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Carrying stuff while you ski

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 

What is the best way to carry stuff (water, sandwich, maybe extra top) while skiing?  Somethings that's easy and you don't need to struggle with on the lift?

post #2 of 56

What's wrong with a small Camelback type daypack? No problem on any lift I ever rode.

 

Just how big a sandwich do you tend to carry? biggrin.gif

 

post #3 of 56

Unless you're skiing in the BC why carry anything?

 

That's what they have lodges for, which in many cases are top, mid mountain and base.

I hate feeling like a pack mule when resort skiing.....

post #4 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

What's wrong with a small Camelback type daypack? No problem on any lift I ever rode.

 

Just how big a sandwich do you tend to carry? biggrin.gif

 



icon14.gif

 

post #5 of 56

I have a small daypack too -- the smallest one I could find with ski-carry straps.  And I have the side webbing cinched way down.

Only put a water bottle (I hate drinking from a tube), dry socks, a cliff bar, and a couple tools.  Very rarerly feel pushed forward, on a bunny hill (kid sized) lor old wooden seat  chairlift.

post #6 of 56

I use a small Dakine daypack with a Camelback insert that goes in and out for cleaning back at home. The small pack allows you to put a sandwich, candy bar, as well as the necessities of the day (whistle, small knife, aspirin, powder straps, etc., etc).

 

At a large resort, where it's a few lift rides to get back and forth to a lodge, or if you don't want to be stuck with the great unwashed at lunchtime, but rather have a quiet lunch in the woods, the small pack works great.

post #7 of 56

Staying hydrated is one very good reason to carry a pack of some sort. The one-strap sling packs with waist band offer the ability to easily swing the pack around to your front while riding a lift, and it also makes it much easier to access the stuff you have inside of it. (extra clothing, lunch, pipe and lighter... smile.gif )

post #8 of 56

 

I have a locker at the day lodge, so I just go there if I need to add or shed a layer, swap goggles, or something along those lines.  I rarely carried a pack even before getting the locker, tho.....too much hassle.  

A bottle of OJ, a snack, Kleenex, phone, and other minor sundries just go in my pockets.  

 

Most ski jackets/pants have a plethora of pockets, so I would think you could stuff most, if not all, of what you would realistically need for a day of resort skiing in one of those plentiful pockets.

 

A BC outing is another matter, of course......

 

 

post #9 of 56

This is the best thing I have found for riding lifts.

 

http://www.dakine.com/p/ski/packs/guys/heli-pack

 

Very low profile.

 

Coupled with this:

 

http://www.ospreypacks.com/en/product/hydration_packs__osprey_hydraulics/2l70_oz._hydraform_reservoir

 

I find the notion of going in the lodge horrifying.

 

I generally carry a mid layer, extra goggles, and extra gloves. Never know what the PNW will throw at you. Also there is plenty of room for a shovel, and probe when I'm going in to gated terrain.

post #10 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post

 

Most ski jackets/pants have a plethora of pockets, so I would think you could stuff most, if not all, of what you would realistically need for a day of resort skiing in one of those plentiful pockets.

 

 

 



I used to do that, but I hate the "chipmunk cheeks" syndrome of overstuffed pockets.  Plus, something heavy like a leatherman or sharp like car keys will tear a hole in a pocket liner pretty quickly.

post #11 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post


 



I used to do that, but I hate the "chipmunk cheeks" syndrome of overstuffed pockets.  Plus, something heavy like a leatherman or sharp like car keys will tear a hole in a pocket liner pretty quickly.


Well, anything I carry inbounds is pretty small or compressible, and I avoid "chipmunk cheeks" by distributing everything among different pockets.  The OJ bottle bulges out quite a bit, but I'll live with that to not carry a pack while resort skiing.  Oodles 'o pockets are just a means to avoid carrying a pack, but hey, different strokes and all....

 

Maybe I've just been lucky, but despite plenty of use and abuse, I've never torn a hole in a pocket of any ski jacket or pants.

Of course,  maybe that's because my Mommy doesn't allow me to handle sharp objects!  :) 

 

All that said, if one just must have a pack, I like Ecimmortal's suggested low-profile Dakine option.....minimalist, yet perfectly functional.  I may have to get me one!

