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skis for the new england

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

I am lokking for new skis I am 40 years old and a level III skier I am 5' 6" 170 and ski primarly in Maine, Saddlback and SundayRiver.

I still like the bumps and spend alot of time in the trees. The rest of the time I lke to tear down The groomers ( New England Hardpack)

for those frome the west that means ice.  I have been looking at the volkl ac30 ac50 Or the rossi experience 83 or 88 I was leaning strong toward the volkl kendo as well.  The kendo, ac 50 and the 88 I am wondering if they me be alittle wide under foot.  The new volkl rtm which is replacing the the unlimted ac line has a full rocker and that also concerns me.  I thought about the weatea but they have a foam core and I don't like that to unstable.

post #2 of 20

Dynastar Outland 80 XT.

post #3 of 20

I went through the same decision process this year and ended up with the Line Prophet 90s.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/109128/one-ski-quiver-twin-tips-line-prophet-90s-length-binding-mount

 

If you spend more than 50% of your time on hardpack/ice you might also want to check out the Rossignol Avenger 82Ti's as well.  2 BILs have them and they absolutely love them for ripping down Jet and playing in the woods at Jay.

 

I wanted a slightly more off-piste/quicker turning ski so I went with the P90s.  The price was right too...

 

 

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 

Its nice to here from people who ski in new england.

I would like to here about whatever anybody knows about the rossi experience 88 or 83

I belong to NSP  so they are high on my interest list.

The dynastars, maybe I'm stuck in my ways but I, have never been a fan.  I have always liked volkl but with the ac30 ac 50 I thinking they might be to stiff and to heavy for the woods, but i don't know.  The kendos really interest me so I am interested in hearing more about them, and I'll check out the lines but I am not very famillar with the company.

post #5 of 20

Blizzard is Volkl done right. Bushwacker if trees are your higher priority, Magnum 8.7 if hardpack and crud. Otherwise, think highly of Kastle FX84 or Elan Apex for your mission. 

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by claydog View Post

I'll check out the lines but I am not very famillar with the company.


I had never heard of Line Ski's until a couple of years ago.  Interesting story... Jason Levinthal started the company after graduating from the University of Buffalo in parent's Albany, NY garage:

 

http://www.vermontguides.com/2003/4-apr/line_ski.htm
 

http://lineskis.com/our-story

 

K2 bought them 2006 along with Karhu so they are essentially a subsidiary of K2 now.  When I started looking... I had no intention of buying Line or Twin Tips for that matter.  I was just looking for the best single quiver all mountain ski for my ability and type of skiing.  I just bought them on word of mouth and after reading/watching a ton of reviews.  For the Northeast, I never thought that a couple of hours of demoing skis on a crowded weekend was adequate for evaluating a ski.... just too many variables.

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

bushwackers sound cool I can get them for 392,  I am sking atomic 11b5 in a 164

what do you think the 166 or the 159.  I skied in my teens and twenties on 195 volkl comp targa gs cut  straight skis and with the

new shape and shorter coming back I wonder if my pride is not allowing me to ski shorter, your thoughts.

when you say the blizards are the volkls done right can you elabrate.

 

 

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

cool background on the lines thanks for the history lesson

post #9 of 20

I really like the Kendo's for the east coast. They have great edge-hold and feel really light underfoot. I have not tried the bushwacker, but I know it doesn't have metal down the length of the ski which depending on what you are used to may be a good or bad thing

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by claydog View Post

bushwackers sound cool I can get them for 392,  I am sking atomic 11b5 in a 164

what do you think the 166 or the 159.  I skied in my teens and twenties on 195 volkl comp targa gs cut  straight skis and with the

new shape and shorter coming back I wonder if my pride is not allowing me to ski shorter, your thoughts.

when you say the blizards are the volkls done right can you elabrate.

 

 



get the 173cm it skis super easy.

 

 

post #11 of 20

The LP 90 is a sweet ski...def worth the consideration for the price...the other ski that seems to get a ton of props is the Blizzard 8.1...have yet to hear anyone say a negative thing about that ski for the east coast...my two cents...have skied both and enjoyed them....both hold a nice edge on eastern "hardpack"...8.1 more so than the LP...

post #12 of 20

Hi Claydog,

 

I grew up skiing Sunday River and Saddleback in the '60's and '70's.  Great hills.  I live in MA now, and am also an NSP member at Berkshire East.  I bought a pair of the Experience 98's this year and have found them to be a great ski for patrolling.  They will carve - perhaps not like race skis, but perfectly adequately.  I can ski bumps on them, they shmear, sideslip and snowplow at will and are very nimble and playful for the size.  Very intuitive - pretty much you think what you want them to do and they do it.  I don't have enough time in bumps and trees yet this year to comment on that a lot, except to say they have been fine in the bumps that I have done.  I ski bumps for fun, not for speed and they have not let me down. 

 

I'm 6'2", about 210#, and ski the 180cm mounted with look pivot bindings (14 DIN I think).  I bought the skis from Philpug who honored the pricing and predrilled them for the bindings for a very reasonable price. 

 

I haven't tried the other skis, and have been thinking of buying another ski for bumps, but so far don't know what would be a better bump ski and frankly am not sure I see the need.  I keep a pair of the kids old slalom skis around for those really icy days, but really the 98's seem to do pretty well on ice also. Not the scary experience that some people report on some wide skis.  So, I give them a thumbs up, but would recommend demoing any ski before you buy it.  One man's hero is another man's zero. 

post #13 of 20

Have you had the chance to use the Rossi Exp 98s in deeper stuff?  Sounds like they may be a great candidate for an all-around ski on east coast and trips out west, rather than using separate thin/fat skis for trips.  I understand there really isn't a 1-ski quiver, but I'm hearing great things about the 98s.....possibly an all-mountain killer.

