EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › anyone had pain on outsides of feet in ski boots?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

anyone had pain on outsides of feet in ski boots?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Has any one ever suffered pain on the outsides of their feet from their ski boots? i've been fitted for my boots had custom made foot beds but still i get terrible pain on the outside of my foot, in the fleshy bit just before the toes, this is now my 2nd pair of boots that ive had the same problem with, boots now salomon x wave 9, previous boots technica tnt explosion

post #2 of 20

Sounds like you need to have a good boot fitter match your foot to the right boot and then have it blown out.

post #3 of 20

Visit a bootfitter,either where you bought them or find a local guy to help you. I'm going through the pain of new boots and have to continue the fitting process a bit longer to get them to fit the shape of my feet better.

post #4 of 20

That's a usual problem with me, due to flared feet, until I get the shells blown out and custom liners (Intuition brand) made.  Then my boots fit perfectly.  It sounds like your boots have only been 'partially' fitted.

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ex Racer

what are flared feet?i had them blown out the once, do you think i could probably do with having them blown out more?

i had them fitted about 6 years ago still like brand new as i has a bad tennis injury and packed in skiing

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

Ex Racer

what are flared feet?i had them blown out the once, do you think i could probably do with having them blown out more?

i had them fitted about 6 years ago still like brand new as i has a bad tennis injury and packed in skiing


When you skied them before did you suffer from similar pains ? Possibly in storage or over time the punches you did have done might have reduced or  the boot changed shape over time being heated and cooled over the seasons. Also our feet change with age and maybe just need to be customized to you a little better.

 

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

Garryz

i can't remember if I got it sorted back then, I know I've always suffer with this problem, I'll take them in and get some work done to them, but there is no way I'd be able to ski a whole day in them with that pain, hopefully they can sort the problem for me cheers for your advice mate,

post #8 of 20
I used to have that issue then I went from a 98mm to 100mm boot, fat feet.
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

I used to have that issue then I went from a 98mm to 100mm boot, fat feet.


 

Yes you maybe right the bit where I get the pain is slightly fatter than most folks, but to be honest there is plenty of room in the shell when I take out the liner,

Fingers crossed I can get it blown out and solve the issue

post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

I used to have that issue then I went from a 98mm to 100mm boot, fat feet.


 

Yes you maybe right the bit where I get the pain is slightly fatter than most folks, but to be honest there is plenty of room in the shell when I take out the liner,

Fingers crossed I can get it blown out and solve the issue

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

Ex Racer

what are flared feet?i had them blown out the once, do you think i could probably do with having them blown out more?

i had them fitted about 6 years ago still like brand new as i has a bad tennis injury and packed in skiing

 

By that I mean they're very wide, but not consistently wide along the entire length like some people.... i.e. mine flare out like duck feet.

 

Boots that have been stretched will often shrink back, somewhat, over time.  You might need to get them blown out again.  Did they work on the liner at the same time and thin out the area that was tight?  If you haven't skied for a number of years, your feet may have changed shape as well.  Feet tend to flatten out and get wider between ski seasons, and if it's been six seasons it wouldn't be surprising if your feet are wider now than when you had the boots originally fitted.

 

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by exracer View Post



 

By that I mean they're very wide, but not consistently wide along the entire length like some people.... i.e. mine flare out like duck feet.

 

Boots that have been stretched will often shrink back, somewhat, over time.  You might need to get them blown out again.  Did they work on the liner at the same time and thin out the area that was tight?  If you haven't skied for a number of years, your feet may have changed shape as well.  Feet tend to flatten out and get wider between ski seasons, and if it's been six seasons it wouldn't be surprising if your feet are wider now than when you had the boots originally fitted.

