EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › case hardened nicks on edges, should they be removed?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

case hardened nicks on edges, should they be removed?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I *think* when you hit a rock with your edge, the nick it creates is called case hardned ? Regardless, when I'm sharpening my edges with my diamond stones, there are spots that still have a "depression" on the edge where the rock hit it. Seems obvious that in order to remover that I would have to file more meat off. But do you need to do that or is it ok to leave a few of these rounded off edge nicks on the edges ?

post #2 of 12

Actually, you get the case-hardened spots out with your stones. The file will just skip over them.

post #3 of 12
I don't, if I remove them every time there is one I'd have no edge left.

It's called work harden by the way, case harden is when you infusing carbon atom into surface of a low carbon steel.
post #4 of 12

You need to remove them.

The nicks can be harder than your file, so they will damage the file.  They can even tear up a diamond stone if you are not careful.  You can also get a fairly long section of hardened edge that a file will not cut.  I take the nicks down free hand with a coarse stone, and the long hard sections with a black diamond stone in the same guide I use with the file.  

 

BK

 

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by my poor knees View Post

I *think* when you hit a rock with your edge, the nick it creates is called case hardned ? Regardless, when I'm sharpening my edges with my diamond stones, there are spots that still have a "depression" on the edge where the rock hit it. Seems obvious that in order to remover that I would have to file more meat off. But do you need to do that or is it ok to leave a few of these rounded off edge nicks on the edges ?


Generally nicks/slight depressions are OK and a fact of life. As you say, it'll take too much material removal to flush out the edges. Burrs need to be removed however.

 

Interesting note regarding work vs case hardened edges. I've been under the impression they were interchangeable terms.

 

 

post #6 of 12


I had been under the same impression.  However, a quick check of wikipedia shows that jz is right.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


Generally nicks/slight depressions are OK and a fact of life. As you say, it'll take too much material removal to flush out the edges. Burrs need to be removed however.

 

Interesting note regarding work vs case hardened edges. I've been under the impression they were interchangeable terms.

 

 



 

post #7 of 12
Leave them, removing them will only shorten the life of your edges. At some point you will need to file it down, bit I wouldn't be worried about it till it effects performance. Just sharpen as normal and take off the case hardened burrs with a stone cause you can rip out stones from your diamond file.
post #8 of 12

I usually recommend using a cheap 'utility' aluminum oxide stone for initial deburring and work hardened sections to prolong the life of your diamonds or nicer stones.

post #9 of 12
From my experience of sharpening other stuff, if you gouge up your diamond stone you are using too much pressure, lightly pass the stone a few times to remove the burr first or it'll dig into your stone.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Leave them, removing them will only shorten the life of your edges.

I ski in the East, and I sharpen my skis several times a season, but I've never seen a ski edge that was filed all the way through.  Ski lose their edge grip long before that happens, probably because of some loss of torsional stiffness or something.

If I lived in Alberta, I'd throw my files away.

 

BK

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post

Quote: Originally Posted by huhh Leave them, removing them will only shorten the life of your edges. I ski in the East, and I sharpen my skis several times a season, but I've never seen a ski edge that was filed all the way through. Ski lose their edge grip long before that happens, probably because of some loss of torsional stiffness or something. If I lived in Alberta, I'd throw my files away. BK

I sharpen my edges after every day, depending on how chewed up they are, 200 or 400 grit moonflex, takes 2min. By the time my edges are bad enough to warrant me taking out the file I need a base grind anyways. Considering you use on the whole effective edge of the ski, a few minor non sharp spots on your edge would make a difference, just keep the whole edge sharp and clean. It's like nit picking over a few small scratches in the base, waste of time to worry about it till it causes a loss of performance.

I have a pair of 2005 carving skis that have been sharpens to death, yet still have surprising amount of edge left.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

thanks for confirming, I seem to hit lots of rocks so if I had to file out all the dents on the edges I would probablty run out of metal real quick, wanted to make sure I wasn't making a mistake.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › case hardened nicks on edges, should they be removed?