the natural snow is not so good I'll slap on some skinny skis and cruise (hard).  When the snow is hard and the mountain is crowded (Saturdays) I may ski the first two or three hours then go do some laundry.

 

When I'm at home preparing for a ski trip I train with skiing hard every day in mind.  The older I get, though, the less this translates to the reality of my aching muscles.

 

See ya on the groom today!

post #5 of 38

I use Warren Millers words of wisdom for my skiing pleasure; the worst day of skiing is better than the best day at work. Some days I have to kill it to feel like it was worth the drive, other times just making turns can be spiritual, relaxing and very zen like.

post #6 of 38
I virtually lose track of all every-day thoughts when I start sliding. I'll go hard one run or maybe ten, easy the next one or few, and just get absorbed in the process. That is, when I could ski. Now it'll be next season. My last season-ending injury was in 1996. At 72, I'm hoping to go another 20 years without injury and then retire.
post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by k2skier View Post

I use Warren Millers words of wisdom for my skiing pleasure; the worst day of skiing is better than the best day at work.



I gotta disagree with that.  My worst day of skiing ended with an ACL tear that haunted me for 2+ years.  Even my worst work days don't last that long and I feel pretty good after a good day's work. 

 

post #8 of 38


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post

 

See ya on the groom today!


The groom was good today biggrin.gif

 

 

post #9 of 38

I used to feel like I needed to prove something to myself, and would ski double diamond terrain pretty much every ski day, even when I knew there was terrible snow and I would be skiing 50*+ pitches on nasty iced over crust.

 

I also got in less ski days then too, which I am sure makes a difference.

 

These days, I typically save the really gnarly terrain for powder days, and the difficulty of the rest of what I ski is directly related to how long it has been since the last storm. If its been a few days, I'll usually ski a few runs in some trees and mix that in with a lot of groomed stuff, if all of the powder has been skied out, I'll probably be skiing 80% of my day on groomed snow, with a few mogul drops mixed in.

 

I don't feel the need to ski the hardest crap on the hill day in and day out just to prove to myself I can. I'd rather save it for the days when it is a true joy.

 

I spent the end of the week on the front range, and so didn't get my normal weekend ski days in. On the way back home to the Western Slope, we stopped and skied from 10-4 at Ski Cooper. There isn't a meaningful pitch on the entire mountain, but that didn't stop us from having lots of fun- I was able to give my fiance pointers on skiing trees (she is terrified of this), and got to ski a lot of warp-speed groomers and give her some carving pointers. It was a helluva fun day even without any real difficulty.

post #10 of 38

Where'd all this zen one-ness with the universe come from?

I still hit it hard whenever I can. 

(Hard relative to my own limits, anyway.)

 

 

post #11 of 38
How hard I ski depends on how well I'm skiing that day, I'm sure most people have good days and bad.
post #12 of 38

I mix it up about 60/40 hard runs to easier cruisers.  Usually the easier runs are later in the day when I am whooped from the harder runs.

 

As my local hills are mostly easier I will sometimes look for the hardest line available just to make the day interesting.  I will look for frozen crud or icy slopes and do my best on them.  I treat those runs as training for when I am vacationing at the big resorts and make a wrong turn and end up on a steep icy or cruddy slope.

 

Rick G

post #13 of 38

I take what conditions give. I don't try to make something out of nothing. I ski in harmony with the mountain. And I work pretty hard most of the time.

post #14 of 38

Ditto. If it's a pow day, then I'm a kid in the white room. If it's a bluebird, 4-5 day dry spell, and there's nothing but groomers, then that's fine. Only time I'm not going to hit it, is when it's 35F at the summit and raining....

post #15 of 38

So far this season "hitting it hard" hasn't even been an option in Tahoe.  But any day of skiing is still fun.  When there's fresh tracks to be had, I tend to go for the most challenging stuff first thing (after a warm up run), but if it's a groomer day I'll actually do the opposite since some of the fun but more mellow trails will get scraped and packed much faster.

post #16 of 38

At this point (nagging injury) hitting us many fresh lines as I can. Ripping some steeps, and some tree's. And out in a couple of hours due to pain. Hopefully a combination of some surgery, and some technique improvements will extend my days.

post #17 of 38
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Where'd all this zen one-ness with the universe come from?

I still hit it hard whenever I can. 

(Hard relative to my own limits, anyway.)

 

 



Maybe it's a living in the mtns. thing.......

Not everyone gets it, oh well.

 

post #18 of 38

It all depends on he day - there are so many variables from mountain conditions to feeling "in the groove" or "out of the grove" on any particular day.  

 

Some days, I arrive at the mountain planning to hit it hard of piste (hit it hard is all relative, so for me anyway...), and it just isn't working for me, but groomers are working for me that day -so I adapt to whatever makes it a "good day on the mountain".

post #19 of 38

I just ski...some days there is powder and I start earlier and go longer but I'm still just skiing.  Skiing isn't hard or easy...it's just skiing.  I have no goals or targets I just go where I feel like going at that moment.  

post #20 of 38

Enjoyed the many fine posts. I'm with Kneale Brownson (above), especially!!! beercheer.gif

 

Additional random observations based in nothing more than my two cents: "skiing hard" is relative across the skier's age, conditioning, psychological factors, proficiency level, and the inherent challenges of any particular resort, eh?

