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I never considered buying race skis until...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Until this year, I need a ski that can hold an edge at speed on bulletproof. Today got me thinking about it, as I cruised into an icy black run, and promptly landed sqaure on my hip, then continued to slide the rest of the way down the hill. I was able to self arrest with plenty of time and room, but it just got me thinking, these old intermediate level carvers just cant handle this crap. Thanks to a good friend and former racer who is hooking me up with some gs skis. How about you guys? How are you putting up with the ice?

post #2 of 14

Funny you should bring this up.  I was just looking at ads for a recreational carvers right before logging on to Epic.  

 

I am working in Utah for a while and only brought the all mountain soft snow skis, the wrong ski so far this season.

 

Maybe if enough of us spend on carving skis we can buy some fresh snow.

post #3 of 14

Yesterday, I was at Elk Mt. in eastern Pa., and, almost all I talked to were very pleased that the conditions were much better than what the had expected. That said, riding the lift under a black run, nobody was carving linked turns, nobody was doing higher speed runs and the sound of each turn produced the "sssheeeettt" noise. That trail made a lot of goods skiers look mediocure.

 

It was also the local demo day, I spent a lot time on Sl and GS skis, but, there is no magic solution even on a race ski. Top 5 % only need apply. But, yes, a hard snow ski belongs in my quiver. But, in Pa., we get these conditions each year. And Elk is doing a superior job in making and managing their snow. I was amazed how much was open.

post #4 of 14

My recreational carving skis work just fine on ice and are very forgiving.  They are Fischer WC SCs.   However, maybe that's what you mean by race skis (as opposed to FIS-legal skis).  Being as these are fairly forgiving, I can't fathom why anyone with a season or two under their belt would prefer skis with less performance than these.

post #5 of 14

You all mean that your 100+mm waist skis can't hold on ice?   After all, many of the threads here state that "there is no correlation between waist width and edge hold"  or "these skis rail like GS skis."      wink.gif

 

 

I thought it was just me who appreciated race carvers.   smile.gif

post #6 of 14

for some people, wide skis on hard snow = pain in the feet and ankles.

 

for others wide skis on hard snow = not an aesthetic, refined, experience

 

I like a race build on a 75mm ski, less high strung in conditions where some soft conditions exist, duff, piles of spray, melt, etc.

post #7 of 14

 You can ski in the backseat in soft snow,not so much when it's hard.  If you are going to carve on hard conditions you have to step up to the task. Use the conditions to improve your skill level.  I've been working on carving small Intermediate bump fields,not that easy for me. Clear and warm all next week..............what will Summer be like?

post #8 of 14

not sure where you're going with that, but a skier can not ski in the back seat with race skis in particular, on any snow, as they will launch you into the next county if you do. this due to the high energy in the tails of the ski, a combination of stiffness and rebound.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

 

I like a race build on a 75mm ski, less high strung in conditions where some soft conditions exist, duff, piles of spray, melt, etc.



Me too.  For a primarily Eastern skier like myself,  I think last years Contact 4x4  (75mm waist)  is the best ski I have ever had as far as versitility.   It worked great in Utah also.  Much more stable in ungroomed conditions than any race ski, with a great edge hold on ice(Eastern ice). 

 

I will keep these for a while.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

not sure where you're going with that, but a skier can not ski in the back seat with race skis in particular, on any snow, as they will launch you into the next county if you do. this due to the high energy in the tails of the ski, a combination of stiffness and rebound.



This is true dav. Soft snow is more forgiving. Hard conditions, flaws are more noticeable, especially on race skis. To me backseat skiing is when you do not project your CoM down the hill enough to squeeze/pressure the ski through the whole turn till release. Otherwise you can not slice the Ice.;-) Sorry for the drift.

post #11 of 14

A good slalom ski is a wonderful tool on icy hardpack! I recently got a pair of Dynastar Omeglass WC SL skis - they grip like crazy glue stuck to errant fingers (ie very strong grip!). You actually can run them through the backseat, contrary to what folks have been posting, but you'll feel the burn quickly in your quads. 

post #12 of 14

As some one who bought a 90 waist ski for my daily ski in the east I'm looking at this part of the season as perfection of my form. If I'm in the back seat it is blatantly obvious, if I'm throwing my tails to much I'm losing edge and skidding the turn, etc, etc. 7 days into the season and I already carve better than I did last year, and I can only imagine this will percolate through into the rest of my skiing once we get snow.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

My 100 waist skis will instantly tell me if Im in the back seat, the tips chatter out, however they chatter at the speeds I ski at anyway, and it KILLS my knees. My carvers are now rock skis due to early season conditions and have almost no edge left (hence the fall, I was not back seat at the time, just bulletproof ice with no edge). Im just sick of skiing these conditions with a ski that doesn't match my ability level. Im also going to do some nastar racing this year, might as well be on the right ski. They are FIS approved, world cup skis, hey, im getting them for dirt cheap, cant complain can you?

post #14 of 14

Especially with a race type ski, I see a difference between weighting the rear portion of the edge to finish a turn with some acceleration and leaning back.

 

There are some negative traits of a 100mm ski, but the tips chattering doesn't have to be one of them.


Edited by davluri - 1/8/12 at 8:28pm
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