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Buying first set of skis.. NEED HELP!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Brand new to epicski, wanted to start it off by getting some expert opinions

 

22 yrs old 5'11 180lbs. Advanced intermediate 

 

Live in Louisiana so only get to ski 10-20 days a year. I am tired of renting and demoing so i am looking to purchase my first pair of skis. Looking for something that will allow me to do just about everything.. of course. My friends and I travel to Taos every year so im going to need something that can handle the steeps. Also a ski that can work in moderate pow, trees, and can still get me down the grooms. Im guessing something like 95~105 underfoot. Rossi s3, Line P98, salamon shogun, volkl bridge are just some skis ive heard about, no experience on any of them. Thoughts on those or any other ski that sounds right for me is greatly appreciated.

 

Our ski trip is closing in and i am getting desperate, please help. Any input is good input, thanks!

post #2 of 11

Welcome to Epic.  I don't mean to rain on your parade but you have the cart a mile in front of the horses.  What you need first is a pair of boots that fit your feet properly, which means getting them from a competent boot fitter.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology.  Then check the "Who's Who" for a fitter in Taos or Santa Fe.  If there's one listed, call and make an appointment for the first day you're there.  If there isn't one listed, ask and someone will be able to recommend a good fitter.  Follow the fitter's advice about how they should fit.  Then demo some skis.  Seriously.  If your boots don't fit like a glove, your feet will be uncomfortable and cold and you will not be able to control your skis.  Getting boots fitted by an expert is just about the most important thing you can do to improve your skiing.  You will be amazed at how much difference properly fitting boots make.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

My game plan is to find the right pair of skis, mount the bindings, and bring those to Taos. Once there I plan to go strait to a boot shop and have them fit me and tell me the right pair. I know very little about boots so I was just going to leave it in the hands of an expert. Certain brand that you prefer/recommend??? Did not realize making an appointment was even an option but that sounds like the smart to go about it. Thanks for the heads up!. Do you have an idea on the skis I should bring?   

post #4 of 11

You need boots to mount bindings on a pair of skis.  If you have older boots, you may end up having to remount than readjust the bindings because you may be in a boot that is too big.  Plus your skis will perform better if the bindings were mounted with the boots that you plan on using.  I have seen boots of the same shell size differ as much as 15 mm.

 

Think boots first, then consider skis and bindings afterwards.

 

Dennis

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by snojoe View Post

I am tired of renting and demoing so i am looking to purchase my first pair of skis.



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by snojoe View Post

My game plan is to find the right pair of skis mount the bindings, and bring those to Taos.... Do you have an idea on the skis I should bring?   

What skis did you like when you demoed?  What did you like about them?  

 

What skis didn't you like?  What didn't you like about them?
 

 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

The problem is, living in north Louisiana, I have no place to try on boots/size up bindings. And I would not buy boots online. I am going to have to wait until I get to Taos to buy boots and bindings and have an expert help me with the correct set-up and fitting. I can however purchase skis online, and know what I am getting. Atleast I hope

 

I demoed a Rossi avenger 82 and the Salomon lords.

 

I stayed on the groomers and hardpack for the most part with the Rossi(dont remember the length), which they did amazing on. Big carves, super quick edge to edge. But again that not what I am looking for. I was excited about the lords, rode the 169, and they did pretty well for the little time I had them before the sun started to set. They were decent in crud, kinda nervous on the hardpack, but I think that wasnt what they were designed for. Wish i would've gotten a chance to put them in some fresh snow or on steeps but didnt have the time.

 

Again looking for a ski that is going to give me the ability to hold steeps, play in some trees and powder, and make it down the hardpack. Something 95~105 underfoot. Maybe the Line prophet 98, the S3, volkl bridge?? Just throwing out names. Thanks again

 

 

 

 

post #7 of 11

I agree that you should first look for good boots. After that, you can look for skis. I just got the S3s, haven't skied them yet though. They would probably be a good ski for you, as they are aparently pretty easy to ski. If you haven't yet, check out the Blister Gear reviews, they've reviewed the S3, and did a good job of it.

post #8 of 11

OK newbie, a few reality pills for your health:

1) Why are buying your skis on line?  At best you'll save sales tax, as most non-resort specialty shops in the US sells skis for exactly the same price, namely the Internet price.  If you're trying to save money, you're going about it the wrong way. Your counsellors here have told you (correctly) to focus on boots first as if you blow this assignment the ski you purchase will be quite immaterial. You say you want to get them in Taos, where you are sure to find boots selling at MSRP, or roughly 20% over market price.  The boot fitting assistance you receive will be first-rate and you will pay for it accordingly. You will also pay to mount whatever bindings you get which would probably not be the case if you bought the skis at the same establishment. There go your tax savings. Not to mention the abundance of good will you will engender by bringing Internet-bought skis into a specialty shop.  So whatever you do, scratch the idea of buying your skis on line. 