 

My thirty-two year old son finds my hardest days "easy." My first few days each season are significantly "harder" than the last few days, even though I make far more runs on more difficult terrain as the season closes. Deep or true powder days always seem "easier" rather than "harder" for me, likely because powder is so psychologically energizing.

 

As the decades have gone by, I ski harder terrain more easily than before, and I can ski longer. Simple explanation: improved equipment (the skis and boots today are flat ass amazing) and many, many private L3 lessons that have improved my technique and lessened my dependence on sheer muscle and energy.

 

Finally, at last report a fatigued, near exhausted skier is far more susceptible to injury. I draw the conclusion skiing hard does not mean skiing to the point of over-fatigue, even exhaustion.

post #21 of 38

Seems to be there are 2 definitions here.

 

There's going just for difficult terrain, (and just surviving) or making your way down one way or another.

 

Or doing intermediate and easier terrain but still pushing yourself hard there.

So you can still "hit it hard" on the groomers and get a workout trying to drive in some perfect turns into ice or hardpack, even though you had the skill and option to just bomb your way straight down.

post #22 of 38
To me skiing hard is pushing yourself to your limits, doesn't matter where on the mountain.
post #23 of 38

I don't like the feeling of "doing battle" on the ski hill. If I feel that way, something's wrong with my technique! Same thing if I'm getting prematurely sore in the quads (ie in the backseat). The most joyous moments of skiing for me involve effortless turns in complex terrain. e.g. when a bump run or a gladed run feels like a controlled groomer run. 

 

By the same token, the second-most joyous moments of skiing involve flow down steep terrain. There aren't many runs at Whistler I can't ski in reasonable conditions at this point (as long as they don't involve straightlining) though there are definitely lines I still can't ski. I try to always do something new every ski day. So maybe that counts as "hitting it hard".

post #24 of 38

I'm not pedal to the metal every run, but I try to keep focused on skiing when I'm moving; paying attention to the terrain, my movement and position, and any obstacles. I'll definitely try and do a set or two a day that I know will be a stretch; turn-wise, control-wise, or something.

 

I love the feeling of a great run when all that exists are you, the snow, and the edges of your skis.

post #25 of 38

I hit it pretty hard most days.   I have 29 days in so far this season and I'm still sore today?

post #26 of 38

As a 60 year old female who slammed into a tree a few seasons back, my priority is coming home safe every day.  I'll try different things to stave off boredom and I certainly want to do things that challenge me somewhat, but I just like being out there and enjoying the day.  I'd rather have 75 days of tamer skiing than miss the rest of the season because I did something dumb.  "Dumb" changes as the season progresses.  

post #27 of 38

I like to have a nice warm up, spend the majority of my day going hard, pushing myself to get better, etc. (whatever that means for me), and then take the last run or two to have that feel good, zen-like experience during which I am one with the mountain, my skis, the fresh air, etc. During those runs, even if I've had a frustrating day that makes me feel like I've made no progress or done nothing well, I focus on my breathing and feeling/hearing the skis on the snow (bear in mind I ski the midwest/ice coast most often) so that I can walk off the mountain in a state of mind to go back the next day/week/season with a fresh outlook.

 

This approach is a more recent adoption of mine. Trekchick is the one who told me it's what she tries to do, and I've happily joined her. It's only now, when I am sitting at home unable to ski for the season, that I am REALLY appreciating this approach. I know my days on the snow last season we were well spent and that my last run was a pleasure . . . Looking forward to the '12 - '13 season!

post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I take what conditions give. I don't try to make something out of nothing. I ski in harmony with the mountain. And I work pretty hard most of the time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post

I just ski...some days there is powder and I start earlier and go longer but I'm still just skiing.  Skiing isn't hard or easy...it's just skiing.  I have no goals or targets I just go where I feel like going at that moment. 
 

+1

hit it hard ?  chattering down some broken re-frozen is generally not high on anyone's list of fun...

but skiing hard surfaces is a technique workout, and is fun in it's own way.

mostly I'm limited by aerobic capacity these days. being a sea level dweller, I get gassed when at Mammoth altitudes (main lodge is at 8800 ft, top is at 11,000)

 

I prefer steep/deep or woods - the skiing becomes most interesting when there is 'terrain'. and all of a sudden it's 3:30...

but I'm happy enough to just slide down a groomer, if that's whats available - but then the day is shorter.

 

I do remember hammering hard in my younger days, when the hill and conditions were limited - much more a small hill issue than most of what we have out west...

 

going beyond physical limits is a very dangerous thing - so I work hard at getting my overall conditioning as high as it can be, before I hit the hill...

in spite of that awareness, I could still use some more off-hill work...

 

mountain time is precious to me and never quite enough. I don;t carry a cell, I don't listen to music, I don't chat a huge amount, I DO want the moment, and then next one...

Hit it hard ???  I don;t think about it, but I did dose off on the bus back into town, on Sunday, and that seems to happen a lot more these daze.

post #29 of 38
For me it depends on the day. A huge pow day?! (Squaw) Nose to fingers, by then headwall will be spinning for some upper mtn love. On other days just searching out the good snow taking it mellow. Find the right aspect and hit it all over the hill.
post #30 of 38
Thread Starter 

Awesome responses.

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