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Carrying stuff while you ski - Page 2

post #31 of 56

Definitely with you on this. No way would I backpack it on a resort, just something wrong with that picture.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

Hmmm, lots of Arc'teryx whores on this thread.. me too, and my Stinger shell has the teensiest pockets in ski-dom. Still, I rarely ski with a pack at any resort here in the East. It just looks too pretentious. "Look at me, the BC skier, braving the wilds of Okemo!" redface.gif

 

Out West, if the mountain has significant hike-to/side-country terrain then someplace to lash my skis and store water and emergency chocolate bars is essential. I like the look of that 11L Dakine posted by ecimmortal, much slimmer than my EMS daypack. I may grab one of those for my Taos trip in March (providing they get some more SNOW).

 

hissyfit.gif

snowfalling.gif

 



 

post #32 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

If you leave it there a couple of years, it will be pretty worthless when you finally do need it.

 

It doesn't age any faster there than sitting in my pack. I do change it out every couple of years and it's still pretty damn sticky! Worked fine the only time I actually needed it.

 

The trick part is finding duct tape to match the color of your poles. cool.gif
 

 

post #33 of 56

ORTOVOX,  http://www.ortovox.com/free-ride/free-rider-phantom-24-1     I bought this a few years ago and LOVE IT,  It's small super light, has ski/snowboard attachments, The waist strap is flxible,  has a  whistle, Has a hydration pouch, (which I don't use). AND full blown BMX spine protection built in to it.   Yep, BMX padding built to the padding (think light and protection), Again,  I absolutely love this pack and the protection if gives me.    I still huck cliffs but I'm getting older now, sooo, I like to have the option to check my landing without smacking my back on something, or just hard pack.  

post #34 of 56

Inbounds, maybe a multi-tool and a gummi stone, cell phone, small note pad and pencil for work. Duct tape on poles

 

Slack country stuff, the above + beacon, probe, shovel, maybe a liter of water, small emergency kit, maybe an extra top insulation layer, compass w/ slope angle indicator.  ( Dakine Helipro pack)

 

BC... the above + more stuff, but in general, keep it light and fast. BC pack converts to a bivy sack. Add fire starting stuff, a bottom insulation layer + the top (Patagonia puff ball stuff), and a snow saw. Extra goggles or glasses, extra gloves, balaclava, hat, emergency food and the like.  (old BD pack, about 20l or so. Will replace with an avalung pack of similar capacity next season)

post #35 of 56

Wow..that's alot of stuff. I'm such a minimalist when it comes to resort skiing. I don't even carry all my keys with me, only my car key that I detach from the rest. So car key, ski lock, phone and money (no wallet just cash + bank card wrapped in an elastic)..that's it! Don't like the feeling of anything heavy. I would be so paranoid having all that stuff you listed.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

My Marmot jacket has pockets galore and I can carry almost anything in it.  I love the thing, especially since I hate wearing a pack.

Regularly I carry:

leatherman

first aid kit

radio

phone

camera

extra batteries

food

drink

kleenex

passes

powder cords

duct tape (just a little bit, not a full roll)

nylon line

probably other stuff that I can't think of

 

The downside is that it's really heavy when fully loaded.



 

post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Inbounds, maybe a multi-tool and a gummi stone, cell phone, small note pad and pencil for work. Duct tape on poles

 

Slack country stuff, the above + beacon, probe, shovel, maybe a liter of water, small emergency kit, maybe an extra top insulation layer, compass w/ slope angle indicator.  ( Dakine Helipro pack)

 

BC... the above + more stuff, but in general, keep it light and fast. BC pack converts to a bivy sack. Add fire starting stuff, a bottom insulation layer + the top (Patagonia puff ball stuff), and a snow saw. Extra goggles or glasses, extra gloves, balaclava, hat, emergency food and the like.  (old BD pack, about 20l or so. Will replace with an avalung pack of similar capacity next season)

Extra socks and a small candle :)
 

 

post #37 of 56

I HATE dealing with lockers, and I REALLY hate it when people leave bags all over the lodge on and under tables everywhere hogging space when they aren't even there leaving no foot space of others paying money and trying to relax with a hot meal and cold drink.

hopmad.gifhissyfit.gifRules.gif

 

The size of your pockets and pouches is directly proportional to the size of the resort you are skiing at and beyond.  If I can grab a REALLY good parking spot only a few hundred feet from the ski slope I will leave almost everything in the car for most eastern and Midwest resorts.  Ideally, just a wallet, keys, chapstick, camera phone, and a platypuss are on my person while skiing.  I leave the lock and boot sole covers on the railing at the base lodge. .

