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Review: DPS 112RP Hybrid & Pure

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Product:  DPS 112RP Hybrid

 

Length/size Tested: 190cm

Bindings: Marker Dukes with Dynaduke plates.

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Beaver Mt. UT

*Runs Taken: 2 days skiing all day.

*Snow Conditions: A couple of days during a big storm cycle. We have had almos no snow until this storm cycle. In fact I was fly fishing last weekend. It has been bad. So now the snow is dumping and the hill is tracked out in record time with a feed frenzy seldom seen at this sleepy mom and pop resort.

 

*Demo or Purchase: Purchase

 

Quiver:

184 Blizzard the One

178 Dynastar Sultan 85

 

Retired

185 Paxis Powder

185 Dynastar Huge Trouble

 

Summery (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):

 

This was touted as the versatile fun shape that can shred the powder, and rip up the rest of the resort once the pow is skied out. I didn't find it to be that exactly, but it is a rad powder ski.

 

Powder:  the RP112 is a superior directional powder ski with a few caveats.  It seems more tip floaty and skis better when driven from the cuff than a Praxis in deep snow.  I think it is even less demanding than the PP since you don’t have to try to keep centered on this ski, it floats automatically. 112RP does even better than the PP in funky wind affected snow.  

I dropped a few cliffs under 10’ and the ski really just felt good in the Air and made me confident to try something bigger. I think I will once we get another good storm.  I skied a bunch of conifer glades and some in the apsens as well. The tips on the 112RP do nto get hung up in the pucker brush as much as some other skis I own. So yea, they do very well in the trees. 

There are 2 drawbacks vis. The PP. The first is more of a feel thing. On the 112RP the slarvyness is muted and you need to ask it to slarve, it won’t just do it automatically. More stable less turny. And in very tight trees at higher speeds the 112RP is not quite as perfect as the Praxis, but it is close.

 

Crud: This was a wet snow day so the powder turned to crud pretty quickly and setup in some interesting ways. The ski felt good  for the most part. It is stiff enough for my skiing style and I certainly never felt the ski was about to fold up or whatever. It does well for hauling ass in crud when up on edge. However when running flat, the ski tends to ride up and over rather than punching through the heavy stuff. The 112RP gave me some really bad shin bang despite it being a powder day afternoon. I fought through it the first day but the second day, I gave up and swaped.

 

When skiing the 112RP and the One back to back I noticed a much more pleasurable skiing, greatly reduced shin bang, and not surprisingly more aggressive lines and  better skiing from myself when riding on The One.  I had never personally considered the one to be a great crud ski, and it has been maligned on this forum as not being a serious ski. But either I am selling it short or the 112RP is a very poor crud eater indeed. I think the minimal rocker profile on The One vis. The gigantor rockered tip on 112RP has a lot to do with it.

 

Groomers: This is probably the best 100mm+ powder oriented ski on groomers I have ever skied. Carves very nicely on soft powder day groomers.  It even does well on crusty old snow groomers.  I think this is where the resort in resort powder really comes into play.

 

Utility: Traverses/Skating/Sidestepping: This is where the Praxis Pow and other full reverse skis really suck. The stability is wack and there is no shock absorption on rutend traverses . And you cannot get any skating oomph on them for the flats. The minimal running length on the 112RP is much improved for the basic utility perspective.

 

Durability: I skied over a few rocks. I even landed on a rock on an 8’ huck, but I am seeing minimal base knicks and the edges are still perfect. Seems good to me.

 

Bottom line: The 112RP has replaced the Praxis Pow in my quiver. As a directional powder ski I think it really is all that. Sadly however the promise of a rad fun-shape powder ski that has enough resort performance to enjoy all day has been so far unfulfilled. I did long for a narrower ski in the afternoon both. Perhaps it is simply a result of the testing condition. We are just getting the fire hose turned on us and and the ski hill has gotten tracked out faster than ever as the powder starved locals went wild in a feeding frenzy seldom seen at Beaver Mt. The 112RP would almost certainly fare better in typical blower powder day.

