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Fatigued easily in Powder... - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Remember, the OP is skiing on 100mm wide, light weight, tip rockered skis.

 

ski mag:

 

"Designed to introduce resort skiers to the benefits of rocker in soft and variable snow, the Access is predictable, versatile, and very easy to ski on anything from groomers to chopped-up powder. A generously rockered tip planes over powder and chunks, while underfoot camber and a GS-style turn radius give it hardpack-carving chops. Moderate flex is suitable for intermediates and casual experts looking to tackle deep snow and rugged terrain. And the Access’s light weight makes it ideal for uphill travel in the backcountry."

 

 

I think:

 

1. Get a lesson on the next powder day.

2. Get some lessons on hard pack days too, the OP needs to learn to trust the skis and NOT STEER.

3. Whatever you do, DONT stop every other turn.  The first turn is the hardest and you are making nothing but first turns.

4. Think of the tips of your skis as clock hands, pointing directly down the fall line is 12:00.  Try not to go beyond 10:00 and 2:00.  Let them run and commit to some speed!

5. Don't lean back, stay even/forward and just tip your feet/ankles side to side, be patient and let the skis do the work.

 

post #32 of 39
>>"and NOT STEER" <<

NWJG--I think I probably know what you mean by this, but could you please define exactly what the word "steer" means to you? Various skiers have different definitions of this term. By some definitions (including the way I generally use the term) steering is exactly what you do want to do in powder and elsewhere--guiding your skis through turns as well as straight runs, keeping them pointing the direction they're going as much as possible, making sure they don't twist or pivot during transitions (unless you want them to, for some reason), as opposed to twisting, pivoting, braking, and so on. To me (and to most instructors, I believe, at least in the Rocky Mountains), steering refers to all the things you do to keep your skis on track and shaping the turn, very much like it is in a car.

If by "steering," you actually mean twisting, braking, pivoting, and such, then it's a different story. Unfortunately, it's a word that needs clarification each time you use it, if you want to avoid having people misunderstand you.

Best regards,
Bob
post #33 of 39

Bob,

 

First, I read your link after posting and it was excellent!  I'm printing a copy to keep in my pocket for my wife's next powder day (assuming it ever snows again).  Thank you!

 

Yes, you are correct.  I've been using this term with my wife for the second thing you quipped:

 

"If by "steering," you actually mean twisting, braking, pivoting, and such, then it's a different story."

 

I think of it like "steering" a car and it is mostly trying to initiate a turn by steering your upper body around and trying to muscle the skis around in a pivot/skid.  We have been focusing on the "anti-turn".  Tipping the skis on edge and letting them do the work rather than "turning" them and that seems to be working well on the groomed.  She's had the most success when I asked her to start in a traverse, tip her feet and wait.  We agreed that if the skis were not "turning" by the time she got to the edge of the run, she had to stop and do it again but to never give up on them and pivot or rotate them.  Low and behold they started carving like they were designed to do and she began to trust them and give up the idea that she needed to twist to initiate a turn.  At slow speeds it takes some of patience, if she gave up, it was right at the instant the side-cut was going to take over so I got her to commit to not "giving up' no matter what.  Now we are working on being earlier and committing to a strong transfer of weight at the hips.  It is amazing at how her comfort with speed is happening as her carving skills increase.

 

In powder, the speed and skills are even more connected so I'm hoping her comfort with speed will transfer to the soft snow.

 

I plan to adopt that phrase you use "keeping them pointing the direction they're going"...excellent.

 

The combination of thousands of dollars in lessons and a lot of patience from me to help her practice is finally starting to pay off on the groomed.  I hope to move her a little more quickly in the transition to powder/crud skiing.

 

post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 

Wow.  Lots of pearls of wisdom here.  In terms of steering vs trusting the skis, I noticed that my turns, especially in powder were more zig zags than arcs.  I would try to quickly bring my skis around when turning.  Does that make sense?  It sounds like you all are saying my skis should be more pointed downhill.  I like the idea of thinking of the hill as a clock and keeping my skis between 10 and 2.  I wonder If I'd be ok with the amount of speed I'd be carrying if I did that.  Nwjg--it sounds like in your wives case,  her comfort with speed has increased... 

 

Nwjg, thanks for that blurb on the Access.  Where did it come from?

 

In terms of lessons, I'd like to take some.  I've been reading Breakthrough on the New Skis by Lito Tejada-Flores.  t seems to be an update on his Breakthrough on Skis book updated for use with "super sidecut skis" that took over a couple of years back.  Do you all recommend that book?  One thing he's emphasized is learning to feel comfortable with your weight entirely on one ski--your outside ski during a turn.  He also emphasizes not turning harder to control speed, but turning for a longer period of time.  Does all of this make sense in powder?  I'm wondering, because it sounds like in powder you want to have your weight more evenly distributed between both skis.

 

Also, as explored earlier I have a tendency to sit back on my skis.  Is it possible to lean forward too much on skis?  I'm thinking not.

 

In relation to lessons, I may have found an insane deal.  Four lessons for $115?  Sheesh:

http://www.skihood.com/Lessons/Weekly-Group-Coaching-Sessions-Bussing/Weekend-High-School-Adult-Sessions

 

I'm wondering if these lessons are the same as lessons I'd have to pay for individually.  I may end up doing it, as long as I'm not going to be in a group with high schoolers and I'll be in a group with people of my same ability level...

