EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Fitness, Health, Nutrition, Injury, and Recovery › Anyone else end their season early with an ACL tear? (looking for some comradery)
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Anyone else end their season early with an ACL tear? (looking for some comradery) - Page 2

post #31 of 55

Got my ACL done (ski, then soccer) 20 years ago.  Just back to skiing after a long break for family and career, finally got my wife and kids up on skis.

 

Hey, it's more fun than ever!  20 years of gear improvements - amazing!  I'm wearing the brace just for insurance.  ACL repairs have improved over the last 20 yrs as well.

 

Bought my somewhat reckless oldest son Kneebindings (they won't protect against snowboarders, tho).

 

One season is an eyeblink.  Do your PT.  I'm rehabbing a class 3 shoulder separation right now (bike/dodging a little girl).

 

Lots of skiing left in your future.  The west will still be there.

 

Good luck with the snowboarders.  I just got some impressive air (followed by an impressive ski release) when a young man entered my trail from the side, bonked a snowpile, and stopped right in front of me.  Outstanding lack of periperal vision.  But I didn't kill or even injure him.  Ski on!

post #32 of 55

Have been sitting out since a bad railslide since Dec 13th.  Diagnosis inguinal strain.  Will sit out Feb, since i still have pain.  Hoping to be back in March.  At least you can repair your injury.  Mine is just a wait out.  If ligaments were damaged, then it could be resting for the entire season.  The cryopack will be your friend.icon14.gif

post #33 of 55
Thread Starter 

thanks for checking in, everybody. it really does make me feel better.

post #34 of 55

I feel your pain.  I got hurt Dec. 7th.  Didn't get on the mountain once this year.  I usually ski the poconos and make one trip to Vermont each year. 

post #35 of 55

After only 3 days back on skis after over a decade off the slopes, injured knee on 2/3. Felt a pop while compressing a mogul. Rode the toboggan of shame and snowmobile to ski patrol. Had to take the ambulance to ER. ER did xrays and basically said bone is okay, but you need an MRI. Went to ortho Tuesday and he thinks it is ACL.Was supposed to have MRI on Friday but insurance hasn't approved it yet. Now I won't know results until next Friday. I'm just trying to get range of motion of back--can straighten all the way, but not bend yet. The waiting is killing me. I want to start rehab now!

post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

After only 3 days back on skis after over a decade off the slopes, injured knee on 2/3. Felt a pop while compressing a mogul. Rode the toboggan of shame and snowmobile to ski patrol. Had to take the ambulance to ER. ER did xrays and basically said bone is okay, but you need an MRI. Went to ortho Tuesday and he thinks it is ACL.Was supposed to have MRI on Friday but insurance hasn't approved it yet. Now I won't know results until next Friday. I'm just trying to get range of motion of back--can straighten all the way, but not bend yet. The waiting is killing me. I want to start rehab now!

Yeah, sounds ACL-ish.  I am one week post-op myself.  Did you know there is a long running acl recon thread?http://www.epicski.com/t/108804/life-after-acl-reconstruction/210#post_1544244

Sorry to welcome you to our club, but welcome to epicski.

post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghetto3jon View Post

I tore my ACL two weeks ago (hit by a snowboarder). Now I'm sitting around waiting for surgery (2/29). I just canceled all my scheduled trips, including a week at Vail (I'm a 20-year east coast skier, never been out west before).

 

Needless to say, I'm pretty heartbroken. So! Anyone else watching tennis, waiting for next season? I'm not alone, right? 

 

You're not alone. I broke my fibula on my third day on the mountain this season (Dec 3rd) - had surgery Dec 10th with plates and screws - and felt really sorry for myself for a while. Same deal - lots of cancelled trips and wasted vacation time. 

 

But, two months out I'm feeling so much better! There have been ups and downs, challenges (right after surgery not having mobility or control was frustrating beyond belief). And if one more person from work said to me "Must be nice to have all this time off - hope you're enjoying your vacation" ...I thought I was going to go postal! If they only knew how it was killing me to sit around and do nothing but wait and heal until I could actually weight bear, etc....ugh! Your feelings are valid - but I promise it WILL get better.