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



get the 173cm it skis super easy.

 

 


^^^ This. 

 

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Have you had the chance to use the Rossi Exp 98s in deeper stuff?  Sounds like they may be a great candidate for an all-around ski on east coast and trips out west, rather than using separate thin/fat skis for trips.  I understand there really isn't a 1-ski quiver, but I'm hearing great things about the 98s.....possibly an all-mountain killer.



Well, for those of you here in the Northeast, you know that there haven't been any great opportunities to try it in deeper pow.  They certainly handle crud well - we have had plenty of that!  Hopefully sometime in February I'll have a chance to give some pow a try.  Right now, I agree with your assessment.  I'll post again when I have a chance to try them in powder.  But, you have to remember - I don't demo a lot of skis, so there may very well be something better out there.  But I'm very happy with the ski.

 

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the insight, everyone keeps telling me skinner is better in the trees for maneuverability.  That's why I was thinking 88 or 83 have not been able to find them for a demo.

I can't find the kendos either but still looking.  would it be safe to say that the experience line is similar to the volkle unlimited, or the new RTM line

post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by xcskier61 View Post

Hi Claydog,

 

I grew up skiing Sunday River and Saddleback in the '60's and '70's.  Great hills.  I live in MA now, and am also an NSP member at Berkshire East.  I bought a pair of the Experience ern thing and a east coast wannabe thing I had my mind set on tering to buy the se old 11b5   98's this year and have found them to be a great ski for patrolling.  They will carve - perhaps not like race skis, but perfectly adequately.  I can ski bumps on them, they shmear, sideslip and snowplow at will and are very nimble and playful for the size.  Very intuitive - pretty much you think what you want them to do and they do it.  I don't have enough time in bumps and trees yet this year to comment on that a lot, except to say they have been fine in the bumps that I have done.  I ski bumps for fun, not for speed and they have not let me down. 

 

I'm 6'2", about 210#, and ski the 180cm mounted with look pivot bindings (14 DIN I think).  I bought the skis from Philpug who honored the pricing and predrilled them for the bindings for a very reasonable price. 

 

I haven't tried the other skis, and have been thinking of buying another ski for bumps, but so far don't know what would be a better bump ski and frankly am not sure I see the need.  I keep a pair of the kids old slalom skis around for those really icy days, but really the 98's seem to do pretty well on ice also. Not the scary experience that some people report on some wide ski4s.  So, I give them a thumbs up, but would recommend demoing any ski before you buy it.  One man's hero is another man's zero. 



xcskier61  I have not had a chance to do any demos And I will not buy a pair of skies without riding them but I will diffintley give the 98s a shot. the width has scared me, it seems to be a western thing and a eastcoast wannabe thing. I was 18 once  and remember reading powder and ski and they never talked about maine only the west and their hero snow they aleways had.

i was hoping to buy my friends 11b5 off him.  which will carve on ice and blow through bumps like a bull dozer but they are unforgiving and stiff in the woods so i was going to go to a 88 rossi exper or the kendo for a fun ski and use the atomics for work. but i am having trouble locating them for a demo so I may try the mantra and the rossi 98 exper.  it is resureing to here you  patroll and understand the skills needed for the job. I will  let you know how it goes and would  apprietiate any other insight on the matter.

 

post #18 of 20

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dynastar-6th-Sense-Distorter-173cm-09-10-Skis-w-NX-12-Wide-/190633563124?pt=Skiing&hash=item2c62a553f4#ht_3366wt_1037

 

 

These look like a great deal, probably very similar to the Sultan 85.  I have done business with them before and they are great. Oh and Free Shipping!

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by claydog View Post

Thanks for the insight, everyone keeps telling me skinner is better in the trees for maneuverability.  That's why I was thinking 88 or 83 have not been able to find them for a demo.

I can't find the kendos either but still looking.  would it be safe to say that the experience line is similar to the volkle unlimited, or the new RTM line


This is not true. Repeat, not true. Skinny in trees (if the snow is soft, why else would you be in the trees) will introduce you to all sort of interesting objects like roots, stumps, rocks, and snarls. They in turn will introduce you either to serious porpoising (nothing wrong with that, although it gets tiring in settled heavy snow) or the ER. You need float. IMO a 87-94 is minimum width for NE trees. In any new snow, 98 and up. And you will not find a more maneuverable ski < 80 mm in tight places than the Bushwacker. It's super light, poppy, has a serious sidecut. 

 

Now notice that very tight bumps, if you zipper them, may reward a narrow ski. Different story. (Although I have seen some strong skiers on Bushwackers doing bumps crazy well.) Ah, priorities. 

 

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


This is not true. Repeat, not true. Skinny in trees (if the snow is soft, why else would you be in the trees) will introduce you to all sort of interesting objects like roots, stumps, rocks, and snarls. They in turn will introduce you either to serious porpoising (nothing wrong with that, although it gets tiring in settled heavy snow) or the ER. You need float. IMO a 87-94 is minimum width for NE trees. In any new snow, 98 and up. And you will not find a more maneuverable ski < 80 mm in tight places than the Bushwacker. It's super light, poppy, has a serious sidecut. 

 

Now notice that very tight bumps, if you zipper them, may reward a narrow ski. Different story. (Although I have seen some strong skiers on Bushwackers doing bumps crazy well.) Ah, priorities. 

 


I have to second what Beyond said. I was hesitant to try a wider ski but after demoing some bought a pair of Line Prophet 98s. I live and ski 30 minutes from Sunday River. For new snow in the trees, 98s are a blast. But I also have a hard snow skis for groomers. Sunday River has a great demo program, go try some out and see what you like.
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