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Video Analysis please

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I was wondering if I could get some quick suggestions from y'all. Something doesn't look quite right but I can't figure out what.

 

 

I start skiing at the one minute mark the first skier is my brother. We used a gopro to film from behind.

 

Thanks a lot

 

Jake. 

post #2 of 15

Just what I see. Your tips/shovels are not cutting into the snow,more forward pressure.

Noname.jpg

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Just what I see. Your tips/shovels are not cutting into the snow,more forward pressure.

Noname.jpg


O I am the skier in front in the video starting at 1:00. My dad was wearing the go pro

 


Edited by lonewolf210 - 1/7/12 at 3:11pm
post #4 of 15

Oh no,sorry Dad. Hard to get a handle on either of the 2 skiers because they are two far away, But,first skier looked like his stance is too wide and depends to much on inside leg. Needs to balance more on the outside ski in the turn. Like the second skier. Second skier is making nice turns and about the only thing I could suggest is flex the ankle more (pressure control) in the turn. Get Dad to ski switch for a better view.wink.gif

I am no Xpert so maybe one of the pros can be more helpful.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Oh no,sorry Dad. Hard to get a handle on either of the 2 skiers because they are two far away, But,first skier looked like his stance is too wide and depends to much on inside leg. Needs to balance more on the outside ski in the turn. Like the second skier. Second skier is making nice turns and about the only thing I could suggest is flex the ankle more (pressure control) in the turn. Get Dad to ski switch for a better view.wink.gif

I am no Xpert so maybe one of the pros can be more helpful.



Yeah i know they are a little far away best we could do thou. Thnx for the input!

post #6 of 15

It's hard to tell from so far away. Nice looking turns though.

 

Lots of folks turn better in one direction or the other. When I teach golf I show people how to read their divot to see what happened with their swing. Same thing with skiing. The tracks would tell you a lot. It looks to me like you get up on the new edge quicker and with more angular separation between upper and lower body, when you turn right. In a couple of turns it looks likes there's less angular separation going left and some delay edging the new outside ski. Too, hard to tell from this angle and distance but the turns don't look quite finished before to begin releasing the edge? Like not quite enough foot/ankle/fore&aft involved in carving/rounding the last part of the turn. I noticed too that you stepped the old outside ski to parallel in the new turn a few times so maybe subconciously you're trying to make your self NOT do that? It's like the turns become less rounded as you head back to the fall line.

 

Just an opinion but shaped skis are one of the big contributors to the "Intermediate Rut" I see these days. It is so easy just to lay that sidecut over and wait for the ski to go to work. Folks get dependent on the technology and learning/experimenting sort of stop at the sidecut. In the old days and straighter edges you had to be more aggressive working weight Fore & Aft. Basically using pressure on the tip to shorten the ski. Then you had to progressively move that pressure reward to carve thru a turn. If you look at old clips of racers from the Ye Olde Days ;) the weight shift is more pronounced. We also used to teach more exagerrated weight transfer,rotation, countering and pole plants etc. Making carved short radius turns was just plain more work.

 

If you want to carve turns shorter than the side cut on shaped skis you still have to manage pressure Fore & Aft. Grab a tennis ball or a baseball and put it under your big toe. Roll your foot over the ball keeping it on the inside of your foot just to get a feel for the idea. Now, face straight ahead, ball under your right big toe. Instead of rolling the ball forward, roll it in a smooth round arc to the left keeping the ball on the inside of your foot. Feel that? That's the ankle/foot thing I'm talking about that finishes your turns with a round shape. To do this right and get a pretty two track in the snow you'll need to practice a left turn with the ball under the outside of your left foot to get the feel for the inside ski. IN both case can you feel how you Must leave your upper body still and rotate the lower to keep the ball in the right arc? Bingo :)

 

Another handy practice tool are "Air Carved" turns. Like a Hop turn but instead of just hopping into the air and swapping ends with your skis, swing them around in a smooth arc to the new edge. Find a long straight seam in the snow somewhere. Early morning groomers are perfect. Make short turns around your line. Make them as round and symmetrical as you can then side step up the hill and hava CLOSE look at you tracks. They'll tell you the whole story.

post #7 of 15

I noticed the left-right difference too.  For example, you have lots of angulation with level shoulders going to the right, not to the left. 