 

After surgery make sure you get a physical therapist - that has been the key to my recovery. He's awesome. I am going to the gym, doing something every day to get back in shape and then some...

 

Now, I see this a little blip in my life. Missed this ski season....well, that sucks, but it's not THAT big of a deal in the grand scheme of things. At least this was an injury I CAN recover from. I expect to be 100% for skiing next year. Hell, maybe even better - I'm determined more than ever now to get in shape and get better all around. It has taught me patience and perspective. And I think I'll be a better nurse now for being on the other side of things as a patient.

 

Check out my thread "Fibula/ankle fracture - need a pep talk"  - not sure how to link it, sorry. But a lot of great people responded and gave me advice that might help you too!!

post #38 of 55

Went to orthopedic surgeon for MRI results:

 

Bad News: High grade (complete) ACL tear.
Good News: No breaks. Meniscus, Cartilage, and other ligaments intact. Good ROM, minimal pain, minimal swelling, no giving out, full weight-bearing. Slight limp.

Physical therapy 2-3 times per week for 4-6 weeks and then reassess stability and try some real activity to see how the knee behaves. If it gives out during that time, then definitely will have surgery. The ortho doesn't think it is necessary to wait to try aggressive activity until fall. I might even get to try to ski. We decided I'd rather just lose one ski season instead of two. :)

 

Been reading a lot on who are the best candidates for the non-surgical approach. So far, I'm a candidate. The big positive is no other tears--especially the meniscus. The other is that I haven't had any other periods of instability (my knee hasn't "given out" except for the initial injury.) There are several "hop tests" that I will do with the physical therapist during rehab and those seem to be one of the best predictors for success without surgery. Quad strength and knee laxity really don't seem to predict success or failure. Just hope I was born with the "right" body structure to try the non-surgical route.

 

What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities.

post #39 of 55

Sorry you are in the ACL-less club for sure.  Having a solid meniscus makes a big difference.  Being a coper has it's pros and cons.  There is no downside to doing PT for a couple months before making a decision about surgery.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

Went to orthopedic surgeon for MRI results:

 

Bad News: High grade (complete) ACL tear.
Good News: No breaks. Meniscus, Cartilage, and other ligaments intact. Good ROM, minimal pain, minimal swelling, no giving out, full weight-bearing. Slight limp.

Physical therapy 2-3 times per week for 4-6 weeks and then reassess stability and try some real activity to see how the knee behaves. If it gives out during that time, then definitely will have surgery. The ortho doesn't think it is necessary to wait to try aggressive activity until fall. I might even get to try to ski. We decided I'd rather just lose one ski season instead of two. :)

 

Been reading a lot on who are the best candidates for the non-surgical approach. So far, I'm a candidate. The big positive is no other tears--especially the meniscus. The other is that I haven't had any other periods of instability (my knee hasn't "given out" except for the initial injury.) There are several "hop tests" that I will do with the physical therapist during rehab and those seem to be one of the best predictors for success without surgery. Quad strength and knee laxity really don't seem to predict success or failure. Just hope I was born with the "right" body structure to try the non-surgical route.

 

What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities.

post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

Went to orthopedic surgeon for MRI results:

 

Bad News: High grade (complete) ACL tear.
Good News: No breaks. Meniscus, Cartilage, and other ligaments intact. Good ROM, minimal pain, minimal swelling, no giving out, full weight-bearing. Slight limp.