 

I have the dynaduke plates and will swap in the dynafits once avy layers stabilize and I can get back to touring. These seem decently light for such a huge ski.

post #2 of 22

Interesting, as these are basically the two skis I have to choose from today -- 184 DPS 112 and 177 Blizzard Crush, so a tad smaller. We had 13" for yesterday, 1 or 2 of which fell during the morning. I loved the 112s in the crud, more so I think than the Blizzards. I think I might like the Blizzards a little more in untracked, so we're opposite.

 

I was planning to take out the Blizzards today, to compare, but I was really enjoying the others yesterday, not sure I want to switch. Complicating matters is that the mountain largely closed down right before noon, due to a widespread power outage, so while it was pretty skied out, it wasn't packed out yet. I guess I can switch at lunch. Skiing them back to back would be helpful.

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Interesting, as these are basically the two skis I have to choose from today -- 184 DPS 112 and 177 Blizzard Crush, so a tad smaller. We had 13" for yesterday, 1 or 2 of which fell during the morning. I loved the 112s in the crud, more so I think than the Blizzards. I think I might like the Blizzards a little more in untracked, so we're opposite.

 

I was planning to take out the Blizzards today, to compare, but I was really enjoying the others yesterday, not sure I want to switch. Complicating matters is that the mountain largely closed down right before noon, due to a widespread power outage, so while it was pretty skied out, it wasn't packed out yet. I guess I can switch at lunch. Skiing them back to back would be helpful.


My impression is that the 112RP does not play well in dense heavy cut up. If your snow is lighter than what we have been getting here its probably all good. For reference we added 10" of water weight to our snowpack in 5 days.

 

post #4 of 22

yeah, I would think a ski like a cochise would be awesome on a wet dense day. I don't think the 112 was really intended for that. When it turns to elephant snot, its really hard to call that powder and the nomenclature "RP" resort powder, does not apply. biggrin.gif

post #5 of 22

Marshall was certainly good landing air on them.

Tromano, how much do you weigh? Did you try the shorter length?

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Marshall was certainly good landing air on them.

Tromano, how much do you weigh? Did you try the shorter length?

 

I am 210lb. 190 is the correct size for this type of ski IMO. They ski pretty short actually.

 

post #7 of 22
Quote:

 

Crud: This was a wet snow day so the powder turned to crud pretty quickly and setup in some interesting ways. The ski felt good  for the most part. It is stiff enough for my skiing style and I certainly never felt the ski was about to fold up or whatever. It does well for hauling ass in crud when up on edge. However when running flat, the ski tends to ride up and over rather than punching through the heavy stuff. The 112RP gave me some really bad shin bang despite it being a powder day afternoon. I fought through it the first day but the second day, I gave up and swaped.

 


I feel that skis like the S7, 112RP, Bents, etc, are not meant to straight-line soggy crud, period.  They are much better for turning:-)  So there is no contradiction.  112RP was very good in picking my way through crud on a day I tested it at Squaw.  My own pair has been unused so far this year (no, no shredding GoldCoast pow on the bananas yet).  We get our fair share of the heavy snow here (when we get snow), so there should be ample opportunity to observe and report.  Of the skis I tried so far, 112 was by far the best  compromise between rocker, stiffness and damping.   

post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 

Here is a picture of the conditions I am referring to. This was 11AM. Temps were in the high 20s  throughout the day.  The snow was heavy, but it was not bad crud or mashed potatoes or whatever. I see this as good easy to ski "crud"  snow.

