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Should I get a softer tongue for my Full Tilt Originals?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

So I have been skiing on my new Full Tilt Original boots.  They come with interchangeable tongues, which changes the flex rating of the boot.  The boot comes with a tongue that has a flex rating of 6.  I have found it challenging to keep pressure on the front of boots while skiing.

 

Full Tilt also sells a boot with a flex rating of 4, so it would be easier to flex.  If I look online, people tend to say this tongue would be best suited for people who are spending time doing tricks.

 

I am not in the best shape, and my left leg that is weaker than the right.  Does it make sense for me to buy this other tongue?  Are there any disadvantages to more flex?  What are they?

 

Thanks!

Matt

post #2 of 14

Being able to keep pressure on the front of your boots is not necessarily the same as being able to flex the boot.  Technique could be the problem.  If you ski even slightly in the backseat you will have a lot of trouble feeling the front of your boots.  How is the range of motion in your ankles?  Rather than worrying about keeping pressure on the front of your boots, concentrate on feeling the balls of your feet and keeping weight on them.  Try that and see if you can feel the balls of your feet.  If you can't feel the balls of your feet, a softer tongue will not fix that.  Up until last year I didn't even know I couldn't flex my Tecnica boots properly.  It took a PSIA level 3 instructor to tell me that and it was later confirmed by a PSIA examiner.  I now have Dalbello Krypton Cross boots that I can flex just fine.  Have you skied with someone who can actually see if your boot is flexing or not?  If you haven't I would suggest you do that also.  

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post

I have found it challenging to keep pressure on the front of boots while skiing.

 


^^^^ What he said. Do you mean "keep pressure on the front of the skis?" If you're pressuring the boot but it isn't getting transmitted to the ski, then too stiff.

 

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
...  Rather than worrying about keeping pressure on the front of your boots, concentrate on feeling the balls of your feet and keeping weight on them.  Try that and see if you can feel the balls of your feet.  If you can't feel the balls of your feet, a softer tongue will not fix that.


I don't like the advice regarding the balls of the feet.  Are you saying to pressure the balls of the feet?  I have found this to be a flawed way to ski.  Pressure should be on the whole foot.

 

I do agree that it is not good to keep pressure on the tongue.  Pressure the tongue when you need it.

 

I am not an instructor, so my advice may be completely off.  But these are adjustments that I have found to work for me, through the help of others.

 

The feel of the tongue being too stiff could be a leverage issue.  If you have a softer tongue, try it.  Sometimes a tongue pad placed low but above the ankle will help with leverage.  Otherwise, go to a fitter.

 

post #5 of 14

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post


I don't like the advice regarding the balls of the feet.  Are you saying to pressure the balls of the feet.  I have found this to be a flawed way to ski.  Pressure should be on the whole foot.

 


That advice came from a PSIA examiner who is probably the best skier I've ever been around.  

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post


I don't like the advice regarding the balls of the feet.  Are you saying to pressure the balls of the feet?  I have found this to be a flawed way to ski.  Pressure should be on the whole foot.



Move your center of gravity forward if there is pressure on the whole foot.  You want to balance on the balls of feet.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hey all!

Thanks for the replies.  Last time I went up skiing, I took a lesson.  The instructor examined my ski posture, and while he was watching he told me that I was definitely able to flex my boots.  The trouble I run into is that I find that flexing the boot to be tiring and an unfamiliar position/movement, especially after I've been skiing for a while.  I thought the tongue might make this easier?  Or should I just try to get used to this tongue?

 

I like the idea of balancing on the balls of the foot.  The instructor I had suggested I try to lift my toes up while I'm skiing, which thereby makes the ankle flex...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Being able to keep pressure on the front of your boots is not necessarily the same as being able to flex the boot.  Technique could be the problem.  If you ski even slightly in the backseat you will have a lot of trouble feeling the front of your boots.  How is the range of motion in your ankles?  Rather than worrying about keeping pressure on the front of your boots, concentrate on feeling the balls of your feet and keeping weight on them.  Try that and see if you can feel the balls of your feet.  If you can't feel the balls of your feet, a softer tongue will not fix that.  Up until last year I didn't even know I couldn't flex my Tecnica boots properly.  It took a PSIA level 3 instructor to tell me that and it was later confirmed by a PSIA examiner.  I now have Dalbello Krypton Cross boots that I can flex just fine.  Have you skied with someone who can actually see if your boot is flexing or not?  If you haven't I would suggest you do that also.  



 

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post


I like the idea of balancing on the balls of the foot.  The instructor I had suggested I try to lift my toes up while I'm skiing, which thereby makes the ankle flex...
 



 


If you are able to lift the foot up to flex the ankle then you would not be on the balls of the feet.  In a neutral position you can go either way quickly.  You also should be neutral in the cuff and add pressure when you need it.  Centered is where it's at.

 

Again, I am not an instructor so this is just my opinion.

 

post #9 of 14

As long as you can flex the boot I don't think you should get a softer tongue.  Think about good athletes in virtually any sport and you won't find them standing flat-footed.  They have their knees and ankles slightly bent, and their weight is forward.  Imagine Raphael Nadal trying to play tennis flat-footed.

post #10 of 14

My instructor also says balance on the balls of your feet like in any other athletic maneuver but the main point is it's not an equipment issue it's a technique issue. Spend the money on lessons. The 6 is the average flex that many people find too soft. Unless you are very light or very weak I doubt if going softer would solve the problem.

post #11 of 14

It might not be a softer tongue you need but a bit more default forward lean. Depending on how your body is and the boot and binding setup this could involve heel lift, toe lift, increasing or decreasing binding delta, or altering the angle of the cuff.

post #12 of 14

My opinion on the Full Tilt (Raichle/Kneisel Flexon) is they hamper skiing. Back in the late 80s and early 90s when the boots were used to win World Cup races, the boots were so heavily modified wit fibreglass and metal. Hinge placement is not optimal for ankle flexion, and rearward and lateral stiffness is marginal with only light weight touring boots being softer.

 

 

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post


I am not in the best shape, and my left leg that is weaker than the right.



Others may have thought about it, but I am going to say it.  Get in better shape.

post #14 of 14

Fwiw : my free ski boot is a Seth / #8 tongue.  Those are great for playing on fatter skis as the old design is low to the ground & pivots easy.  This is not a race boot!  Don't try to make it one!  

 

Take a look at my review in the members section, 2 things I needed to get this  boot to engage & ski were a booster strap & use of the big forward lean shim!

 

Once this dialed my stance, the were perfect for all but race stock skis.  Take a look at the pics on the thread.

 

 

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