 



 

Thanks for the answer, no they never worked on the liner, I'm going to go back and have some more work done on them, I can't recall if I had the pain back then or not, but I can't image I'd have put up with that to be truely honest, back then I was race training on dry slopes as well do had my boots on a lot, once they heat the boot up any idea what they stretch them out with? 

post #13 of 20

You can also have this kind of pain when the liners pack out and there's too much room. That may be counter intuitive, but I've experienced this myself.

 

According to more than one boot fitter, the X-Waves are high volume boots to begin with and the liners have a tendency to pack out a little more than more than others. As it happens, my last pair of boots were X-Wave 9's and I experienced this myself; they started to get a little sloppy somewhere in the 30-40 day range (wish I could have bought them one size smaller, but a very high instep among other issues precluded that).

post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by garylk View Post

You can also have this kind of pain when the liners pack out and there's too much room. That may be counter intuitive, but I've experienced this myself.

 

According to more than one boot fitter, the X-Waves are high volume boots to begin with and the liners have a tendency to pack out a little more than more than others. As it happens, my last pair of boots were X-Wave 9's and I experienced this myself; they started to get a little sloppy somewhere in the 30-40 day range (wish I could have bought them one size smaller, but a very high instep among other issues precluded that).

 

I've skied probably about 30ish days in them, but the liners seem to still be soft inside, what did you do to solve the problem? Do you have pain free boots now?

Ive been to see a boot fitter today, to be truthfully honest I didn't have a great deal of confidence in him, young lad look suprised when he saw my super feet moulded foot bed, not sure if he knew what they were, ive let him blow them out along the side with the problem area, so I'll wait and see, 

post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by garylk View Post

You can also have this kind of pain when the liners pack out and there's too much room. That may be counter intuitive, but I've experienced this myself.

 

According to more than one boot fitter, the X-Waves are high volume boots to begin with and the liners have a tendency to pack out a little more than more than others. As it happens, my last pair of boots were X-Wave 9's and I experienced this myself; they started to get a little sloppy somewhere in the 30-40 day range (wish I could have bought them one size smaller, but a very high instep among other issues precluded that).



 

P.s what do you mean by pack out

post #16 of 20

Packing out means that the liner compresses with use and leaves you with more room than you might need.

 

post #17 of 20

I suffered from this for years. And pretty much have it licked.

 

I get this sometimes too, riding a bikle with toe straps.

 

3 fixes and understand I have very wide forefoot, high instep and high arches and very rigid feet and ski in a 95mm wide Full Plug race boot.

 

 

#1 NON-posted footbed. If you have a rigid foot and are somewhat suppinated and not pronated. GEt rid of the posted hard bed. Rigid feet don't need that

 

#2  When we make my footbeds we need to artificailly make an indentation in the footbed to accomodate the outside bone on the bottom of my foot directly where you are discussing on your foot. When the beds are formed, the bed never forms a pocket for that bone to sit in.

 

#3 Grind the shell in the area to give you more width. (If the shell thickness allows. I porefer grinds over strectching or punching.

 

 

One addtional help is to ski with your boots very loose first run, stay out of the bumps and stay away from short radius turns. Gp back in the lodge for 10 minutes. Take your boots off, for 5 minutes, put 'em back on and go ski again. I know it's a pain in the arse, but once I do this if I am getting that sort of pain, I am good for the rest of the day.

 

A lot of this depends on the temperature, snow conditions and how I ski during a warm-up run.

 

I still unbuckle my 2 lower buckle every chair ride.

 

It's going to be very interesting, My lace up liners in my Raptor 150's were toast (4 seasons plus I tore one just above the heel) The shells are still stellar and I have spent hundreds having them custom ground to my foot.   So we went with the new Head Foam Pro foamed World Cup Lace Up  Liner. What a process this was. And hurt like hell while they were being foamed.

 

I am pretty sure I can ski in these things without bucleing them at all. At least initially. I can wear my normal ultra thin X-Sock in my left boot, but am ging to have to wear a almost nylon thin dress sock in my rock. At leat the first day.   And just in case, I am bringing my old liners, which are beat but usable, until I get thses new liners somewhat broken in!