I also found it amusing that your first turn, before you got your rhythm going, looked a lot like your brother. Did you two learn together originally?

 

Overall nice turns, though.  I'd be happy to look like that.

post #8 of 15

lonewolf210,

 

 From What I can see, it looks like your extension is very late making the beginning of your turn very pivoted without much ski/snow engagement.  From there, your extension isn't until the fall line or after causing an angular shape to the turn rather than a round shape.  If you can get that extension at the very beginning of the turn, the rest of it becomes maintenance rather than recovery.  The lag between your turns is definitely a recovery before you can begin to turn the other way.  You seem to be well balanced on your skis and a very athletic skier, take a lesson so you can take better advantage of what you have.

 

RW

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 


Thanks for all the input I will have to work on my left hand turns.

 

RW what do you mean by lag between? do u have any drills I can do to work on them?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

 Did you two learn together originally?

 

 


Actually yes we did from a family friend

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post


Thanks for all the input I will have to work on my left hand turns.

 

 


Maybe we can help with some left handed complements? (somebody please give me a rimshot?)

 

(sorry could not resist)

 

You start your left turns by launching the upper body into them (e.g. at 1:21 right shoulder is higher than the left). My recommendation is to use the lower body to initiate turns instead. Tip the boots and let the hips follow versus pushing/pulling the hips across the skis to pull the skis onto the new edges.

 

For a lesson, I would start with a tug of war drill or various sideslips to reinforce awareness of ankle tipping movements. Next up would be a carved traverse to an uphill stop (making a "U" [or bottom half of an"o"] shaped track) with an increasingly larger "U" (i.e. more of a downhill start and faster speeds). After carving, the emphasis would be finishing the turns in countered position (letting the skis turn more uphill than the body). With that as a starting position, you will find it much easier to use lower body tipping movements to start the new turn. You can feel that the most when you do the carved traverse carrying speed into the uphill portion of the turn and then rolling onto your downhill edges well before coming to a stop. This will start a new carved turn in the other direction with a well rounded turn above the fall line. This part is where having a pro helping you can make a big difference.

 

Other exercises that might be fun:

Do a straight run on a gentle slope and roll your ankles from side to side. Start with very small ankle tipping movements resulting in very shallow turns , but roll to the other side before the skis take your upper body out of the straight down the hill path. As you pick up speed and establish a rhythm, let your feet get farther out away from your body (i.e. develop higher edge angles) while still keeping your upper body travelling in a straight path.

 

Finish a turn with your skis going slightly uphill then hop into the air and turn your skis so that you can land starting a new turn with your skis on your new inside edges (i.e. change edges in mid air). Carve the finish of the new turn and repeat.

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post


Maybe we can help with some left handed complements? (somebody please give me a rimshot?)

 

(sorry could not resist)

 

You start your left turns by launching the upper body into them (e.g. at 1:21 right shoulder is higher than the left). My recommendation is to use the lower body to initiate turns instead. Tip the boots and let the hips follow versus pushing/pulling the hips across the skis to pull the skis onto the new edges.

 

For a lesson, I would start with a tug of war drill or various sideslips to reinforce awareness of ankle tipping movements. Next up would be a carved traverse to an uphill stop (making a "U" [or bottom half of an"o"] shaped track) with an increasingly larger "U" (i.e. more of a downhill start and faster speeds). After carving, the emphasis would be finishing the turns in countered position (letting the skis turn more uphill than the body). With that as a starting position, you will find it much easier to use lower body tipping movements to start the new turn. You can feel that the most when you do the carved traverse carrying speed into the uphill portion of the turn and then rolling onto your downhill edges well before coming to a stop. This will start a new carved turn in the other direction with a well rounded turn above the fall line. This part is where having a pro helping you can make a big difference.

 

Other exercises that might be fun:

Do a straight run on a gentle slope and roll your ankles from side to side. Start with very small ankle tipping movements resulting in very shallow turns , but roll to the other side before the skis take your upper body out of the straight down the hill path. As you pick up speed and establish a rhythm, let your feet get farther out away from your body (i.e. develop higher edge angles) while still keeping your upper body travelling in a straight path.

