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Good Women's Boot For Narrow Feet?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have boots that are about 10 years old or so, but I haven't used them much since I'm just now really getting back into skiing.  Last season I had problems with getting a good fit around my left calf and when I had my local shop help me figure it out I came to the conclusion that my boots are too big.  Not only do I have too much room in the toe, my foot is narrow and I have too much movement side to side.  

 

 

So I wasn't anticipating buy new boots anytime soon, but I'm doing some preliminary research on what I should go with.  I'm looking for something good for narrow feet and something that is a good value, I don't need top of the line.  I'm going to check with my local shops but want to be educated about it.  I was fitted for these current boots when I was entering college and just went with what they told me.  Any help would be appreciated.  Thanks!

post #2 of 12

Bootfitters are most knowledgable but I have questions.

What boots do you have now?

Do you know it's width? (98, 100, 102 mm etc) and mondo size?

What flex are they?

How good a skier are you? Strictly telemark the last 10 years or alpine too? Could you handle a racing boot? They are the narrowest.

When you say narrow  would you take an A, AA or AAA street shoe or are you more average width than that?

You might also post this over on the 'Ask the boot guys' forum and read the very informative Wiki at the top of that site.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all your questions- this made me realize all the things I need to think about.  And I didn't know about the "Ask the Boot Guys", so thanks for that as well.  Right now I have (from what I gather off of the boot) a pair of Solomon Evolution 8.0 Performa that are 320/25, 292mm.  At the store I measured just about a 24.5 on my bigger foot, left foot is a little smaller.  My name is misleading- I don't telemark.  I started skiing when I could walk, but I haven't been doing it continuously.  I can get down whatever you put me at the top of, but it doesn't mean I'll do it gracefully ;)  I took a bit of a hiatus from skiing during and just after college (except for 4-5 trips) and now that my son is old enough to learn and we live extremely close to a ski area, I'll be doing it more.  Because of the kids I'll probably be spending more time on beginner slopes than I'd like!

 

I don't know what the technical width of my foot is, but I am definitely on the narrow side.  There are many shoes I can't wear because of width.  What would the characteristics of a racing boot be vs. a "regular" boot?

 

Thanks so much!  I hope to get to some of the shops soon an "size up" this situation.  I just didn't have the time to fully pursue it when I was in the other day.

post #4 of 12

If you can try on a Lange RX 120(can be softened if needed) in a size 25.5 and they would work for you, I have a pair for sale that are virtually new.   Dave

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

My boots are similar to these: 

 

http://www.geartrade.com/item/120870

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Wouldn't that be too big if my 25's are too big?

post #7 of 12

I didn't catch the woman's part, sorry. Re-reading the post, you would be better off with something softer due to the kind of skiing you are planning on doing. The Lange Exclusive line and the Fischer Soma My Style line run a tad on the narrow side. Both you can get in various flexes as well.

post #8 of 12

I remember selling the Evolution series boots years ago.  They were built on a high volume last.  That explains your feet wandering inside your boots.

 

Most major brands have a few narrowish women's cut boots in 97 to 99 mm lasts.

 

Another option (since you mentioned it) is to go to a race boot.  Race boots are very spartan.  Usually the only adjustments one gets are shaft alignments, micro adjustable buckles, and maybe a removable rear spoiler.  You may find some shells as narrow as 93 mm, but many are found at the 95 mm width.  Generally the boots for bigger juniors (the 90 to 110 flex boots) have lower cuffs that work well for a woman's lower calf muscle.

 

It reads like you were able to get a good assessment on your old boots from your local shop.  Hopefully you can get the right fit there.

 

Good luck with your search.

 

Dennis

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by telemarksc View Post

Thanks for all your questions- this made me realize all the things I need to think about.  And I didn't know about the "Ask the Boot Guys", so thanks for that as well.  Right now I have (from what I gather off of the boot) a pair of Solomon Evolution 8.0 Performa that are 320/25, 292mm.  At the store I measured just about a 24.5 on my bigger foot, left foot is a little smaller.  My name is misleading- I don't telemark.  I started skiing when I could walk, but I haven't been doing it continuously.  I can get down whatever you put me at the top of, but it doesn't mean I'll do it gracefully ;)  I took a bit of a hiatus from skiing during and just after college (except for 4-5 trips) and now that my son is old enough to learn and we live extremely close to a ski area, I'll be doing it more.  Because of the kids I'll probably be spending more time on beginner slopes than I'd like!

 

I don't know what the technical width of my foot is, but I am definitely on the narrow side.  There are many shoes I can't wear because of width.  What would the characteristics of a racing boot be vs. a "regular" boot?

 

Thanks so much!  I hope to get to some of the shops soon an "size up" this situation.  I just didn't have the time to fully pursue it when I was in the other day.


Heh, I have a similar story to you. Skied my whole life, through college, but then moved married had babies all that good stuff and skied maybe only three or four times from age 22-30. When I returned to Colorado (and skiing)  and bought boots, "they" put me in that same exact boot! And a size too big, as well. My experience is that even if you think you're out of practice, you'll catch up faster than you expected. It wasn't long before I was swimming in and folding that boot in half.

 

The good news is that there seem to be a lot more narrow women's boots these days without having to go to a full-on race boot. Also that you live near a ski area -- even in Denver, it's difficult to find a wide range of women's boots until you hit the mountain shops. Obviously you will need to be fitted and you appear to understand that, but some of the lower-volume lasts will be the Tecnica Viva Inferno, Full Tilt, Dalbello Krypton, .. I think all the brands have a decent narrow boot these days. 

post #10 of 12

I have the same problem--SUPER narrow feet and have had a heck of a time finding boots. Even a 98mm last is too wide for me. I just went to a Salomon Instinct CS boot that is essentially a race fit and I think with the help of a good fitter, I'll be able to make it work. It's a 98mm last and I bought it in a size 22. It's a 90 flex which works fine with my skill level (I'm stuck at intermediate!)

 

One thing that I didn't consider when buying boots is looking at a Jr. Race boot. I wear a size 7 in street shoes (and can go to a 6.5 in certain shoes.) If you have smaller feet, this could also be an option for you. Definitely get to a good mountain shop! Being armed with some of the knowledge you gather here should help you walk in armed with the right questions, concerns, etc. and also know if you are getting good advice/service or not.

post #11 of 12

Read this http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

The question isn't  'What boots?' the real question is 'What bootfitter'. Like auto mechanics and building contractors there are a lot of people out there who call themselves bootfitters but know only enough more than the customer to sell them the wrong boot. Based on my wife's experience shopping for boots, being a woman can bring additional issues. An inexperienced bootfitter may make preconceptions like - she's intermediate, she's not an aggressive skier, comfort is more important than proper fit. With the knowledge from the website you will be able to tell if the person you are talking to has a clue and if they don't at least shell fit you just walk away and don't waste your time.

Good luck

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Sorry for the late reply, thank you for all the help/resources.  When I get the money I will be all over this!

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