2) Now that that's out of the way, let's get back to this boot purchase. Of course I don't know squat about your feet - and I don't want to know - but I do know the boot market.  If you're trying to save some cash, go to a city specialty shop (avoid Sports Authority and their ilk like the plague - they know less than you do) and try on some Atomic Hawx boots: great value for what they offer. They may not fit you, but they're worth a try and will save you around $100 compared to similar models from other brands. 

3) I could explain ad nauseum why I'm picking these 3 skis for you to try when you're in Taos, but I'm going to cut to the chase.  Try the Blizzard Bonafide, Rossignol E98 and Nordica Hell & Back.  (BTW, I don't think much of your provisional list.  Toss it.) ( BTW2, I would normally include the benchmark ski in this genre, the Volkl Mantra, but frankly you're not good enough to fully appreciate it.  Volkls expect you to be good, and you're not there yet.)  Again in the spirit of not complicating your life more than it already is, buy a Salomon STH12 binding and you're done.  BTW, your demo fees will be applied to the ski's purchase price, so you don't add to your costs there. 

4) Finally, as a ski-boot-binding purchaser aimed at high-end products, you are specialty shop's dream customer. They like dream customers, but they don't much like to share them. If you have no shop of choice targeted in Taos, you couldn't do better than The Boot Doctors.  See Charley and tell him Jackson sent you...

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

So what you're recommending is just to wait all together, and purchase the whole set up at the ski valley? I cant exactly go try on a pair of boots-Atomic Hawx- because the closet place to try on boots is probably taos. Thanks for the schooling and the info on boot doctors

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonNV View Post

OK newbie, a few reality pills for your health:

1) Why are buying your skis on line?  At best you'll save sales tax, as most non-resort specialty shops in the US sells skis for exactly the same price, namely the Internet price.  If you're trying to save money, you're going about it the wrong way. 

 

Not to mention the abundance of good will you will engender by bringing Internet-bought skis into a specialty shop.  So whatever you do, scratch the idea of buying your skis on line. 

 

 


 

Huh? WHAT?

 

"At best you'll save sales tax, as most non-resort specialty shops in the US sell skis for exactly the same price, namely the Internet price"

 

REALLY? If I could find a non-resort shop selling for EVO or Levelnine prices I'd be a happy camper, but usually they're not even close. Maybe near the end of the season they'll get within 20-30% of a good internet price, but telling this guy he'll only save sales tax is complete nonsense.

 

And how would a shop "have any abundance of goodwill endangered by having non-internet skis? WHAT? My shop is fully happy to service my internet bought skis, and charge me their regular price for the service, but "goodwill" - you're kidding right? Do your internet bought skis come with a big "Internet" engraved in the base or something?

 

Complete nonsense.

 

Anyway - to the OP, you can always demo skis and decide what you like. Make sure if you do that the shop credits you any cost of rental towards purchase price. The ski types you mentioned are all good, and you really can't go wrong.

 

But - like being said in the rest of these posts - BOOTS FIRST. Right, they're nowhere near as sexy as flashy skis, but they're what you need to get yourself off on the right foot (pun intended).


Edited by snofun3 - 1/13/12 at 7:40am
post #11 of 11
Quote:

 

And how would a shop "have any abundance of goodwill endangered by having non-internet skis? WHAT? My shop is fully happy to service my internet bought skis, and charge me their regular price for the service, but "goodwill" - you're kidding right? Do your internet bought skis come with a big "Internet" engraved in the base or something?

 

Complete nonsense.

 

A better quote would be shop will be more willing to give goodwill if you bought the stuff all at their store.  

Definitely shops will throw in stuff like free mounting or adjustments if you bought the stuff in their store, compared to charging for every service or even an hourly or consultant charge just to speak with their boot tech. 

 

That being said, there are independent shops where you can always at least say I found this price online, can you pricematch or get me close, it doesn't endanger goodwill to ask and some do work close to internet prices+sales tax.

 

 

 

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