Physical therapy 2-3 times per week for 4-6 weeks and then reassess stability and try some real activity to see how the knee behaves. If it gives out during that time, then definitely will have surgery. The ortho doesn't think it is necessary to wait to try aggressive activity until fall. I might even get to try to ski. We decided I'd rather just lose one ski season instead of two. :)

 

Been reading a lot on who are the best candidates for the non-surgical approach. So far, I'm a candidate. The big positive is no other tears--especially the meniscus. The other is that I haven't had any other periods of instability (my knee hasn't "given out" except for the initial injury.) There are several "hop tests" that I will do with the physical therapist during rehab and those seem to be one of the best predictors for success without surgery. Quad strength and knee laxity really don't seem to predict success or failure. Just hope I was born with the "right" body structure to try the non-surgical route.

 

What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities.


I am a coper (41 years old).  Full ACL tear with level 2 LCL strain and bone bruise on Dec. 10, 2011.  Tried to ski out of a fall, phantom foot and then pop.  No damage to meniscus and minimal swelling.  My knee fooled two doctors who thought it was a meniscus tear due to the stability.  MRI told the truth. Met with a good Ortho who handles all knee injuries for University of Wisconsin football team and teaches at UW (and is an avid skier).  Did PT and the last day was doing cuts and single leg long jumps.  They both recommended to go the non-surgecial rout and wear a brace (I know there is differing opinions with the brace).  I only missed 3 weeks last year and am at 35+ days this year.  The OS actually used me as an example for his residents.  He had each of them check my injured knee first and they all looked puzzled.  He then had them compare it to the good knee and they then saw the difference.  My bad knee movement was 4.4mm and my good knee was 0.  This is why the other two docs I saw missed it.  Had they checked just the injured knee, they very likely would have misdiagnosed as well.  I lift weights for exercise and the PT felt strong hamstrings are good compensators for an ALC deficient knee (I love dead lifts).

 

I fully agree with your statement "What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities."  I still questions if I shouldn't just get it done but I have never had a stability issue and am skiing better than I ever have.  The mental healing was the hardest (i.e. if I do this, what would happen to my knee).  The best thing I did was get a lesson from a PSIA level III instructor who had been there done that.  I had changed my skiing last year to compensate for the injury and needed to unlearn bad habits.  This helped my confidence and cleared my head some as well.

 

Good luck!

post #41 of 55

Always good to hear from another coper who is skiing at a high level.  There are many, including instructors and experts over 45, but they tend not to post as much as those who opt for ACL reconstruction surgery.  Even more copers in Europe where the medical system makes insurance coverage for ACLr surgery more complicated, especially for older folks.

 

My ACL pop was not skiing.  Level 2 MCL strain, small meniscus tear that could heal without intervention.  June 2012 so plenty of time for rehab before ski season started.  Never had a measurement done, but the laxity my ortho surgeon showed me was minimal.

 

I'm doing more lessons this season, also with Level 3 instructors, in order to refine my technique as much as possible before heading out to the Rockies in late March.  Making good use of the Senior Clinic at my little home mountain.

 

So far, I've skied without a brace.  My ortho left the decision up to me (he doesn't ski).  I'm a 56 year old advanced skier, but not aggressive.  Like powder in bowls and trees, happy to leave moguls alone but will do a run or two if there is an out available and my ski buddy of the day wants to go there.  Enjoy groomers too.  I'll probably stick to watching others when it comes to steeps that involve narrow chutes.  Have done just enough steeps to know what it's like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by roverdisco View Post

I am a coper (41 years old).  Full ACL tear with level 2 LCL strain and bone bruise on Dec. 10, 2011.  Tried to ski out of a fall, phantom foot and then pop.  No damage to meniscus and minimal swelling.  My knee fooled two doctors who thought it was a meniscus tear due to the stability.  MRI told the truth. Met with a good Ortho who handles all knee injuries for University of Wisconsin football team and teaches at UW (and is an avid skier).  Did PT and the last day was doing cuts and single leg long jumps.  They both recommended to go the non-surgecial rout and wear a brace (I know there is differing opinions with the brace).  I only missed 3 weeks last year and am at 35+ days this year.  The OS actually used me as an example for his residents.  He had each of them check my injured knee first and they all looked puzzled.  He then had them compare it to the good knee and they then saw the difference.  My bad knee movement was 4.4mm and my good knee was 0.  This is why the other two docs I saw missed it.  Had they checked just the injured knee, they very likely would have misdiagnosed as well.  I lift weights for exercise and the PT felt strong hamstrings are good compensators for an ALC deficient knee (I love dead lifts).