 

 

post #18 of 20

By "packing out" I mean compression of the liner with use. This happens to varying degrees in any boot. Usually you feel it before there's any visible evidence.

 

My fitter extended the life my X-wave's life for another season by adding some thin padding to the outside of the liner. Though it eliminated the sloppiness, it created a pressure point on my right foot that we never managed to completely resolve. 

 

The ultimate solution was to replace them with a different boot (which did not yet exist when I bought the X-waves) that could accommodate my high instep in a smaller shell size. That's probably not what you want to hear, but my new boots are still going strong two years and 50+ days later.

 

 

post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

I suffered from this for years. And pretty much have it licked.

 

I get this sometimes too, riding a bikle with toe straps.

 

3 fixes and understand I have very wide forefoot, high instep and high arches and very rigid feet and ski in a 95mm wide Full Plug race boot.

 

 

#1 NON-posted footbed. If you have a rigid foot and are somewhat suppinated and not pronated. GEt rid of the posted hard bed. Rigid feet don't need that

 

#2  When we make my footbeds we need to artificailly make an indentation in the footbed to accomodate the outside bone on the bottom of my foot directly where you are discussing on your foot. When the beds are formed, the bed never forms a pocket for that bone to sit in.

 

#3 Grind the shell in the area to give you more width. (If the shell thickness allows. I porefer grinds over strectching or punching.

 

 

One addtional help is to ski with your boots very loose first run, stay out of the bumps and stay away from short radius turns. Gp back in the lodge for 10 minutes. Take your boots off, for 5 minutes, put 'em back on and go ski again. I know it's a pain in the arse, but once I do this if I am getting that sort of pain, I am good for the rest of the day.

 

A lot of this depends on the temperature, snow conditions and how I ski during a warm-up run.

 

I still unbuckle my 2 lower buckle every chair ride.

 

It's going to be very interesting, My lace up liners in my Raptor 150's were toast (4 seasons plus I tore one just above the heel) The shells are still stellar and I have spent hundreds having them custom ground to my foot.   So we went with the new Head Foam Pro foamed World Cup Lace Up  Liner. What a process this was. And hurt like hell while they were being foamed.

 

I am pretty sure I can ski in these things without bucleing them at all. At least initially. I can wear my normal ultra thin X-Sock in my left boot, but am ging to have to wear a almost nylon thin dress sock in my rock. At leat the first day.   And just in case, I am bringing my old liners, which are beat but usable, until I get thses new liners somewhat broken in!

 

 



I have pronated feet, I had to have orthotics made for every day use, I've suffered from shin splints and tendinitis in my knees when I was playing tennis, I have a fair amount of ankle flex but have torn ligaments in both ankles in the past, tennis injury again, I'll finger tighten my bottom buckles but after skiing a run or two, there is absolutely no tension in the bottom two buckles at all, it's as if I need to tighten them up more but I don't due to the side of foot pain, I've just spoke to another boot fitter who says he'll have a look at it for me so that's my next plan of attack, 

 

post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by garylk View Post

By "packing out" I mean compression of the liner with use. This happens to varying degrees in any boot. Usually you feel it before there's any visible evidence.

 

My fitter extended the life my X-wave's life for another season by adding some thin padding to the outside of the liner. Though it eliminated the sloppiness, it created a pressure point on my right foot that we never managed to completely resolve. 

 

The ultimate solution was to replace them with a different boot (which did not yet exist when I bought the X-waves) that could accommodate my high instep in a smaller shell size. That's probably not what you want to hear, but my new boots are still going strong two years and 50+ days later.

 

 



 

It's looking like I'm going to have a new pair of boots, I live in the uk, i used to ski for about 3 weeks of the year in the alps and ski with a dry slope racing club, not skied for a while and I don't want boots spoiling my skiing

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › anyone had pain on outsides of feet in ski boots?