 

At a larger western resort I would certainly entertain the idea of a small pack to add additional options such as goggles/glasses options, tiny roll of duck tape, leatherman, better camera, snack food or a sandwich, I'll also bring a whistle but hang that around my neck.   A pack is also nice should I want to lose a layer/sweater in the afternoon without having to trek all the way back to the base or car.

post #38 of 56

We need to start a movement to bring back the stylish fanny pack.

post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post

We need to start a movement to bring back the stylish fanny pack.



Or to leave all your stuff in the car.....

 

post #40 of 56

I rarely go back to the chalet when I'm alone at a resort, which is 90% of the time.  I also hate having to lock up my ski's to walk back to my truck in the parking lot.  For me carrying a pack at a resort is the only way. 

 

In my pack:

 

Shovel (for making/fixing kickers)

Wallet

Keys

iPhone

Sunscreen

Advil

Jager

Mary Jane

2L Camelbak

Extra Layer(s)

Redbull

Snacks

 

With a 20L Dakine Heli Pro it's plenty of room,  I sometimes even store water/snacks for friends. It in no way effects the way i ski and the ski carry is nice for a quick hike .

 

post #41 of 56

I've seen the duct tape wrapped around the upper area of a ski pole as storage until needed. You prob have to replace it occasionally. One thing less bulging your pockets.  I also reserve a pocket for glasses only, nothing in there can ever be dirty, hard, or scratchy, just glasses, cleaning and fog cloths etc.

 

huhh, your list has holes in it. lighter? implement? that's a designated pocket or compartment

 

curious about my stuff (a pocket by pocket checklist):

 

chamoix cloth

fog cloth

skigee

piece paper and pencil

pass

wallet

car key

leatherman

diamond file

whistle

nuts and raisins in a snack bag

flask for water

handkerchief

sometimes ibuprofin

sometimes Canon SD 1100

ahem, with ahem and a ahem in a nylon pouch

 

yep, not too sleek, kinda' bulgy in places, probably weighs about 6 pounds, eh?


Edited by davluri - 1/18/12 at 7:25pm
post #42 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

 

It doesn't age any faster there than sitting in my pack. I do change it out every couple of years and it's still pretty damn sticky! Worked fine the only time I actually needed it.

 

The trick part is finding duct tape to match the color of your poles. cool.gif
 

 

It was too sticky -- one layer peeled off and left the reinforcing mesh stuck to the next layer.  It was well on its way to becoming one solid mass.  It was on there about 10 years, though.
 

 

post #43 of 56


you are lacking in mechanical difficulties.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post


 

It was too sticky -- one layer peeled off and left the reinforcing mesh stuck to the next layer.  It was well on its way to becoming one solid mass.  It was on there about 10 years, though.
 

 



 

post #44 of 56

In the spirit of excess, here is what was in my pack:

 

P1030424.JPG

moleskin w/ alcholol wipes -- unopened, guess I don't need it.

baggie of bandaids -- I've given them to other people quite a few times

sunscreen

rescue foil blanket - unopened, but insurance

ear flaps and vent plugs for my helmet -- it was warm last time I skied

neck gaiter

sunglasses

three quarters -- probably change I didn't know what to do with

reading glasses

the other lens for my goggles (in a white sock)

anti-fog wipe -- bought pack of three, never used them

GPS -- for fooling around with recorded tracks, not really to navigate

the camera would be in the black case, but it is taking the picture

water bottle

trail map

pouch with powder cords

cliff bar

chocolate square

eye drops for contact lenses

chapstick

goggle squeegee -- I never remember I have it when I need it

goggle chammy/sponge wipe -- ditto

leatherman

pen

screwdriver with 4 bits -- this is a great tool

lock

handkerchief

self-sticking velco strap

whistle

cable ties

if I was skiing, the car keys would be there too

Edit - and a dry pair of socks

 

Wow -- 31 items, not even counting the quarters separately.  More than I thought.