 

I fully agree with your statement "What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities."  I still questions if I shouldn't just get it done but I have never had a stability issue and am skiing better than I ever have.  The mental healing was the hardest (i.e. if I do this, what would happen to my knee).  The best thing I did was get a lesson from a PSIA level III instructor who had been there done that.  I had changed my skiing last year to compensate for the injury and needed to unlearn bad habits.  This helped my confidence and cleared my head some as well.

 

Good luck!

post #42 of 55

The highlighted area in Red is something that I just went through this past year.

 

I had a complete rupture of the ACL in Jan 2012.  I went to an Ortho in Truckee, CA highly recommend by the mountain guys... 

 

Long story short, I was diagnosed with rupture, Dr. said, "you have 3.5 months left of ski season, you can't do much more damage"  

 

Wrong, I took 4 weeks off with rehab.... slapped on Don Joy Brace... and ended up with a Bone Bruise that ended up hurting so bad I couldn't ski or walk for any long distances, and it also made my surgeon push off my surgery until middle of May.  I found a Surgeon in San Fran that works almost exclusively with high level skiers, and he said that the Ortho was "dumb as **it"  

 

So take everything with a grain of salt, and remember that what sounds good for the short run, may in the long run be very bad for you.

 

The hop test is one test, but put your knee in a situation on the mountain that is in an uncontrolled environment, and let it twist from a fall or quick turn, and then determine if your knee will give out.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

Went to orthopedic surgeon for MRI results:

 

Bad News: High grade (complete) ACL tear.
Good News: No breaks. Meniscus, Cartilage, and other ligaments intact. Good ROM, minimal pain, minimal swelling, no giving out, full weight-bearing. Slight limp.

Physical therapy 2-3 times per week for 4-6 weeks and then reassess stability and try some real activity to see how the knee behaves. If it gives out during that time, then definitely will have surgery. The ortho doesn't think it is necessary to wait to try aggressive activity until fall. I might even get to try to ski. We decided I'd rather just lose one ski season instead of two. :)

 

Been reading a lot on who are the best candidates for the non-surgical approach. So far, I'm a candidate. The big positive is no other tears--especially the meniscus. The other is that I haven't had any other periods of instability (my knee hasn't "given out" except for the initial injury.) There are several "hop tests" that I will do with the physical therapist during rehab and those seem to be one of the best predictors for success without surgery. Quad strength and knee laxity really don't seem to predict success or failure. Just hope I was born with the "right" body structure to try the non-surgical route.

 

What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities.

post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by roverdisco View Post


I am a coper (41 years old).  Full ACL tear with level 2 LCL strain and bone bruise on Dec. 10, 2011.  Tried to ski out of a fall, phantom foot and then pop.  No damage to meniscus and minimal swelling.  My knee fooled two doctors who thought it was a meniscus tear due to the stability.  MRI told the truth. Met with a good Ortho who handles all knee injuries for University of Wisconsin football team and teaches at UW (and is an avid skier).  Did PT and the last day was doing cuts and single leg long jumps.  They both recommended to go the non-surgecial rout and wear a brace (I know there is differing opinions with the brace).  I only missed 3 weeks last year and am at 35+ days this year.  The OS actually used me as an example for his residents.  He had each of them check my injured knee first and they all looked puzzled.  He then had them compare it to the good knee and they then saw the difference.  My bad knee movement was 4.4mm and my good knee was 0.  This is why the other two docs I saw missed it.  Had they checked just the injured knee, they very likely would have misdiagnosed as well.  I lift weights for exercise and the PT felt strong hamstrings are good compensators for an ALC deficient knee (I love dead lifts).