 

Thanks all!

post #35 of 39

Make sure you read over Bob's comments on the link he provided, they are really good.

 

Those lessons sound like a good deal.  If you get an instructor the first session that you like, try to get the same person for the next three lessons too.

 

Remember that over half of this sport is overcoming mental blocks and fears so really try to commit to what the teacher asks you to do, even if you think you might fall.  Mastering your fears is really satisfying.

post #36 of 39

zip-zag= no good.... the joy of skiing powder is that it should be a very relaxed and easy way to ski. No hard angles needed, round easy turns. Work with the snow not against it.   Zen skiing.  upright and balanced, not forward or back. Take some lessons.  I won't get into to the whole can you learn from a book conversation but there is no substitute for doing it. powder skiing does not require big sidecut.  I would tell you to look at Bob's links. In case you don't know, listen to Bob, you are getting advice from a very well-respected, top kahuna here.  think of it as "free lessons"...  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post

Wow.  Lots of pearls of wisdom here.  In terms of steering vs trusting the skis, I noticed that my turns, especially in powder were more zig zags than arcs.  I would try to quickly bring my skis around when turning.  Does that make sense?  It sounds like you all are saying my skis should be more pointed downhill.  I like the idea of thinking of the hill as a clock and keeping my skis between 10 and 2.  I wonder If I'd be ok with the amount of speed I'd be carrying if I did that.  Nwjg--it sounds like in your wives case,  her comfort with speed has increased... 

 

Nwjg, thanks for that blurb on the Access.  Where did it come from?

 

In terms of lessons, I'd like to take some.  I've been reading Breakthrough on the New Skis by Lito Tejada-Flores.  t seems to be an update on his Breakthrough on Skis book updated for use with "super sidecut skis" that took over a couple of years back.  Do you all recommend that book?  One thing he's emphasized is learning to feel comfortable with your weight entirely on one ski--your outside ski during a turn.  He also emphasizes not turning harder to control speed, but turning for a longer period of time.  Does all of this make sense in powder?  I'm wondering, because it sounds like in powder you want to have your weight more evenly distributed between both skis.

 

Also, as explored earlier I have a tendency to sit back on my skis.  Is it possible to lean forward too much on skis?  I'm thinking not.

 

In relation to lessons, I may have found an insane deal.  Four lessons for $115?  Sheesh:

http://www.skihood.com/Lessons/Weekly-Group-Coaching-Sessions-Bussing/Weekend-High-School-Adult-Sessions

 

I'm wondering if these lessons are the same as lessons I'd have to pay for individually.  I may end up doing it, as long as I'm not going to be in a group with high schoolers and I'll be in a group with people of my same ability level...

 

Thanks all!



 

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by toddlasher View Post

-wider skis
-rocker
-ski thru the burn, legs will warm up and last longer
-conditioning:

also boots that are not too soft

post #38 of 39

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by folkfan View Post

Wow.  Lots of pearls of wisdom here.  In terms of steering vs trusting the skis, I noticed that my turns, especially in powder were more zig zags than arcs.  I would try to quickly bring my skis around when turning.  Does that make sense?  It sounds like you all are saying my skis should be more pointed downhill.  I like the idea of thinking of the hill as a clock and keeping my skis between 10 and 2.  I wonder If I'd be ok with the amount of speed I'd be carrying if I did that.  Nwjg--it sounds like in your wives case,  her comfort with speed has increased... 

 

Nwjg, thanks for that blurb on the Access.  Where did it come from?

 

In terms of lessons, I'd like to take some.  I've been reading Breakthrough on the New Skis by Lito Tejada-Flores.  t seems to be an update on his Breakthrough on Skis book updated for use with "super sidecut skis" that took over a couple of years back.  Do you all recommend that book?  One thing he's emphasized is learning to feel comfortable with your weight entirely on one ski--your outside ski during a turn.  He also emphasizes not turning harder to control speed, but turning for a longer period of time.  Does all of this make sense in powder?  I'm wondering, because it sounds like in powder you want to have your weight more evenly distributed between both skis.

 

Also, as explored earlier I have a tendency to sit back on my skis.  Is it possible to lean forward too much on skis?  I'm thinking not.

 

In relation to lessons, I may have found an insane deal.  Four lessons for $115?  Sheesh:

http://www.skihood.com/Lessons/Weekly-Group-Coaching-Sessions-Bussing/Weekend-High-School-Adult-Sessions

 

I'm wondering if these lessons are the same as lessons I'd have to pay for individually.  I may end up doing it, as long as I'm not going to be in a group with high schoolers and I'll be in a group with people of my same ability level...

 

Thanks all!

 

Being in the back seat in pow is a problem that you have already identified. Being too far forward is also a problem, what you want is balance.

 

You want to keep feet more evenly weighted in powder, yes.

 

Making zig-zags in powder is a very physically demanding and inefficient  tactic to be using. The point of skiing is to move down the hill, not to link traverses. Skiing in powder is already very slow relative to other conditions. Even if you want to be defensive and ski slowly... you do not need to mash the breake pedal so hard to achieve the low speed that you want. Just enough braking will keep you at a reasonable speed with out the excessive fatigue.

 

 

 

 

post #39 of 39

Don't turn as much.

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