EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › No, I don't want your "clean" fixie project for $500
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No, I don't want your "clean" fixie project for $500

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

I also don't want your unfinished fixie project for $450  , and no, I don't want to pay $250 for your Japanese gas pipe frame to convert into a fixie.

 

No, I don't want your "freshly tuned" rusted out Bennotto for $300, and I don't want your 1970s Ross Signature for $350.   I want your Walmart-special MTBs even less.

 

Has the used road bike market completely collapsed?  

 

  I see some Scott Speedsters now and then, a Cannondale or two, but it seems more worthwhile to simply buy new than to bother looking at either C-list or Fleabay.

 

Tell me I'm wrong?

 

 

post #2 of 17

You are wrong...

 

I procured this lovely 1988 Alpine custom road fixed gear last spring. Full Suntour Superbe Pro track kit.

 

87 Alpine 02.jpg

post #3 of 17

... does that bike have two brake levers but only one brake? :)


Edited by rachelv - 1/24/12 at 5:54pm
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelv View Post

... does that bike have two brake levers but only one brake? :)



rachelv....yes

 

Most road going fixed gear bikes use only a front brake as it does most of the work and you can supply some braking force to the rear wheel through the cranks.

The reason for the second lever is simply to give you a comfortable "ride the hoods" position. Some remove the pivoted lever from the base but i think it looks weird that way.

 

If you ride a single speed then two brakes would be proper

 

post #5 of 17


Hah.  

 

Alpines were a dime a dozen around here even 5 years ago, esp. the JP-built ones without the crest.    I found a cherry Maryland-built one in a Boy Scout yard sale for $25 ....in 2007.    With long cage rear derailleur and almost completely unused climbing sprockets.

post #6 of 17

Dude. You put the single brake in the middle and get bullhorns, or just use two brakes. Come on. :)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



rachelv....yes

 

Most road going fixed gear bikes use only a front brake as it does most of the work and you can supply some braking force to the rear wheel through the cranks.

The reason for the second lever is simply to give you a comfortable "ride the hoods" position. Some remove the pivoted lever from the base but i think it looks weird that way.

 

If you ride a single speed then two brakes would be proper

 



 

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Hah.  

 

Alpines were a dime a dozen around here even 5 years ago, esp. the JP-built ones without the crest.    I found a cherry Maryland-built one in a Boy Scout yard sale for $25 ....in 2007.    With long cage rear derailleur and almost completely unused climbing sprockets.



This is a Fred Kelly built example....when in Rockvill, MD

 

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelv View Post

Dude. You put the single brake in the middle and get bullhorns, or just use two brakes. Come on. :)
 



You crazy kids....no sense of tradition  rolleyes.gif

post #9 of 17

I'll never understand the fixie fad.

post #10 of 17

Back to the OP........ there is a part at the dump near my beachhouse that is referred to as Huffy Heaven.... i.e. place where all crap unworthy to be called a bike goes to be recycled before dying ......

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Braquage View Post

I'll never understand the fixie fad.

 

Fixies have been in constant use since the beginning of cycling as we know it.....fad?

post #12 of 17

A hipster fad....... since the developemnt of brakes and gears, the only place for a fixie is on the track.

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post

A hipster fad....... since the developemnt of brakes and gears, the only place for a fixie is on the track.

 


Uh oh, someone's got a different opinion than me on the internet.  Have you ever ridden one?  Not just tried it in the parking lot, or for a day or two, but really committed to it for awhile?

 

IMHO after fifteen months of riding a fixed gear road bike for a 27 mile r/t commute around twice a week, I've found at least a few benefits:

 

1) it makes a routine ride more interesting and more of a challenge;

2) simpler, easier maintenance;

3) the feeling of "direct connection" to the machine and the road is a pleasure  - pedal fast, go fast, pedal slow, go slow;

4) better bike control in wet or icey conditions from back pressure on pedals (yes I use brakes too but backpedalling adds control);

5) improved form at high RPM; and

6) improved climbing strength and tactics.

 

Both 5 and 6 directly improve my road bike performance - sprinting and climbing are not noticeably stronger.

 

No doubt it IS a hipster fad, but take away the skinny jeans and stupid fedoras, and fixed gear still would serve some riders well.  Not others - YMMV, as with most things.   But it's not just a pointless fashion statement.

 

And to bring this back to the OP's point, the hipster / retro fad has certainly mucked up the market for old bikes and there's a lot of delusional sellers AND buyers.  Considering cheap functional new bikes on bikesdirect.com; reasonably priced retail stuff from Surly, Salsa, Kona, or whatever you like; and the cost of parts and time to upgrade old stuff, and yup, new makes sense.   Don't tell my wife but when I converted a beloved old road bike into a fixed gear, it cost at least $700 - new wheels (swapped 27" to 700c, for clearance and to enter the 21st century), new brakes (wheel swap required longer reach), chain, crankset, fenders, winter tires, summer tires, and a rack.  Happened to be a frame I've owned for 30 years that fits perfectly and rides like a dream so for me it made sense, but why do that with someone's project on craigslist?

post #14 of 17

When I sold my Raliegh Super Course II at a garage sale, everyone wanted to set it up SS or fixie. But what they really wanted was the original Brooks saddle. Someone got that, along with the bike, for $50.

post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

My Raleigh GP has been a fixie since 1989;  I've been through the fixie-induced slump in shifting skills and slump in descending skills more times than I can  count without looking through the logbooks. 

 

But that's not what this thread is about.    This thread is about everyone and their hipster auntie selling their incomplete fixie project on Craigslist, and pricing the incomplete project at finished-bike prices.      As if  stripping cables and derailers from a Schwinn Traveler somehow adds $400 to the $50 bike price.  

 

IOW, the title of this thread could be read as: "No, I don't want the heap of junk parts from your bins for $500.   The bike was worth more before you did anything at all to it.    The bike was rideable  by non-hipsters."

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post

A hipster fad....... since the developemnt of brakes and gears, the only place for a fixie is on the track.

A "proper" fixie has always worn a front brake. They are aka path racers. Made for road use, including geometry, BB height, wheelbase and a fork both made for and including a drilled crown for a brake. 

 

How 'bout TRACK bikes on the street are a hipster fad.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelv View Post

... does that bike have two brake levers but only one brake? :)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



rachelv....yes

 

Most road going fixed gear bikes use only a front brake as it does most of the work and you can supply some braking force to the rear wheel through the cranks.

The reason for the second lever is simply to give you a comfortable "ride the hoods" position. Some remove the pivoted lever from the base but i think it looks weird that way.

 

If you ride a single speed then two brakes would be proper

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelv View Post

Dude. You put the single brake in the middle and get bullhorns, or just use two brakes. Come on. :)
 



 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



You crazy kids....no sense of tradition  rolleyes.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

A "proper" fixie has always worn a front brake. They are aka path racers. Made for road use, including geometry, BB height, wheelbase and a fork both made for and including a drilled crown for a brake. 

 

How 'bout TRACK bikes on the street are a hipster fad.


Bicycle-Coaster-Brake-Hub-DC-HR-31-.jpg

 

^^^OH no he DEEEE hint!

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