 

I fully agree with your statement "What I've determined so far is that it is a lot easier to tell if you actually need surgery than to tell if you might be someone that can get by without it and return to your previous activities."  I still questions if I shouldn't just get it done but I have never had a stability issue and am skiing better than I ever have.  The mental healing was the hardest (i.e. if I do this, what would happen to my knee).  The best thing I did was get a lesson from a PSIA level III instructor who had been there done that.  I had changed my skiing last year to compensate for the injury and needed to unlearn bad habits.  This helped my confidence and cleared my head some as well.

 

Good luck!

 

You got injured on Dec 10, 2011. I'm not sure if you are saying that you got to ski at the end of January in the 2011-2012 season? Since Colorado has skiing until May or later at Arapahoe Basin (and I have a totally unused EPIC pass), I'm hoping that I get a chance to test my knee out.

 

As much as I have an unnatural attraction to moguls, I may just have to make a conscious decision that I can't ski them. (There's that little voice in my head that just calls me to them and got me in trouble this year.) However, I won't be one that will be happy on the blue groomers all day either. I was a competitive mogul skier and racer for over a dozen years back east. I was so used to skiing icy moguls--the real kind with blue ice. Ironically, that makes for a really shitty powder skier (too much carving and I was on slalom skis). Now I would be happy with becoming a good powder skier, but you usually have to go through a bunch of crud to get to the powder.

 

When I looked at a few 10-year retrospective studies, a lot of people tear their meniscus later on--whether they have surgery or not. And you're about twice as likely to tear it if you don't have ACLr. I need to get the whole studies to identify the population. Many go for a few years without ACLr, but decide to have surgery at a later date. Whether people get osteoarthritis later in life without getting ACLr is up for debate. Old school theory was everyone--the general population--got some degree of osteoarthritis later in life as part of the natural aging process. That is just not true. I have a back with a lot of degenerative disc disease, but my knees don't show any arthritis. I thought with the back, I might have a genetic predisposition to OA, but now I don't think so. Competing all of those years, overweight, and 45 years old, I would have thought I would have seen more issues in my knees. I just don't know if it would be going without surgery or just postponing it if I don't want to do surgery now.

 

As MarzNC said, There here is no downside to doing PT for a couple months before making a decision about surgery.

 

Previous to the injury, I was making my plans to get out of the all work no play mode. I was planning on buying the EPIC local pass in late-March or April when the prices were the lowest. With the traffic to the mountains here and my distance from the ski areas, the best way to ski is to head up Friday night. So I want to join the Schussbaumer Ski Club--they have a member's only chalet (kind of dormitory style) at Breckenridge which has a membership process to get in. $549 for an EPIC local pass and another $500 for the chalet dues sure makes for an unlimited amount of fun and meeting new people that share common interests. Now everything is up in the air.

post #44 of 55

Back when I was skiing without an ACL there was only one very specific loading pattern that made it give out.  If I didn't do that, it was fine.  Unfortunately, I would sometimes react (avoid a rock) or forget (load the tails to exaggerate powder spray) and out it went.

post #45 of 55

I made sure I stuck with formal PT until I was cleared to do agility drills.  That was about 4 months after popping off the ACL.  I spaced out the last few PT sessions to once a week or once every two weeks after I was good for day-to-day activities.  The idea was to get a reality check and to learn new exercises for the next stage.  What was really good in my case was that I did not have any swelling after Month 2 or so, not even after a PT session.  I started working with a personal trainer around Month 3, not so much for the bad knee but for general ski conditioning.

 

I was conservative in some ways, but not completely.  I used crutches the first few weeks until my balance was decent, then a cane when going out in order to avoid limping.  Went on short hikes in the Adirondacks at Week 10, with a walking stick along for going downhill.  ROM was about 135 then (good knee was 147).  Started indoor rock climbing at Month 4, but only on belay.  Still not jumping down from very high when bouldering.