 

post #12 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post




Well, anything I carry inbounds is pretty small or compressible, and I avoid "chipmunk cheeks" by distributing everything among different pockets.  The OJ bottle bulges out quite a bit, but I'll live with that to not carry a pack while resort skiing.  Oodles 'o pockets are just a means to avoid carrying a pack, but hey, different strokes and all....

 

Maybe I've just been lucky, but despite plenty of use and abuse, I've never torn a hole in a pocket of any ski jacket or pants.

Of course,  maybe that's because my Mommy doesn't allow me to handle sharp objects!  :) 

 

All that said, if one just must have a pack, I like Ecimmortal's suggested low-profile Dakine option.....minimalist, yet perfectly functional.  I may have to get me one!

 



I'm an Arcteryx junkie, and their jackets fit snug and have few pockets, so having them filled up is a non-starter, and I don't like mega-pocket jackets

 

A close fitting pack is the way to go. The packs I have at WB, SLC, and less so on the least  coast are all set up the same way with the same contents so I can address most any issue on the hill.

post #13 of 56

I just put stuff in my pockets, but I've got a parka with lots of pockets.

On a typical ski day, I might have

 

car keys

wallet

cel phone

ski lock

small baggie w/ pain reliever & antacid

camera

glove liners

8 oz water bottle

Cliff bar

whistle

sunscreen

 

As an aside, I've spent the last year looking for a replacement and unfortunately nobody seems to be making ski parkas with pockets anymore.  I'm not sure what gives here...

 

 

post #14 of 56
Dakine heli pro. Great size (20L) for a day trip to the resort. I have an sidewinder AR so pockets aren't an option.
post #15 of 56

I use an LL Bean lumbar pack.  It has 600 cu in volume, which holds plenty for two people.  What I like most is that if it is not full, I can sit comfortably on the lift.  If it is filled up, I can easily pull it around to my front before getting on the lift.  It has very convenient adjustment straps on the sides to loosen or tighten the belt while wearing gloves.  

post #16 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post


 



I'm an Arcteryx junkie, and their jackets fit snug and have few pockets, so having them filled up is a non-starter, and I don't like mega-pocket jackets

 

A close fitting pack is the way to go. The packs I have at WB, SLC, and less so on the least  coast are all set up the same way with the same contents so I can address most any issue on the hill.

 

Yikes, Arcteryx is indeed really nice stuff but a bit spendy for my po' pocketbook (pun intended).  I settle for a burlap sack (mostly TNF in my case), which just happens to have sufficient pocket space for my resort-only needs.  My grab-bag of MH, Marmot, and Pategonia jackets/pants have a good amount of supplementary pockets, as well.

 

Anyway, the OP asked for options, and a small pack or an assortment of various pockets on your attire are equally legit options, so it's just a matter of his personal preference. 

Speaking of options, I recently saw an ad for TNF's Powder Guide Vest; it's loaded with pockets and has a pouch on the back for shovel, probe, skins, a baby kangaroo, or whatever.  

The downside is you could buy 3 nice packs for the price of one, and if I want that much cargo space, I'll just go with a pack.

 

For the OP's preferences, the PGV could be just the ticket, tho......
 

 

post #17 of 56

Hmmm, lots of Arc'teryx whores on this thread.. me too, and my Stinger shell has the teensiest pockets in ski-dom. Still, I rarely ski with a pack at any resort here in the East. It just looks too pretentious. "Look at me, the BC skier, braving the wilds of Okemo!" redface.gif

 

Out West, if the mountain has significant hike-to/side-country terrain then someplace to lash my skis and store water and emergency chocolate bars is essential. I like the look of that 11L Dakine posted by ecimmortal, much slimmer than my EMS daypack. I may grab one of those for my Taos trip in March (providing they get some more SNOW).

 

hissyfit.gif

snowfalling.gif

 

post #18 of 56

If you are going to carry a pack inbounds - this might be a good solution. And, it seems super functional OB.

 

http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-us/shop/ski/snow-packs/bandit-pack

post #19 of 56

OGIO.

Flak.

Jacket.

post #20 of 56

You might want to check out the Arcteryx Quiver Pack too. 640 cubic inches, just big enough for the items listed on this thread and easy to swing around for lift rides... and no, I don't work for them.

Bob

post #21 of 56

My Marmot jacket has pockets galore and I can carry almost anything in it.  I love the thing, especially since I hate wearing a pack.

