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Left Turns and Right Turns

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I've been practicing one legged skiing.  I'm very new to it but can get it done.  I'm also trying to only use the side cut for steering and not skidding (that's a whole other thread).  Yesterday I noticed on my right side, I can easily turn right but left was problematic and on my left side turning right was easy and left was difficult.  By difficult and problematic I mean I didn't turn as easily as I did on the other side or it didn't happen when I felt it should.

 

The skis were atomic Metron 11 b5 in 164cm 14M.  Boots are Dalbello Krypton pros, black tongue no inserts.  Boots were fitted at GMOL with custom footbeds.  When fitted by GMOL, I was told I have "off the shelf" legs and feet, as in they didn't have to do a lot to correct anything.  They did notice the bottom of the boots (had about 15 days on them) need to be ground flat just to take a slight wobble out of them.

 

A year later the wobble was back and I got the boot bases ground again and plates put on.  Again, they base was ground flat (no cant).  This wasn't done at GMOL.

 

I checked my boots tonight and they wobble again!  More than previously.  I don't walk through parking lots and the entire lodge has rubber matting or carpet.  There is a tiny section of side walk to cross but that is it.

 

My thoughts on this is since the right side turns easy to the right, I would take the wobble out (temporarily to try) by applying duct tape to the left side of the boot and on the left boot put duct tape on the left side.  On both boots I did this only until the wobble was gone.  The right boot got the most with 7 layers.

 

Does this make sense as an approach to try?

 

Are there other methods I should try to get everything back to neutral or at least to figure out if my turning issues while one leg skiing is boot related or something else.

 

Thanks,

Ken

 


Edited by L&AirC - 1/5/12 at 4:08pm
post #2 of 10

Properly aligned boots, both on the fore/aft (sagittal) plane and the lateral (frontal) plane, are key to optimum one legged skiing as you need equal access to both inside and outside edges as well as good contact with the boot tongue via a coordinated synergy between ramp, forward lean and delta angles.

 

A true boot sole is one step in the right direction and important to a positive slop free interface between your boot and your ski edges.

 

If you are unsure about your cant angle it is possible to experiment with layers of duct tape on the AFD pad on the toe piece and the heel pad.  4 layers equals approximately one degree.  Boots can be planed within 1/2 degree increments so experiment in to layer increments.  Once you find your ideal angle, return to the shop and ask them to check to make sure you are symmetrical between your left and right boot and have them plane them to those angles.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks Bud.

 

I did ski today but didn't get a chance to do the one legged skiing on the Metrons.  I did have the tape in place though and everything felt fine.  When I did the one legged skiing the other day, I used the same ski for each leg so before I make any decisions, I want to go back and ski the same ski on the same terrain and see if there is any difference one way or the other.

 

When I was previously fitted, fore/aft and lateral alignment were check and they said it was good.  I don't think I need a cant angle.  I think I need my boots to be true (flat) again.  I think the best thing to do is my experiment and then take that data with me to the fitters.  Hopefully get a better set of plates put on.

 

Thanks,

Ken

post #4 of 10

Ken,

 

are you leaving your boots somewhere really warm at night? is this rocking of the soles wear? or warping?

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post

Ken,

 

are you leaving your boots somewhere really warm at night? is this rocking of the soles wear? or warping?



CEM,

They are in the house but not near any thing warm enough to warp.  Depending on how many logs are on the fire and which room they are in it's between 70 and 75 degrees F (the joy of having a very well insulated house when it's 5 F outside yahoo.gif).  It definitely looks like wear.  Even when I use the boot dryer it is on air only (no heat) and the liners are removed from the shell.  I'll see if I can get a pic. 

 

I'm sure I can get this corrected and is easy work for a fitter but the only ones I know (GMOL at Stratten, VT) that can do this correctly is a 6 hour drive round trip.  More than willing to try someone closer but don't know of one with the right equipment.

 

I looked at them last night and realized I screwed up in my experiment.  Though I took the wobble out, my left cuff is tilted inboard.  I'll play with it today (Adult League Race tonight) and see if I can get into somewhere that can fix this for me correctly this week.

 

Thanks,

Ken

 

post #6 of 10

if it is wear , have them flattened, plated then wear cat tracks, some people don't need a lot of walking to wear a boot pretty unevenly, just depends how they walk... at least then you can have the plates replaced when they wear 

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Yup.  Made an appointment with GMOL for tomorrow.

 

Thanks,

 

Ken

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

Went to GMOL today.  Bill Haight took care of me and it looks like any future issues are on me because the boots are rock solid.

 

He showed me that the plates the previous fitter put on are softer plastic than he uses and that's why they wore down so easy. They wobbled to each side. While there, he also checked me for alignment and it ends up that my left boot need 1.5 shim on the inboard side as I was riding the outside of my foot.  I was kind of surprized when he said this and had my doubts at first but then remembered; that my last alignment was two years ago (when I was told I didn't have any alignment issues), I've since tore an acl and mcl, had it repaired AND I started working on my functional movement. I guess either of those can change my alignment.

 

He had me try it on the hill before he made it permanent and I couldn't believe the difference.  It is now permanent and I can't wait until tomorrow to try it on my race skis.  Hopefully this is why my knees have been swelling up after hard skiing too.

 

Lessons Learned:

  1. It's worth a trip at the start of the season to have your alingment checked.  Whether injured or not, things change that can effect it.  Getting in (or out of) shape, weight change, injuries etc.  I would imagine that even becoming a better skier can effect it. 
  2. Just because you have to drive three hours each way is no excuse not to do this.  After one run with the correction, I no longer minded the drive and I don't much care for driving that far.
  3. Always bring all your ski gear when going to GMOL or any other on hill fitters.  I wasn't planning on skiing and would just get the plates put on. Bill wouldn't make the change (for the alignment issue - not the plates themselves) permanent until I tried it skiing first.  I had everything in the SUV from racing last night minus my snow pants.  I ended up skiing a couple runs in sweat pants!  I was wishing I had on "whitey tighties" today instead of boxers!  Skiing was cold and sitting on the chair wasn't a pleasure either.  It was worth it to get it right though.

 

On top of all that, there was a screw up in the scheduling and they had me scheduled for tomorrow day instead of today.  Bill just worked me in and made it look effortless.

 

I know there are other fitters that can work wonders (maybe even closer to home) but many times I've been in shops and found they are limited either in knowledge or equipment.  GMOL has the equipment and the talent and now they will always have my business and recommendation.

 

Ken

post #9 of 10

great news!  Gotta love a happy ending!

 

You are correct about the physio!  Functional Movement Screening is all the rage at the moment but changing your physical condition takes time and commitment.  Improving your physical fitness or joint flexibility can certainly change your alignment needs.  I recommend to my customers who are aggressively pursuing physical conditioning, that they get their boots aligned for their current condition and periodically (once per year) have their alignment rechecked to see if any tweaks are needed.

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

Happy ending!  Who said anything about a happy ending!  Now I don't have any excuses.  If boots are the most important piece of equipment, Bill just got rid of the best excuse I ever had and I didn't even get a chance to use it.  Now I'll have to make something up if I don't ski well. biggrin.gif

 

On a more serious note, I have spent a bit of time this past year on my stance and making sure that any leg excercises I did were done with my legs/feet positioned no more than hip width apart and feet pointing to the straight ahead (to the annoyance of my PT).  I could also be that my hips "were" tight and I've spent the last few months loosening them and my upper back (you might recall this from the 2 threads on functional movement).  Who'da thunk getting better would make such a difference.

 

I'm now a believer (again).
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post

great news!  Gotta love a happy ending!

 

 

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