 

From my research, getting back on skis before reaching the rehab stage for quick motion exercises (agility, jumping) is asking for trouble.  Too many variables over which there is little control.  The potential for messing up the meniscus is not worth it IMHO.

 

This was one of the good sources I found about meniscus issues:

 

http://www.stoneclinic.com/meniscus-tear

post #46 of 55

I'm without pain and swelling now only 11 days after. I forgot about my leg today and got out of the car with full weight on it instead of being cautious and making sure I got up on both legs at once. It just felt a little stiff. A few days after the injury, I was off crutches. When he saw me at 1 week he thought it had been 3 weeks. Everyone's injury is different and their bodies react differently. Medicine is as much art as it is science.

 

I'm not going to rush anything. I don't want to try to save this ski season, but I would like to test the knee out in a few months. When a ski season can last through June here and you get hurt on Feb 3 and actually get a chance to try to ski. I'm not going to go out and do bumps or anything crazy, but I think I will just know at that point whether I need surgery. If I do ski, it will be a more controlled environment. First, I won't be skiing alone. Second, I won't be skiing anywhere that I have to get on another lift to get to the base.  

 

It comes down between the answers to the following questions for me:

1) To ski or not to ski? Why else would I be on this board?

2) Am I delaying the inevitable knee surgery since I will have a higher probability of tearing my meniscus and other ligaments down the road? Could I be heading towards osteoarthritis or a total knee replacement? Life won't be perfect with an ACLr, but it's not going to be perfect without it either.

3) Isn't having surgery after physical therapy and conditioning putting me in the best spot for a successful ACL reconstruction since I have no other damage in that knee? I do get 26 PT visits per year with my medical insurance and that number resets on 10/1.

 

One of my master's degrees is in Biomechanics and I have an athletic training background, so that helps with the rehab aspects. But since I'm a numbers gal, I want to see the research (not just abstracts) and do my own math to form my own conclusions. But there is no black and white here. MarzNC will tell you that there's a difference between statistical signficance and clinical significance. I just need to find a way to put all of this out of my head and just focus on staying healthy and rehabbing the knee.

 

I feel like my life rotates around my left knee right now. You set a clock on your computer for once an hour and do your thing including 5 minutes of bike or treadmill. I'm glad I have a three-day weekend to work out and try my own plan. The recumbent bike is in my bedroom and the TotalGym is in the basement. There is an unused treadmill at my parent's house that will definitely be over here if I have surgery. My one piece of dream equipment would be an endless pool.

 

post #47 of 55

Part of the question is how well you can do the maintenance over the years.  There are high level skiers who have been on a torn ACL for many years, but they are highly skilled and highly conditioned.  If a few years down the road you have a bad year where you don't have time or lose motivation for conditioning, I suspect that is when you would be likely to wreck your miniscus.

 

I believe that part of my injury was slow accumulation, but a lot was also because of job-stress-related weight gain and exercise procrastination.

 

(In fact, knowing myself, I'm worried about the year after next.  I'm sure PT and fighting back to skiing will make next year one of my most fit ever.  But the one after that is a real backsliding risk.)

post #48 of 55
Do the PT & work hard!
Inspiration for you-


Best of luck!



Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

I'm without pain and swelling now only 11 days after. I forgot about my leg today and got out of the car with full weight on it instead of being cautious and making sure I got up on both legs at once. It just felt a little stiff. A few days after the injury, I was off crutches. When he saw me at 1 week he thought it had been 3 weeks. Everyone's injury is different and their bodies react differently. Medicine is as much art as it is science.

I'm not going to rush anything. I don't want to try to save this ski season, but I would like to test the knee out in a few months. When a ski season can last through June here and you get hurt on Feb 3 and actually get a chance to try to ski. I'm not going to go out and do bumps or anything crazy, but I think I will just know at that point whether I need surgery. If I do ski, it will be a more controlled environment. First, I won't be skiing alone. Second, I won't be skiing anywhere that I have to get on another lift to get to the base.  

