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any one ski scott aztec pros?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

can any one give me any bumf on scott aztec pros and how they handle different conditions please?

post #2 of 19

 

You're really digging for those cheap oldies, arentcha?  smile.gif

 

http://www.epicski.com/search.php?search=Aztec+pro

post #3 of 19

I thought that I replied to something like this. Anyways, my daily driver is a 175 cm Aztec Pro. Mine is a previous years, so the tip is non-rockered and lacks the titanal sheet.  It is a good all around ski with a frontside preference, but it can be taken off piste. 

 

I have skied the Aztec Pro in various conditions.  On hardpack, it carved beautifully.  However it lacked some of the extra grip that other skis (like Volkl AC30) have at higher speeds.  In very shallow powder there is just enough lift to ski through although a wider ski would be better.  As long as the speeds are up, the Aztec Pro can plow through rough cruddy snow.

 

I have not skied the new version, but I have been told that the addition of tip rocker and titanal have given the ski a wider sweet spot and more stability.

 

Dennis

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

You're really digging for those cheap oldies, arentcha?  smile.gif

 

http://www.epicski.com/search.php?search=Aztec+pro



 

Love a bargain cantunamunch, 

The way I see it is buy up some of these old(er)classics and get a feel for what you lot are on about,  what do you ski with!

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

Dennis, thanks mate you did already post something about these skis, much appreciated,

Will you be skiing this weekend?

post #6 of 19

I may makes some turns on Monday morning.  I try to ski at least one day a week.  I avoid the resorts on the weekends like the plague.

 

Dennis

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Dennis, What are the Aztecs like in the bumps?

post #8 of 19

The Aztecs are very forgiving in the bumps which are great for me because my bump technique sucks.

 

Dennis

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

And you're also saying they handle good but obviously not excellent in off piste,

I know someone selling a set, he's skied on them 3 weeks and he's a very recreational skier as well, they look almost brand new even though they're the 2008/9 model, I currently have a set of slalom race skis, and I'm looking to do some more off piste but still spend time on piste, is this the perfect ski Ito?

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

And you're also saying they handle good but obviously not excellent in off piste,

I know someone selling a set, he's skied on them 3 weeks and he's a very recreational skier as well, they look almost brand new even though they're the 2008/9 model, I currently have a set of slalom race skis, and I'm looking to do some more off piste but still spend time on piste, is this the perfect ski Ito?



The Aztec Pro is an enjoyable ski, but I would rather have one of the modern 86 to 90 mm waisted skis for that kind of application.  These modern skis are beautiful on the groomed snow, but have better off trail capabilities.

 

Dennis

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

When you say modern ski, do you mean rocker and all that jazz? I don't want a rocker ski, It goes completely against what I see as learning correct form, I don't mind some width on the ski though,

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny1969 View Post



The Aztec Pro is an enjoyable ski, but I would rather have one of the current 86 to 90 mm waisted skis for that kind of application.  These current skis are beautiful on the groomed snow, but have better off trail capabilities.

 

Dennis


I meant "current" as in "current model."

 

Dennis

 

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

Well Dennis, I'm with you now in the Aztec pro club got a pair for 145 British pound, barely used and just had a base grind and service

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

When you say modern ski, do you mean rocker and all that jazz? I don't want a rocker ski, It goes completely against what I see as learning correct form, I don't mind some width on the ski though,


anyone who thinks a rockered ski goes against correct form is pretty uninformed. I would even challenge you to tell me what correct form is.

 

there is no other way to put that. Try it out before you keep saying stuff like that.

 

 

 

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




anyone who thinks a rockered ski goes against correct form is pretty uninformed. I would even challenge you to tell me what correct form is.

 

there is no other way to put that. Try it out before you keep saying stuff like that.

 

 

 



 

Not much of a challenge that bushwacker, I'm no ski coach and just do as I'm told, all I can tell you is, when I was having regular coaching, turn earlier above the gate and get forward,
Please tell me about a rocker ski, because with my little knowlage of new ski designs and inovations due to completely being away from skiing for 6 years, maybe I'm getting something a little wrong, If someone skis fast on the groomed snow and often encounter icy conditions how can a ski that has been designed to  rise away from what one wants to grip in to be helpful?
If the same person has a good solid ski technique and can ski powder/crud etc with out rocker skis why would he trade off the grip for a rocker,
 
That's just my uneducated view, if I'm wrong please tell me and I won't look such a nob,
post #16 of 19

Rossymcg,

You are correct. Rocker is the latest gimmick to get people to buy new skis. Like the short ski craze of the 70s, etc. Rocker makes a ski unstable at anything but slow intermediate speeds on conditions where there is less than and inch of new snow, bumps, crud, hard snow, ice, etc. You can forget ever just tucking on a whim to see if you can accelerate faster than a 911 to 60 mph. Can't be done with these skis.