396427_10100232263229474_5322394_46123219_1137634300_n.jpg


Edited by tromano - 1/23/12 at 1:16pm
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post


I feel that skis like the S7, 112RP, Bents, etc, are not meant to straight-line soggy crud, period.  They are much better for turning:-)  So there is no contradiction.  112RP was very good in picking my way through crud on a day I tested it at Squaw.  My own pair has been unused so far this year (no, no shredding GoldCoast pow on the bananas yet).  We get our fair share of the heavy snow here (when we get snow), so there should be ample opportunity to observe and report.  Of the skis I tried so far, 112 was by far the best  compromise between rocker, stiffness and damping.   

 

I think I could have made myself more clear. I was not straight lining a whole run. I am talking about the transition form the belly of one turn to the belly of the next where the bases are pretty much flat on the snow that was where the skis felt pretty rough. First impressions was I don't think this ski absorbs terrain as well as I would want for the conditions of the day. In contrast the One felt great and ate it up. And I don't think the One is even a strong crud ski compared to other skis that are out there. 

 

I don't want to pick my way though crud shopping for turns. Which is pretty much what this ski felt like it wanted to do. I want a ski that will transition from one turn to another where I want it to with out beating me up. Every storm is different. Perhaps next time when we get a nice  blower cold storm day it will be much better but in this  warm storm snow it was not working once the snow was cut over  a few times.

 

This ski has been described as a ski that can ski all day on a powder day with out wanting to change them out at the car for a crud buster in the afternoon. So far for me it is 0/2 in that department. frown.gif Never the less, I am stoked on this ski for all the things it actually is good at and it does seem like a very rad powder ski.


Edited by tromano - 1/23/12 at 2:31pm
post #10 of 22

Do you really think they are almost as good as PPs in the powder and windbuff?

>?!

post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post

Do you really think they are almost as good as PPs in the powder and windbuff?

>?!


Depending on what you want out of the ski perhaps better. But I will need more days on them to really make up my mind. ;) The praxis really work better the more centered a stance you have. This ski feels alot more tip floaty so it will do well with a bit more of a conventional skiing from the cuff of the boot.

 

 

They don't slarve on demand like the Praxis and tree skiing they are not quite as quick turning in the trees, but its pretty close. They have alot more stability in the open, float just as well (maybe better). 

post #12 of 22

I skied that type snow today on my MX88's, total blast, don't think I'd want to ski a 110-115 ski in that, not that one couldn't. I save the wide boys for the bigger snow daze.

post #13 of 22

 

Title: 2013 DPS Wailer 112 Pure SE w/matte finish

 

Product:

Length Tested:190 

Camber  Early Rise Tip & Tail w/camber, 

Binding: Marker Griffon demo

Mount point: Suggested (boot center) 

 

Environment & Conditions:

Location of Test: Northstar

Number of Runs: 10

Snow Conditions: 20" of heavy snow

Demo or Own: Own

 

Tester Info:

Username: Philpug

Age: 48

Height/Weight: 5'11" 190lb

Ski Days/Season: 60+

Years Skiing: 40ish

Aggressiveness:  Moderate(Finesse) 

Current Quiver: Rossignol Experience 88, Blizzard Bonafide, DPS Wailer 112RP Pure (plus vintage/retro skis)

Home Area: Northstar/Squawpine- passes at both.

Preferred Terrain bumps, off-piste, trees

 

Review:

I thought I would add to Tromanos review and bring the Pure into the thread. Many times I have been asked.."Is the Pure worth the difference over the Hybrid?" Well, yes and no. If you are looking for a ski for the backcountry, the Pure is the way to go for it's lightness. In the frontside the Pure is definitely lighter in both actual weight and surely feel. There is more if a difference in feel than I expected, it is light and nimble as when (back to the car analogies), if you ever swapped regular set of wheels for a lightweight set of nice forged race wheels, you immediately notice the unsprung weight go down immediately, that is what the feel of the Pure is like, there is an obvious difference in unsprung weight. For some that difference is negligible for those who are discerning, the difference is dramatic. The Pure takes the Wailer from a very nice powder ski to a special one. Well that was my experience in powder.

