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What do you think about atomic b5 metron? - Page 4

post #91 of 109
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Head first View Post

But then again not everybody wants to ski like this.

 

Carving Turn_13001238450.jpg



 

That is exactly as I love to ski, for me this sensation is the best, do you own a pair of b5's?

 

Slider what's sit ski? And what's the side cut on them 151cms do they not feel to short? If you lose balance and get thrown about a bit not much platform to regain form,

 

Tog, I noticed on another post you made about the snow in Alaska being wet and drying out with cold air, how does that make the snow? Avalanche prone?

post #92 of 109

I own 5 pairs of skis from 162-180.  I spend most of my time on my 162cm B5's.  They ski just about anything but I like to arc em down the groomers almost as much as skiing pow.  I don't know what I am going to do when they wear out.   Which won't be too soon... they are built like a brick ___house.

post #93 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Head first View Post

I own 5 pairs of skis from 162-180.  I spend most of my time on my 162cm B5's.  They ski just about anything but I like to arc em down the groomers almost as much as skiing pow.  I don't know what I am going to do when they wear out.   Which won't be too soon... they are built like a brick ___house.



 

I thought I was strange loving the carving sensation and never bothering with pow, I don't live in the mountains so can't choose what days to ski, I used to race on dendex in the uk, every moment I had on snow I practiced and drilled carved turns, 

i take it you don't want to sell your b5 metrons then? I'm going to keep checking on eBay for some,

post #94 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

 

Tog, I noticed on another post you made about the snow in Alaska being wet and drying out with cold air, how does that make the snow? Avalanche prone?



The exact opposite - it makes the snowpack more stable right up until the moisture tying it together is gone, so steeper slopes can get coated with denser snow.

post #95 of 109

Quote:

Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

Tog, I noticed on another post you made about the snow in Alaska being wet and drying out with cold air, how does that make the snow? Avalanche prone?

 

Well that's a different ball of wax.

Apparently, it makes it unique and some of the best in the world. You can ski very steep powder that's like velvet. You definitely wouldn't want the metrons out there.

 

post #96 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Quote:

 

Well that's a different ball of wax.

Apparently, it makes it unique and some of the best in the world. You can ski very steep powder that's like velvet. You definitely wouldn't want the metrons out there.

 



do you know what corn snow is?

post #97 of 109

Yes, it is a snake.

 

Snow+Corn+Snake+Hatchlings.jpg

Photo South Mountain Reptiles    http://snakesnmoresnakes.blogspot.com/2009/07/snow-corn-snake-photos.html

 

Of which do you speak? The coral, the common, or the pink/green?

The Metrons could easily kill that if swung properly.

Why are you now into killing snakes with metrons??

 

In other news, metrons would be "fine" to ski corn in. Of course corn is so nice 2x4's would work also.

Really, I think you should buy a pair.

Maybe start a thread in the swap section looking for a pair.

post #98 of 109
Thread Starter 

i'm not asking about corn for the metrons, im on the hunt for some, but the reason i asked about corn is, everyone rants and raves about it, whats it like to ski on?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Yes, it is a snake.

 

Snow+Corn+Snake+Hatchlings.jpg

Photo South Mountain Reptiles    http://snakesnmoresnakes.blogspot.com/2009/07/snow-corn-snake-photos.html

 

Of which do you speak? The coral, the common, or the pink/green?

The Metrons could easily kill that if swung properly.

Why are you now into killing snakes with metrons??

 

In other news, metrons would be "fine" to ski corn in. Of course corn is so nice 2x4's would work also.

Really, I think you should buy a pair.

Maybe start a thread in the swap section looking for a pair.



 

post #99 of 109

 

Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

Beautiful day and very nice conditions. Nice report.

But since you asked, Grasshopper...

Yes, it counts as corn. Well done for getting out there.

However, like most things in life, "corn" is a spectrum and the devil is in the definitions. I would call your conditions corn but I wouldn't call it 'perfect" corn. As I said in my earlier post, my definition of perfect corn almost always rules out any conditions inside the boundaries of a ski resort.

The reason is that the constant skier traffic in-resort changes the structure and the texture of the snowpack. It leaves small bumps and texture changes in the snow surface that you don't find when you're skiing a huge, open face or bowl that hasn't seen skier traffic all season. You can see that best illustrated in your photos # 3 and 13. The snow surface you're skiing on is affected - to greater or lesser degree - by the tracks left by previous skiers, boarders, groomers, etc. It's a subtle difference but I think it's significant.

Also, check out the depth of the tracks you're skier is leaving in the 2nd and 3rd to the last photos. The depth of those tracks indicates to me that either the snow wasn't quite "THERE" in texture, meaning it was new snow that had started to set up into corn but hadn't yet developed that strong re-freeze bond on top. That, or your timing was just about a half hour late in your skiing time and you were already sinking in past the top layer.