 

If conditions indicate, a shovel and probe will just barely fit in the outside pocket.

 

And here is the pack, with a shoe for scale:

 

P1030425.JPG

post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Unless you're skiing in the BC why carry anything?

 

That's what they have lodges for, which in many cases are top, mid mountain and base.

I hate feeling like a pack mule when resort skiing.....


On principle I hate to agree with RS on anything, but he's got this one nailed. Wearing a pack when you're doing lift-served is just posing...

 

post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


On principle I hate to agree with RS on anything, but he's got this one nailed. Wearing a pack when you're doing lift-served is just posing...

 



In general, I agree, but there are many exceptions. You're on the 'ice coast'. We've just gotten/still getting dumped on in the PNW. Tree wells, poor vis, etc... There's very good reason to carry a whistle, wear a beacon, and carry a shovel and probe at the moment. Look up 'tree wells' on youtube. Area (inbounds) ski hazards are not static, nor are they universally applicable everywhere in the US.

 

A few seasons ago up at Whistler, we were called 'poseurs' by some tourists. Happened to be we were on our way to hike out of the Blackcomb glacier for a great day of skiing around the Spearhead glacier, then back to the area at the end of the day. Sometimes ignorance is just what it is. We had a great day, and I'm sure they did too. Two different programs. One required gear, the other didn't. Seems that on the internet, many have trouble imagining anything beyond their immediate experience and reality.

post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



Or to leave all your stuff in the car.....

 



Always a GREAT option at our tiny little Eastern resorts when you can park close.  At a GIANT place, not so much..

post #48 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Quote: Originally Posted by Rossi Smash Or to leave all your stuff in the car..... Always a GREAT option at our tiny little Eastern resorts when you can park close. At a GIANT place, not so much..

Especially with multiple faces. For what? Water or another layer? Pack it and forget it, even a 10L pack can hold a lot for resort skiing.

Edit:
Some resorts it would take at least 30min of traveling time just to go back down to your vehicle and back up to where you were skiing. Not everyone enjoys the groomers on the frontside of a busy mountain for a shirt. Reach into my bag, 2 min time and I'm back to skiing.

If anyone says I'm posing, well you go back to your car and I'll do the skiing. Sounds like their the poser.
Edited by huhh - 1/19/12 at 9:59am
post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post



In general, I agree, but there are many exceptions. You're on the 'ice coast'. We've just gotten/still getting dumped on in the PNW. Tree wells, poor vis, etc... There's very good reason to carry a whistle, wear a beacon, and carry a shovel and probe at the moment. Look up 'tree wells' on youtube. Area (inbounds) ski hazards are not static, nor are they universally applicable everywhere in the US.

 

A few seasons ago up at Whistler, we were called 'poseurs' by some tourists. Happened to be we were on our way to hike out of the Blackcomb glacier for a great day of skiing around the Spearhead glacier, then back to the area at the end of the day. Sometimes ignorance is just what it is. We had a great day, and I'm sure they did too. Two different programs. One required gear, the other didn't. Seems that on the internet, many have trouble imagining anything beyond their immediate experience and reality.


Yeah, I should always include an emoticon. Meant that (partly) tongue in cheek. Obviously, lots of good reasons to carry a pack. But ya gotta admit that for every one of you who have legit purposes (and few have mentioned it, but using a serious camera and a coupla lenses also counts as legit), there are 10 who do it so their shiny new Dukes don't look out of place in the blue square lift line...wink.gif (See, helpful)

 

And it's flat inappropriate to bring up snowfall to easterners right now...