It comes down between the answers to the following questions for me:
1) To ski or not to ski? Why else would I be on this board?
2) Am I delaying the inevitable knee surgery since I will have a higher probability of tearing my meniscus and other ligaments down the road? Could I be heading towards osteoarthritis or a total knee replacement? Life won't be perfect with an ACLr, but it's not going to be perfect without it either.
3) Isn't having surgery after physical therapy and conditioning putting me in the best spot for a successful ACL reconstruction since I have no other damage in that knee? I do get 26 PT visits per year with my medical insurance and that number resets on 10/1.

One of my master's degrees is in Biomechanics and I have an athletic training background, so that helps with the rehab aspects. But since I'm a numbers gal, I want to see the research (not just abstracts) and do my own math to form my own conclusions. But there is no black and white here. MarzNC will tell you that there's a difference between statistical signficance and clinical significance. I just need to find a way to put all of this out of my head and just focus on staying healthy and rehabbing the knee.

I feel like my life rotates around my left knee right now. You set a clock on your computer for once an hour and do your thing including 5 minutes of bike or treadmill. I'm glad I have a three-day weekend to work out and try my own plan. The recumbent bike is in my bedroom and the TotalGym is in the basement. There is an unused treadmill at my parent's house that will definitely be over here if I have surgery. My one piece of dream equipment would be an endless pool.


post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by roverdisco View Post
 

Tore my ACL 12/10/11 (been skiing for 27 years and this was my first major injury).  Was down over the holidays.  Came back with a vengeance with exercise and PT.  Met with the OS yesterday for the first time and nothing else was injured other than the ACL (full tear).  Good stability and ROM in the "bad" knee.  He wants me to push the knee for 6 weeks to see how it holds up to my normal activities, including skiing (with a brace) so I am sort of back in the game.  Though your season may be done, focus on the surgery and more so on the re-hab and come back strong next season.  Misery may love company but it hates optimists and hard workers.  Don't make misery your friend.


How were you at time of knee reco ? Did you have any meniscus damage ?

I am having this surgery in 2 days time. I am 43 and pretty scared.

post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by fabienzan View Post
 


How were you at time of knee reco ? Did you have any meniscus damage ?

I am having this surgery in 2 days time. I am 43 and pretty scared.

 

Hello there, fabienzan.  It's not the freshest of threads, but maybe that's a good thing.  

 

I can't answer for roverdisco, but my wife had an ACL surgery (no meniscus damage), and although it wasn't a walk in the park, it sorted itself out.  Work hard at PT, make sure you listen to, and write down, what they tell you, and ask a lot of questions.  If you can, take somebody with you to the first meeting with the PT specialist, and have that person take notes.  You'll be working on strength and flexibility (don't miss the flexibility part). 

 

Her surgery was done well.  If she'd had it to do over, she wouldn't have opted to sleep through it -- she felt groggy for months afterward.  She was a bit older than you, though, and she has eccentric reactions to some drugs (dilaudid, e.g., which wakes her right up), so the grogginess might have been an individual issue.  

 

Good luck with all of it.  Most people who've had the surgery say they're happy they did it -- my wife is.

post #51 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fabienzan View Post
 


How were you at time of knee reco ? Did you have any meniscus damage ?

I am having this surgery in 2 days time. I am 43 and pretty scared.

 

 

No, I didn't have any meniscus damage.

 

You don't need to be scared. It's pretty painful after surgery, but if you've torn your ACL, you're familiar with knee pain.

 

My advice is to take "range of motion" very seriously. I had a very hard time getting my knee straight after the surgery…and as months went by, it got more and more difficult. And that made everything else difficult. Strength will come naturally, but range of motion is something that needs to be worked at.

 

I'm glad I did it as well. I go skiing, play tennis, whatever…I never even think about my knee.

 

You'll probably have "why the hell did I do this" moments (I did)…but just keep pushing, take PT seriously, and it will all be over before you know it.