In *my* definition of perfect corn, you only skim the very top, soft, incredibly smooth layer. There's no sinking in. That's what makes perfect corn so delightful.

Maybe it would help to contrast the tracks in your photos with the ones this skier is leaving and maybe you can see what I'm talking about:



Now I know it's nit-picky, but this discussion is very much like arguing the differences between VERY fine wines. Spectacularly good red wines are made in France. Equally great red wines are made in California. Whether one wine is somehow "better" than the other depends not only on personal taste but also on what the taster has previously personally experienced.

What you skied was beautiful and undoubtedly great fun. In the original argument, however, I said that I prefer "perfect" corn to powder skiing for a variety of reasons. I got a fair amount of grief for saying that, but on reflection (and some more perfect corn skiing yesterday I stand by that statement. I've experienced plenty of what practically anybody would consider perfect powder skiing. I've also experienced enough perfect corn skiing to feel comfortable in my opinions. Comparing the very best powder skiing I've ever had to the very best corn skiing I've ever had, I'll take corn.

And with that, I think we both need to get out there and ski some more.

 

2007:

 

Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

I agree that there seems to be a huge divergence on what "corn" skiing is.

I grew up in my skiing journey with the understanding that corn skiing was a very rare, very special condition that only existed in situations where there was very little traffic on a particular slope. Borntoski683's definition is almost identical to mine. You almost NEVER - inbounds - see what I was brought up to believe was corn skiing because the innate reality of skier traffic destroys the natural freeze-thaw cycle that results in corn snow off-piste.

Ergo... corn skiing to me doesn't involve bumps, doesn't involve groomed slopes, doesn't involve anything that can usually be reached from a ski lift. It's all about smooth, open bowls or faces that are operating only on the natural cycles of sun and temperature.

"Real" corn skiing to me is that rarest of natural conditions that results in the smoothest, most predictable, EASIEST skiing there is. You can ski any pitch, any slope, any nutso chute you can imagine with confidence.

"True" corn skiing, however, typically only lasts about an hour per day on a given slope. Once the full sun has been on a smooth, frozen snow surface for longer than that, the snow starts to soften to a depth of three or four inches or more. When that happens, the snow surface starts to get that snow-cone, sloppy, inconsistent quality that a lot of people seem to associate with what I would call "resort corn". If you haven't skied backcountry corn to contrast with resort corn, then I would submit that you haven't really experienced some of the best skiing conditions know to man.

In summary, I think there are multiple definitions of corn.


 

 

 

post #100 of 109
Thread Starter 
So I'm back again on the b5 trip,found a pair in 164 £100, my gf is polish her home town is 30 min from a ski hill, conditions are east coast style, I want a skis for firm conditions that I can just leave over there and save ski carriage charges when flying Ryanair, so are the B5 11's suitable for this?
post #101 of 109

 

Yes.  

 

 

post #102 of 109
Thread Starter 

Alright Cantunamunch,

whats the difference between the b5's and the B5 M11's if there is a difference?

whats the snow like where you are?

Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

Yes.  

 

 



 

post #103 of 109

 

The M11 is  slightly more of a versatile all-rounder at slightly lower speeds.   You'll like it, especially on spotty or irregular snow.

 

 

 

Our snow is unconnected pockets of slushy mud, as of this weekend.   The lifts are shut.

post #104 of 109
Thread Starter 

its all over for you then,

what does everyone talk about during the summer on here?

post #105 of 109

Helmets

post #106 of 109

The Atomic Metron B5. Are THE most sensational all-mountain ski's I've ever skiëd

 

Great off piste ( very easy to handel, Good 'flow' ) also good in wind-blown snow

Great on the pistes with good long and shorts carving curves.

Great on slugish show ( they just don't care )

 

This ski is the audi-quattro under the ski's.....

 

Only disadvatage: need technic on hard/icy pistes: the grip is almost to-good so they  tend to 'bite'

post #107 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jverroen View Post
 

The Atomic Metron B5. Are THE most sensational all-mountain ski's I've ever skiëd

 

try more skis.

post #108 of 109
..
.
Edited by slider - 12/30/14 at 11:49am
post #109 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jverroen View Post

The Atomic Metron B5. Are THE most sensational all-mountain ski's I've ever skiëd

Great off piste ( very easy to handel, Good 'flow' ) also good in wind-blown snow
Great on the pistes with good long and shorts carving curves.
Great on slugish show ( they just don't care )

This ski is the audi-quattro under the ski's.....

Only disadvatage: need technic on hard/icy pistes: the grip is almost to-good so they  tend to 'bite'
More versatile than the Saloman XScream??
Say it ain't so Joe!
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