 

Northstar had some of the main arteries groomed and I played with the 112RP on them, I forgot how well this ski carves. The 112 was a load of fun laying over on edge and bringing across the hill. Granted when I was doing this it was hero snow but the Wailer still shined. 

 

Overall, if you are looking for a powder ski, the regular Wailer 112 is by all means a fine ski and I would recommend it to anyone but the Pure is special and if you want the ultimate powder ski at a premium price. Treat yourself the the Pure and if you want something extra special, the Pure SE in the burgundy is a beautiful ski. 

 

post #14 of 22

So how about the crud? Would there be a difference in pure vs not? I would suspect the pure to be less crud capable.

ps:

I noticed you didn't include the Kastle 88 in your quiver. Don't tell me you sold it to Rossi...

post #15 of 22

Wow, such a beautiful soft snow day.  This is what we called "10 am weekend untracked" at Squaw Valleybiggrin.gif.    You and I are probably the same weight, as I think we tend to own similar skis.  On my test, the 112's tip did a very good job absorbing the large irregularities and the dampness of the hybrid took care of the small stuff.  I was not picking my way around the piles, but I was not blasting through them ( as I would do on my now sold off Huge Troubles).  I actually liked the feeling enough to buy the skis.  Every good rockered ski will perform will in virgin powder, the key is what it does when the powder gets tracked.  I wish I had more experience on my 112 by this time of the year...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I think I could have made myself more clear. I was not straight lining a whole run. I am talking about the transition form the belly of one turn to the belly of the next where the bases are pretty much flat on the snow that was where the skis felt pretty rough. First impressions was I don't think this ski absorbs terrain as well as I would want for the conditions of the day. In contrast the One felt great and ate it up. And I don't think the One is even a strong crud ski compared to other skis that are out there. 

 

I don't want to pick my way though crud shopping for turns. Which is pretty much what this ski felt like it wanted to do. I want a ski that will transition from one turn to another where I want it to with out beating me up. Every storm is different. Perhaps next time when we get a nice  blower cold storm day it will be much better but in this  warm storm snow it was not working once the snow was cut over  a few times.

 

This ski has been described as a ski that can ski all day on a powder day with out wanting to change them out at the car for a crud buster in the afternoon. So far for me it is 0/2 in that department. frown.gif Never the less, I am stoked on this ski for all the things it actually is good at and it does seem like a very rad powder ski.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Here is a picture of the conditions I am referring to. This was 11AM. Temps were in the high 20s  throughout the day.  The snow was heavy, but it was not bad crud or mashed potatoes or whatever. I see this as good easy to ski "crud"  snow.

396427_10100232263229474_5322394_46123219_1137634300_n.jpg



 

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post


My impression is that the 112RP does not play well in dense heavy cut up. If your snow is lighter than what we have been getting here its probably all good. For reference we added 10" of water weight to our snowpack in 5 days.

 



Our snow probably has been lighter -- it hasn't been blower, but I wouldn't call it dense, either. I did ski the Blizzard today; overall the correct choice, but there was a time or two I thought the other would have been better. 

 

I definitely like the DPS better than my old S7  in the tracked snow, but I was pretty sure that would be the case. It's kind of the entire reason I bought it ... I am actually very happy with the Crush, in all conditions, but my curiosity was piqued, and I thought I could use a little more oomph on some days ... and I was talking on the phone with Phil one day ... and whaddaya know ... I just bought skis. wink.gif  I do find that it smooths out and absorbs the afternoon chop very very well, and I'm amazed at how many different kinds of turns I can make, all in a row, with no problem. I've only skied it two days, though. 

post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

So how about the crud? Would there be a difference in pure vs not? I would suspect the pure to be less crud capable.

ps:

I noticed you didn't include the Kastle 88 in your quiver. Don't tell me you sold it to Rossi...



You would think the Pure would get thrown around in the know I skied and it actually didn't. 