 

 

 


Edited by beyond - 1/19/12 at 10:38am
post #50 of 56

I went headfirst into a tree well on a front side trail at Killington once. Skis hung up pretty good in the branches. I was able to reach my bindings and release them  - BONK!!! (thank you, helmet). If I'd been hurt or really stuck, a whistle or light would've come in handy.Who'da thunk?

 

Those were the days... when we had SNOW! frown.gif

post #51 of 56

For those of you that carry a skigee and whistle, you should try one of these. I use it for my skigee, whistle and pocket watch - and I used to have my pass on there before they stopped us from punching holes in passes. It is a Gear Keeper and unlike the cheapo little string ones, this one uses a wire and has a strong retractor spring. They make various versions for scuba, cop mics, cb's, etc. I clip it to the bottom of my suspenders and it hangs out just below my jacket. I can use the skigee or whistle without digging into a pocket, and then just let go. The cable won't break and has enough length to even wipe goggles for other chairlift riders.

 

31CXW0m%2BgEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

 

Other stuff that I carry varies depending on the conditions and what I'm doing. I always have my iPhone in a small ziploc baggie and usually in its own pocket. Since I hate the earflaps on a helmet, I carry a thing lycra headband in case it is really cold (I got a really thin Pearl Izumi one that I like right now, but any cycling type will work). In my teaching coat/pants I keep a few things that don't go in my regular gear, like: spare neck gator in case a kid gets really cold, one or two pair of hand warmers (again, for cold students), pen/paper, business cards and rescue dog trading cards, a bag of gummi bears (bribes for kids), $20 lunch/beer money, some napkins to wipe snow out of goggles after a crash and sometimes a small bar of wax in case students' skis are clogging with snow. I never carry my wallet on the hill any more - too much risk of losing it. If I know it is going to be a busy day and I may not get back to the lodge, I'll also throw in a granola bar or some other snack.

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


On principle I hate to agree with RS on anything, but he's got this one nailed. Wearing a pack when you're doing lift-served is just posing...

 



Unless you don't ever want to go to the lodge, or go to the car, and want to have a few things with you. Including water. I drink a ton in just a few hours, generally go through a couple of liters while skiing. I also prefer to snack on the lift throughout the day.

 

I just skied 4 hours in heavy wet snow. Midway through I changed gloves, and my face covering, as well as threw on a mid layer. Should I have gone back to the lodge everytime I wanted to do this, or drink some water? Just so you wouldn't think I'm a posing?

 

 

post #53 of 56

I would use a pack sometimes (spring lunching and partying, unstable and changeable weather) if it were less constricting, more comfortable, and didn't create a sweat spot on my back. I like being prepared. so still, 8 pocket jackets and a possible 6 pocket vest underneath. years of road cycling habituates me to using pockets for everything I think.

 

 

post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post

For those of you that carry a skigee and whistle, you should try one of these.

 

31CXW0m%2BgEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

 

 

 What is that thing?  Looks like an IUD.  And WTF is a "skigee"?

post #55 of 56


Looks like a retractable cable to me...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post

 

 What is that thing?  Looks like an IUD.  And WTF is a "skigee"?



 

post #56 of 56
A skigee is a mini squeegee for goggles. Some gloves have similar on back of forefinger.

It takes too long to go to lodge, I don't like wearing a pack, so I buy pants and jackets with plenty of pockets. Amazing what fits in pockets!

1 liter Platypus (collapsible water bottle)
Phone
Car key, cash, ID
Pass in pass pocket
Payday bar, whistle and small maglite (in handiest non-zipper pocket - think tree well)
Chapstick clipped to belt loop
Leatherman
Lighter+
Goggle bag
Sometimes tiny sunscreen
Sometimes helmet cam with spare batteries and memory cards
Sometimes even spare goggles (need to switch that to just extra lens)

Favorite jacket has armor (I've hit a few trees), so setup shockingly heavy when I take it off, but hardly notice when it's on. I like ski pants with tons of thigh pockets (zipper and Velcro ones).

Pockets and Platypi are awesome!
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