Regularly I carry:

leatherman

first aid kit

radio

phone

camera

extra batteries

food

drink

kleenex

passes

powder cords

duct tape (just a little bit, not a full roll)

nylon line

probably other stuff that I can't think of

 

The downside is that it's really heavy when fully loaded.

post #22 of 56

Easy - Hip Pack

Not as easy, but can carry just about everything?  -  some type of back pack.

post #23 of 56

I have a small Camelpak type backpack.  It holds equivalent of 2 liters and has a bunch of little pockets and one main pocket the I can toss in a light fleece.  I don't like the big bags and see no reason unless your hiking or doing some serious back country.  I only wear my pack when I'm out west on bigger hills, where you don't want to dork around and have to go in for water, etc.  On the east coast, its a waste and you just look like a douche.

post #24 of 56

You need, at least I do, need water when skiing out west in CO or UT.  I get so damn dehydrated, really quick.  I used to just wear a light backpack and throw like 4 16oz waters in the back.  A few years ago I drank all 4 bottles before lunch and never had to take a piss.

post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

My Marmot jacket has pockets galore and I can carry almost anything in it.  I love the thing, especially since I hate wearing a pack.

Regularly I carry:

leatherman

first aid kit

radio

phone

camera

extra batteries

food

drink

kleenex

passes

powder cords

duct tape (just a little bit, not a full roll)

nylon line

probably other stuff that I can't think of

 

The downside is that it's really heavy when fully loaded.



WOW! eek.gif

 

For inbounds skiing?

 

 

post #26 of 56

I wear a jacket with a lot of pockets, 8 I believe, and it's very convenient, a place for everything...

even my other jacket has about six.

carry too much stuff in an otherwise svelt jacket and you look lumpy. just sayin'

and yet, if you've ever been caught without duct tape...

post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

My Marmot jacket has pockets galore and I can carry almost anything in it.  I love the thing, especially since I hate wearing a pack.

Regularly I carry:

leatherman

first aid kit

radio

phone

camera

extra batteries

food

drink

kleenex

passes

powder cords

duct tape (just a little bit, not a full roll)

nylon line

probably other stuff that I can't think of

 

The downside is that it's really heavy when fully loaded.



WOW! eek.gif

 

For inbounds skiing?

 

 


Well, I've carried all of it together at once, but I usually do without the radio.  Also, where I usually ski I don't bother with bringing a drink with me because the lodges are so close to where I'm at every 10 to 15 minutes that I can stop for a H2O whenever I want.  When I ski Whistler though, I usually have the radio and drink with me.  I always carry the phone (turned off usually), first aid kit, Leatherman, camera, batteries, kleenex, powder cords, passes, and energy bar.

 

post #28 of 56

Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post

carry too much stuff in an otherwise svelt jacket and you look lumpy. just sayin'

and yet, if you've ever been caught without duct tape...


I'm skinny. If I stuffed my Arc jacket I'd look like a beanpole trying to grow pumpkins. roflmao.gif
 

Duct tape's easy. Just wrap a length around each ski pole, right beneath the grip. It doesn't affect swing weight that close to your hand.

 

post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebobski View Post

You might want to check out the Arcteryx Quiver Pack too. 640 cubic inches, just big enough for the items listed on this thread and easy to swing around for lift rides... and no, I don't work for them.

Bob


This is what I use when I carry a pack ... it's great. I stopped using it as much when I had both Arcteryx jacket and pants, then the Arcteryx pack. I felt like a dork. (Then I realized, I am a dork, so it doesn't matter.) I still don't use a pack at most resorts, but somewhere like Whistler or Europe, you get kinda far away from the base, and it's nice to have some stuff with you. One of the main uses was an extra pair of goggles or lenses, but I switched to the photochromatic ones last season, so that was one less reason to carry the pack. I also stuff extras up my pants (inside the powder cuff), like a hat or even my cat trax. Haven't lost anything yet, but sometimes it worries me.

post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

Quote:


I'm skinny. If I stuffed my Arc jacket I'd look like a beanpole trying to grow pumpkins. roflmao.gif
 

Duct tape's easy. Just wrap a length around each ski pole, right beneath the grip. It doesn't affect swing weight that close to your hand.

 



If you leave it there a couple of years, it will be pretty worthless when you finally do need it.

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