 

Best of luck.

post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghetto3jon View Post
 

 

 

No, I didn't have any meniscus damage.

 

You don't need to be scared. It's pretty painful after surgery, but if you've torn your ACL, you're familiar with knee pain.

 

My advice is to take "range of motion" very seriously. I had a very hard time getting my knee straight after the surgery…and as months went by, it got more and more difficult. And that made everything else difficult. Strength will come naturally, but range of motion is something that needs to be worked at.

 

I'm glad I did it as well. I go skiing, play tennis, whatever…I never even think about my knee.

 

You'll probably have "why the hell did I do this" moments (I did)…but just keep pushing, take PT seriously, and it will all be over before you know it.

 

Best of luck.


 

Thanks for your feedback. I wish I was in your situation with no meniscus damage. I can deal with the operation and rehab but in my case the meniscus is what is killing me as my knee is quiet stable at the moment but I am doing the knee reco mainly to protect further injuries to the meniscus in the future (not knowing how much will be trimmed during the operation).

 

All long term studies are very positive for people with only ACL tear but pretty negative when the meniscus is damaged. In my case both meniscus might need to be trimmed

post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 

 

Hello there, fabienzan.  It's not the freshest of threads, but maybe that's a good thing.  

 

I can't answer for roverdisco, but my wife had an ACL surgery (no meniscus damage), and although it wasn't a walk in the park, it sorted itself out.  Work hard at PT, make sure you listen to, and write down, what they tell you, and ask a lot of questions.  If you can, take somebody with you to the first meeting with the PT specialist, and have that person take notes.  You'll be working on strength and flexibility (don't miss the flexibility part). 

 

Her surgery was done well.  If she'd had it to do over, she wouldn't have opted to sleep through it -- she felt groggy for months afterward.  She was a bit older than you, though, and she has eccentric reactions to some drugs (dilaudid, e.g., which wakes her right up), so the grogginess might have been an individual issue.  

 

Good luck with all of it.  Most people who've had the surgery say they're happy they did it -- my wife is.

 

Hi Lakespapa,

 

Thanks for your reply. I agree most people with only ACL tear who go through the knee reco do very well as long as they are fully committed to the rehab after that. It seems to be very different when you have other issues like meniscus one as then things get more complicated. If young then it is a bad injury to get but the meniscus is normally sutured and then preserved for the long run but if you are past 40 and have meniscus issues then will trim them and that is where a lot of issue come from (OA is a major one at 7 - 10 years mark).

 

I am actually confident that it will be hard but I will come through it with a stronger knee but I won't be able to stop the progression of OA related to my meniscus tears which why I am posting on here to see how people who had the same injury as me in their 40s are doing in their 50s - 60s (pain , ROM limitation and so on or even knee replacement).

 

Cheers

Fabien

post #54 of 55

You are posting this on at least one other site too.......

post #55 of 55
Fabien, based on the pattern of your posts, I really think you're letting fear get the better of you. Did you know that one of the most important factors in recovering from illness or injury is the affected person's attitude? If nothing else, fear makes our bodies produce adrenaline and stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline which wear down the immune system and the ability of the body to repair itself.

I totally sympathize with your urge to get more information and find someone who will tell you what the right course of action is. As someone who has spent more than her share of time on the Web trying to figure out how to deal with an injury or illness, I think it's critical to know what's going on with your body so you can make informed decisions. However, at some point you need to settle down, prepare yourself for the next step, and do everything you can to make the outcome as positive as is humanly possible.

One thing I want to point out: in the first post of yours that I read you said that your doctor had given you a very good prognosis but that "of course" he was lying. This makes me think that you need to talk with your doctor about communication, let him know that you want to know the whole story, and most importantly tell him how worried you are about how the injury will affect your future. You aren't likely to have easy access to that level of expertise in the future (unless you have an outstanding physical therapist), so try to establish some trust with him.

Best of luck, and I hope things settle down for you.
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