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Philpug review of Progressor series?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I seem to recall reading that Philpug intended to post a review of either the 800 or 900 ski sometime around New Years and was curious whether that happened but I can't find it, or whether it's still pending, or whether I just imagined seeing that.

post #2 of 14

The 900 is similar to the 1000 but has quite a bit less horsepower and dampening. I didn't ski the 800 and I don't think Phil did either. (could be wrong abooot that though). Here's my review of the 1000 to whet your appetite until Phil gets his $0.02 in.

 

 

Fischer Progressor 1000:

 

For some time now, Fisher has taken their World Cup SC ski model and given it a less race specific shape and flex to appeal to expert recreational skiers. These skis have had a dual radius sidecut, flowflex binding plate, and Fischers most sophisticated and advanced constructions. This latest model of Progressor has a wider (78mm) waist width than the past models. I first skied the Proressor 1000 on a very cold, hardpacked day at Winter Park Co. I was skiing a bunch of hard snow oriented skis on this day and while many of them had great grip some of them were pretty specific in turn shape. As I pushed off from the lift, the top of trail was a wide gradual pitch and I started with lazy GS turns at moderate speed. As the trail steepened, I let the speed pick up and I started to lay in more edge angle and pretty soon I was up to pretty fast recreational speeds. Right near the midpoint of the trail, I tossed out the highest edge angle that an old racer like me is likely to attempt and moved my feet aggressively through the turn. The Progressor handled the hard snow and speed and with ease and powered back under me at the end of each turn. After six or eight of what passes for a race turn (for me) I relaxed the angles and the pressure and let the ski slow down a bit. The Progressor 1000 throttled back comfortably, accepted the slower pace without problems and cruised comfortably through some crud piles near the edges of the trail.

 

The bottom third or so of the test trail drops off fairly steeply and I eased into this pitch skiing lazily and at moderate speed. As the trail steepened, I picked up my turning cadence and here is where the Progressor surprised me the most. The ski moved from lazy sweeping turns into short quick turns with ease. This is a nice surprise for a ski that handles speed as well as this one does. I threw increasingly high edge angles and more and more pressure and the ski continued to snap off quick turns with great grip and a smooth turn exit. The amount of “pop” at the end of each turn was just enough to facilitate the next turn without trying to leap out from under me like say a Slalom ski might. Right near the bottom of the trail, I dodged off the groomers and into a patch of scratchy chalky moguls. While most skis of this caliber don’t really shine in bumps, and I don’t exactly shine in those conditions either, the Progressor 1000 handled it fairly well and was forgiving of my mistakes.

 

The 1000 is the flagship of the 2012 collection and the variable turn shapes and wider width makes this the most versatile Progressor yet. This is an absolutely superb ski and among the very best in class. The Progressor 1000 is a system ski and comes with the Fischer branded but Tyrolia derived Z-13 Flowflex binding.

 

SJ

post #3 of 14

SJ,

 

At 78mm under foot, how would you rate this as a front-side oriented all-mountian ski?  Also were you on  the C-Line version or have you tried it yet?

 

post #4 of 14

Question, assuming this years 1000 is last years 10+

 

The flowflex.tune it Z13 binding has a 3 position adjustment, have any idea what the red/yellow/grey indicate?  I bought a set of slightly used Progressor C-line 10+ at the end of last year and have yet to find any sort of chart that says what the adjusters mean.  Took several nastar runs at each setting and didn't think it made any difference at all.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldjeep View Post

Question, assuming this years 1000 is last years 10+

 

The flowflex.tune it Z13 binding has a 3 position adjustment, have any idea what the red/yellow/grey indicate?  I bought a set of slightly used Progressor C-line 10+ at the end of last year and have yet to find any sort of chart that says what the adjusters mean.  Took several nastar runs at each setting and didn't think it made any difference at all.


BLACK---SOFT FLEX

RED--MEDIUM FLEX

YELLOW--STIFF FLEX

 

Not sure what it is doing inside the plate. I would like to hear from someone that knows. My guess is that there is a couple of rods/maybe piston that control pressure/rebound under foot.

 

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tag View Post

SJ,

 

At 78mm under foot, how would you rate this as a front-side oriented all-mountian ski?  Also were you on  the C-Line version or have you tried it yet?

 


The is certainly a frontside ski by current standards ('current' meaning this week I guess) but certainly skis of this width were classified as 70-30 skis not long ago. The whole front/backside thing just cannot be defined by width anymore. Rather it is more about build, technology, flex, grip and dampening. Some of the companies can pack so much tech into 82-87mm skis that despite their widths, I classify them as hard snow biased as well. BTW....correct, C-Line for sure. Actually, I don't think they make a 1000 that isn't but.....I didn't pay that much attention.....???

 

SJ

 

post #7 of 14

I have this year's version of the C Line Progressor 1000. The first day I skied them, I set the tune-it adjustment on its medium setting, which according to the the guide that came with the skis was the appropiate setting for icy conditions at my 160 lb weight. Conditions were hard pack, mostly snow making snow. The first run, Spillway at Loveland, is a short but relatively steep blue run, which, because of the traffic is usually firm snow. This day it was beyond firm - more like bullet proof in places. The skis felt like kind of a hand full on the icy sections, and I kept my speed down most of the run. When I got  back to the lift  I changed the adjustment to the stiffest setting and did the same run again - the Progressors skied like totally different skis - very stable, great edge grip, confidence inspiring at speed. Since then I have  put in about 12 days on these skis, mostly firm to hard snow. There were a few days then the snow was soft enough in the morning that I switched to the medium setting, but I went back to the stiffest setting when the snow set up in the PM.