 

Finish a turn with your skis going slightly uphill then hop into the air and turn your skis so that you can land starting a new turn with your skis on your new inside edges (i.e. change edges in mid air). Carve the finish of the new turn and repeat.

I have been trying to work on the ankle rolling for a little bit and have done some side slip drills but the ones you suggested sound like they might work for me a little better. I think the hip thing my have come from trying to imitate my dad when I was younger as he tends to do it quite a bit and I have been trying to get rid of it the last season or two. 
 

 

post #12 of 15

Lonewolf210, if you get a chance to get some more video to post, I suggest that a little more turning might help.  There is not a lot of turning going on – turn more not more turns.  You are turning maybe 60 degrees compared to a full across the hill to across the hill the other way 180 degree turn.  Turning movements, skills and techniques tend to show up better in these more across the hill turns.  They also allow the video guy to keep up better for a closer look since you are going down the hill slower.

These shallow turns allow a myriad of techniques depending on your mood, the snow, the speed, who’s watching you, etc.  More complete across the hill ones tend to show a skiers basic turning mechanisms better.

Some good feedback so far.

Try making all your turns more like the ones  at 1:21 to 1:25

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowhawk View Post

Lonewolf210, if you get a chance to get some more video to post, I suggest that a little more turning might help.  There is not a lot of turning going on – turn more not more turns.  You are turning maybe 60 degrees compared to a full across the hill to across the hill the other way 180 degree turn.  Turning movements, skills and techniques tend to show up better in these more across the hill turns.  They also allow the video guy to keep up better for a closer look since you are going down the hill slower.

These shallow turns allow a myriad of techniques depending on your mood, the snow, the speed, who’s watching you, etc.  More complete across the hill ones tend to show a skiers basic turning mechanisms better.

Some good feedback so far.

Try making all your turns more like the ones  at 1:21 to 1:25


Thanks for the suggestion I will try and get some more video this weekend. I have been working on the ankle roll and think it's getting a little better my transitions feel more fluid and the turns don't feel quite as separated. 

 

post #14 of 15

You've got some great things going for you. I tried reading the other posts to see what has already been suggested. Here are my thoughts.

First, slow down a bit. Speed often help us to "cheat" our way. Your definitely young and confident, but if you are really interested in improving back down a gear or two and start working those ski more across the fall line.

Your first couple of turns there was a definite one-two move. Kind of surprised no one picked up on that. What I mean by one-two is one ski moves then the other. Once you got momentum that went away, mostly due to the momentum. Usually when we someone with a one-two it is a clear indication that they are not rolling the feet together. Find a gentle, wide piece of terrain and work on some patience turns. Slowly move across then along the ski. See if you can spend as much time going across the fall-line as you do going down the fall-line. That will lend itself to a rounder shape. I like four-five counts, but find what feels best for you.

I also noticed that it appears you are pushing you inside foot forward. You want to pull that back under you to be better in touch with both skis. think of trying to pull the toes of your inside foot up through the top of your boot towards your knee. In technical terms that is called dorsiflexion. I like to think of it like I'm driving a standard (sorry if you don't get the reference, ask dad), as I push down on the gas (outside foot) I back off the clutch (inside foot). I want it to be in a very smooth motion so I don't jump the car (you).

It also looks like you settle your hips behind your feet. Part of that comes from pushing the inside foot forward, some of that comes from staying too in the fall-line. You want to keep your center of mass (somewhere near your belly-button) over your feet and moving along the ski into the new turn. Your legs should turn more than your hips.

Try out the stuff suggested here then have dad shoot some more video for us to see. Have him stand in one spot while you ski to-by-away from the camera so we can see all angles.

One more thing... Keep it fun.

post #15 of 15

You need to keep the boots and your feet behind you more - keep the engine in the rear to start the turn. 

 

Practice sliding your skis back and forth under you on a flat green pitch. Skis move forward (as the turn finishes) then pull them back (or push your hips forward) to start your new turn. Roll the edge when they are behind you for a power move (think like sprinting starts - get the leg on the starting blocks behind) 

 

Try that for a bit - then add your same lateral motion with smoother ankles - LMK if it feels better and more in control 

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