 

I have tried them on a cat trip and they were OK in 6+ inches of powder, but on anything else they were a disaster. I preferred my Rossi Axiom DP110 fat boys in the powder even though they are relatively heavy and full camber. If you know how to ski powder, don't bother.

 

Besides, why would you want 15 cm of ski flapping around in the air for 80% of the time doing nothing? Might as well buy some snow blades. Just look how many World Cup racers and bump skiers use rocker skis. ZERO. They are best used as ski fences. Fortunately full camber skis are still available.

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred928 View Post

Rossymcg,

You are correct. Rocker is the latest gimmick to get people to buy new skis. Like the short ski craze of the 70s, etc. Rocker makes a ski unstable at anything but slow intermediate speeds on conditions where there is less than and inch of new snow, bumps, crud, hard snow, ice, etc. You can forget ever just tucking on a whim to see if you can accelerate faster than a 911 to 60 mph. Can't be done with these skis.

 

I have tried them on a cat trip and they were OK in 6+ inches of powder, but on anything else they were a disaster. I preferred my Rossi Axiom DP110 fat boys in the powder even though they are relatively heavy and full camber. If you know how to ski powder, don't bother.

 

Besides, why would you want 15 cm of ski flapping around in the air for 80% of the time doing nothing? Might as well buy some snow blades. Just look how many World Cup racers and bump skiers use rocker skis. ZERO. They are best used as ski fences. Fortunately full camber skis are still available.

 So you tried one pair of rockered skis and now feel qualified to comment on the many different models and types of skis that have some form of rocker? You do know that there are many varieties of rockered skis; sure some of them are soft powder specific noodles that don't handle high speeds on hard pack very well but if you can't go 60 on a pair of rockered big mountain skis then it's the skier that's to blame, not the ski. And of course you don't see professional bumpers and WCers on rockered skis, that's not what rocker is designed for, that's just common sense. However all professional big mountain skiers, including ex world cupers such as Daron Rahlves, use rockered skis and ski faster than you, the Op, myself, or anyone else posting in this thread do regularly. The OP wasn't asking about skis for hard pack, he wants something that he can use in fresh snow and it's the almost universal conciseness of experienced and informed skiers that rocker is extremely useful and beneficial in fresh powder and crud, as well as being acceptiable in other conditions. Or you're a troll, always a possibility. 

 

OP why are you worried about the effect rocker will have on your technique? You have a pair of SL skis to practice precise movements on hard snow. There's no reason at all that these movements won't translate when you're on a rockered pair of skis. Sure rockered skis allow novice skiers to get away with technique errors that cambered skis don't allow but ROCKERED SKIS REWARD GOOD TECHNIQUE, just like cambered skis. Width is equally or more detrimental to learning good technique. So why get a pair of rightfully (no its not just marketing) obsolete skis because of a non- issue? I learned how to ski at Grand Targhee on AC 30s and then AC 50's and High Society freerides (88 underfoot traditional camber) and happily skied multiple feet of pow on them regularly. After several years I transitioned to rockered skis. Trust me, rockered skis are no marketing gimmick or crutch for weaker skiers, there's a reason that almost no manufactures currently make fat skis without rocker and the vast majority of skiers (of all abilities including and expecially the very best) choose rockered skis for powder. Arguing against rocker on powder skis is almost as ridiculous as arguing against camber on groomer skis; any competent skier can ski traditionally cambered skis in powder and full reverse skis on groomers and make them rail, but traditionally cambered skis give more power and options on groomed snow and vise versa. If possible at least demo some modern rockered skis such as the rossignol soul 7, atomic ritual, kastle BMX 108, 4frnt turbo, or ON3P Vicik (because I'm guessing you don't want to go too big or rockered) before you pass judgement. 

post #18 of 19

Interesting, rocker is the latest gimmick to get us to buy new skis, like what?  Like skis with side cut were the latest gimmick ten years ago and now are so dominant you can't buy straight skis anymore.  Boy are we stupid!  I feel like such an ass.  I thought I liked my new skis more, instead I've just learned I've been tricked.

 

And the new Head DH skis with early rise tips that were in my store a few weeks ago previously used by a Canadian national team member were probably Heads latest attempt to lose WC races.  Or maybe they've won so many with standard designs they thought they could sacrifice some to play with gimmicks for awhile.

 

Lou

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred928 View Post

I preferred my Rossi Axiom DP110 fat boys in the powder even though they are relatively heavy and full camber. If you know how to ski powder, don't bother.

 

 

Troll crossing!  Actually, if you know how to ski powder you don't need fat skis.  You're taking the easy way out with 110mm skis.

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