 

The comparison to the the Fischer World Cup SC is on target - that's a ski that they remind me of. I can't wait until we get enough snow so that I can see how the 78mm width and the less stiff Tune-it adjustments perform off piste.

 

Disclosure: I am an area pro ambassador for Fischer at Loveland Ski Areas.

post #8 of 14

Were you referring to me? I own a P900 and have skied it alot in these frozen conditions, and I remember mentioning that I would be posting a review sometime around the new year.  Great ski!  I have video, and will post it when I can get it cut down by a friend (I don't have video editing software).  It is a very versatile ski.  In frozen bumps I was skiing last week (with maybe an inch of snow on top), it was far better than the other skis I was on (Bonafide and Inferno).  It absolutely tore up the icy groomers as well; not quite as secure as a pure carver, but pretty darn close (and way better than the other skis, which goes without saying).  Lots of energy.  It is actually a pretty good off-piste machine.  Tail is a little aggressive in bumps and off piste on ice, but manageable. I got used to it pretty quickly. I can get it up on edge and rely on it to be there, but not feel like the ski is stuck in a certain turn radius.  Feels more like a SL/GS hybrid, depending on the turn shape you want to make. Feels like a nice blend of all-mountain capability and frontside carving prowess.  Just what I was looking for in a ski. 

 

 

 

 

post #9 of 14

FWIW, my experience with the P1000 closely mirrors SJ's.  Bought a pair last spring on early intro, love them, basically, you get back whatever you put into them.    I haven't had them on true "ice", but they hold very well on any of the firmer conditions that I have encountered.  Last spring, had a day on them at Jackson Hole, they did great in soft crud snow over groomers, but were a little precise for true off piste situations.    Very versatile turn shape, very stable and predictable, with good energy and edge hold.  The Flowflex Tune-It plate does impact the mid body flex of the ski, black setting is the softest, red medium,  and yellow stiffest setting, the difference is most noticable on hard snow, but pretty subtle in other conditions.  IMO, these are a home run for most in-bounds skiing situations, just a ski that isn't getting much buzz because it's relatively narrow and unrockered.  Great for experts with a little racing background that spend most of their time on-piste.

post #10 of 14

I have finished my review, if anyone is still interested: 

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/109165/2012-fischer-progressor-p900-175cm-ski-review

post #11 of 14

Good informative reviews dawg and SG.  Could either of you do a direct comparison, pros and cons to the Fischer WC SC and RC, SL and GS for a mostly hard snow ski?  Not that I'm in the market; I will make do with what I have for now, just curious and...of course... you never know; things could change.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Good informative reviews dawg and SG.  Could either of you do a direct comparison, pros and cons to the Fischer WC SC and RC, SL and GS for a mostly hard snow ski?  Not that I'm in the market; I will make do with what I have for now, just curious and...of course... you never know; things could change.



While there is no doubt that the RC and SC are great skis, the top Progressor model is a better ski in a couple of ways. The first is the sidecut in that the Progressor series has always taken the RC and SC sidecuts and blended them into one progressive (get it?) sidecut that does some of what each of the other other two do. Second, the Progressor is intended as a piste oriented recreational ski. It's at the highest level of that definition of course, but nevertheless, that's the target. OTH, the RC and SC...........great as they are, are designed as race skis. They are detuned for sure and not as demanding as an FIS ski but still.....Fischer doesn't mess around too much with stuff they slap the RC 4 moniker on and racing is clearly the lineage of the RC/SC.

 

It's a fine line but the RC/SC are stiffer torsionally and offer greater grip. For skiing rail to rail on really hard snow, they are still the best. However, as soon as you say (mostly) hard snow, you are implying that there will be other conditions on the menu as well. The Progressor series has always tamed the torsion just enough to give enough grip for most mortals but just a touch of forgiveness and an easier release at the turn finish and a well modulated energy that improves the overall versatility.

 

For a hard snow oriented expert rec ski with versatility, the Progressor is outstanding.

For chasing gates, the RC/SC are still better. (But that's about the only thing they are better at)

 

SJ

post #13 of 14

Great reviews as always SJ and dawg.  As the very happy owner of a pair of Progressor 8+ for the past 3 seasons, I am always recommending the Progressor series to good eastern skiers.  Sounds like the 900 is very different from the old 9+ and that the 900 and 1000 are similar to last years 10+.  Not clear to me what the performance differences are between the 900 and 1000.  The 1000 is actually a bit wider and the bindings are different, but it sounds like they have similar performance.  As an older (65) conservative expert skier who spends a lot of days in Vermont each winter, I want a versatile ski that will be fun on the firm groomers as well as the bumps and trees and even a bit of powder and crud.  Race skis don't fit my requirements nor do the current wave of wide rockered skis.  Good to see that there continues to be choices.

post #14 of 14

How did I miss this thread? Past what Jim & Scott posted, The P series skied remarkably well for this season, uber smooth, with all the power you would expect from an "almost" race ski yet very well one of the most refined in it's class. The dual radius sidecut allowed the P1000 come across the hill with power yet it never felt like it would launch you. 

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