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Should DIN setting values on skis be the same on both?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Recently got my own gear after  numerous years of using rentals.  Went up to the mountains and I got into a bit of a mishap resulting in a sprained ankle.  Got home and while wiping down my skis noticed that the DIN setting values for the toes were different 7's on one and 5's on the other (5's on the the leg with the sprain).  Common sense tells me that they should be the same value.  Should I adjust the setting back to 7 and 7 or is there something I don't know?

post #2 of 9
Yes the should be the same unless you have pre-release issues. An example would be marker dukes, some people have a higher heal DIN setting than the toe.
post #3 of 9

In theory yes, in practice, not necessarily.

 

Each binding component varies as it comes off the production line and the condition of your boot soles will vary left to right as well. The result of these variables is that each binding component may vary in actual release value when it is tested after mounting. Part of the testing process in mounting bindings is that each component will be adjusted in order to release within a given range of values. Sometimes the combined variables will require differing settings on one or more of the components. It is also possible that one of the binding components was overlooked in the process and that oversight resulted in that toepiece being left at the setting at which it was packed in the box. There is no way to know for sure other than have the bindings tested and adjusted again by a shop with proper equipment and expertise.

 

SJ

post #4 of 9

I had bindings set to crazy positions on the rear portion--literally a 10 on the rear and a 6.5 on the toe, based on different pressure test outcomes. Like SierraJim says, a good shop will run a pressure test for you. (Poorly equipped/staffed shops won't/can't. There are many such shops.)

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

I had bindings set to crazy positions on the rear portion--literally a 10 on the rear and a 6.5 on the toe, based on different pressure test outcomes. Like SierraJim says, a good shop will run a pressure test for you. (Poorly equipped/staffed shops won't/can't. There are many such shops.)



FWIW............THAT much variation would raise a red flag to me. Depending upon the initial (pre test) settings, that large a variation might fall outside the acceptable limits of re-adjustment. Then again, if the initial setting was say (8) then that variation is a little unusual but not too far out of whack. Just as a precaution, it might be worth while to examine your boot soles for excessive wear and/or damage.

 

 

 

SJ

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

I had bindings set to crazy positions on the rear portion--literally a 10 on the rear and a 6.5 on the toe, based on different pressure test outcomes. Like SierraJim says, a good shop will run a pressure test for you. (Poorly equipped/staffed shops won't/can't. There are many such shops.)


Holy crap, at most I've had a 1.0 difference. I would not use those bindings. Your life depends on your bindings performing properly.
post #7 of 9

In the last few years, every time any shop touched my bindings, they had me verify the DIN on each piece, and sign off that they were correct.

 

Given that, I would be concerned seeing a 5 and a 7.  I would definitely want to check whether I had a "left" and "right" ski, if these numbers were indeed based on release testing.  In fact, I would probably request the tech to repeat the tests in my presence, trying both boots with each ski.

 

 

post #8 of 9

It is not that unusual to have to increase or decrease the visual indicator setting (din) so that it is releasing within what is called the inspection range. The binding manufactures even call the din number that you find on the chart "the initial indicator setting". They also state  that the initial indicator setting (din) is just a starting point, and that you must perform a release function test on the system. As long as the binding falls into something they call the in use range, the binding is ok to use. By turning the din up or down, you can get the binding to release in the inspection range. This is why rental shops have to test their entire fleet prior to each season. They then have to use correction factors like +.5 or -2 on skis falling outside the inspection range. That means that each time the binding is adjusted they have to add or subtract .5 or 2 or what ever. The only manufacture that I have seen to put a limit on the correction factor is Marker. They say that the maximum of + or- 2. So one binding set on 5 and the other at 7 would be fine. If you don't use correction factors, you are breaking the manufactures rules. I didn't make this stuff up, just read the binding manuals.


Edited by mark254 - 1/4/12 at 10:21pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post


Holy crap, at most I've had a 1.0 difference. I would not use those bindings. Your life depends on your bindings performing properly.


 

Oh, thanks. Fortunately one of the skis broke and they're no longer in use. (If nothing else it was a good lesson in not buying ex-demos.)

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