 

As far as the MX88, in building s 3 ski quiver, I have the Bonafide as my 80% ski, it was tough just to justify TWO $1200.00 skis for 20% of my skiing. 

post #18 of 22


Quote:

Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

You would think the Pure would get thrown around in the know I skied and it actually didn't. 

 

As far as the MX88, in building s 3 ski quiver, I have the Bonafide as my 80% ski, it was tough just to justify TWO $1200.00 skis for 20% of my skiing. 

You already had it though....you did sell it to Rossi, didn't you??

Plus, you know that last 20% takes 80% of the resources.

What's the third?

 

So the 112RP is your over 10 inches of powder ski?
 

 

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 

Current Quiver: Rossignol Experience 88, Blizzard Bonafide, DPS Wailer 112RP Pure (plus vintage/retro skis)

 

Review:

I thought I would add to Tromanos review and bring the Pure into the thread. Many times I have been asked.."Is the Pure worth the difference over the Hybrid?" Well, yes and no. If you are looking for a ski for the backcountry, the Pure is the way to go for it's lightness. In the frontside the Pure is definitely lighter in both actual weight and surely feel. There is more if a difference in feel than I expected, it is light and nimble as when (back to the car analogies), if you ever swapped regular set of wheels for a lightweight set of nice forged race wheels, you immediately notice the unsprung weight go down immediately, that is what the feel of the Pure is like, there is an obvious difference in unsprung weight. For some that difference is negligible for those who are discerning, the difference is dramatic. The Pure takes the Wailer from a very nice powder ski to a special one. Well that was my experience in powder.

 

Northstar had some of the main arteries groomed and I played with the 112RP on them, I forgot how well this ski carves. The 112 was a load of fun laying over on edge and bringing across the hill. Granted when I was doing this it was hero snow but the Wailer still shined. 

 

Overall, if you are looking for a powder ski, the regular Wailer 112 is by all means a fine ski and I would recommend it to anyone but the Pure is special and if you want the ultimate powder ski at a premium price. Treat yourself the the Pure and if you want something extra special, the Pure SE in the burgundy is a beautiful ski. 

 

You know phil, whats really peculiar to me is just how similar your quiver and mine are right now. Maybe we are just drinking the same flavor of koolaid. beercheer.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Quiver:

190 DPS 112RP Hybrid

184 Blizzard the One

178 Dynastar Sultan 85

 

 

post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 

Was out for a half day tour. They have some nice grip on the skin track. And they are pretty rad in conditions of the day (6" of soft surface snow over a week old slab).

 

These have some nice pop to them and I like the flex in the right side up snow. I feel like I am skiing well on these and they are easy to bend in the soft snow and noodle in the tight trees or go in bigger turns in the open shots. Fun fun fun.


Edited by tromano - 1/28/12 at 5:14pm
post #21 of 22

Dawg just mounted mine (190 hybrids) the other day, can't wait to get them out, waitin for a little fresh stuff.

 

 

post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

We finally got a cold storm had about 4" of snow in the morning and more through out the day.  It was so nice to get that more blower consistency of snow after having mank most of the season. Skied them all day. Snow waas varibale based on aspect, N, NE was soft pow on a nice soft base. E, SE was dust on crust. Later in the day additional accumulations covered over the crustiness. We skied the SE facing backside once and it was full on dust on crust. My buddy said he was having some real trouble but I thought it was OK on these. No real hooking or strange bucking when hitting the crust.

 

 The112RP is a pretty awesome tree ski. Basicly I see it as a combo of my two fav tree skis (blizzard's one and the Praxis powder). The 112RP takes elements form each and improves upon both in the trees when there is new snow to be had. I skied some of the tight lines faster than ever before.  Quick, floaty smeary fun shape, and from the conventional side a bit more stability / absortption in tracked sections, and they are easy to ski in a good rhythm with he pop in the tails. Not overly stiff.


Edited by tromano - 2/19/12 at 8:16pm
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