EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Member Gear Reviews › 88mm skis: Blizzard Bushwacker, Magnum 8.7, Elan Apex, Head Peak 90, Kastle MX88, Rossi Exp. 88, Volkl Kendo
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88mm skis: Blizzard Bushwacker, Magnum 8.7, Elan Apex, Head Peak 90, Kastle MX88, Rossi Exp. 88, Volkl Kendo

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

 

88m Ski test:

 

Rossignol Experience 88 178cm

Head Peak 90 177cm

Elan Apex 177cm

Volkl Kendo 177cm

Kastle MX88 178cm

Blizzard Magnum 8.7 174cm

Blizzard Bushwacker 180cm

 

 

 

About me: 5 foot 9, 155lbs, ski 30-50 days a year, tend to prefer mostly off-piste terrain. Get a lot of big, wide open off-piste skiing here, rarely bumps, but I do enjoy tight spaces. Can ski the whole mountain, but try to stay away from big air.

 

Testing conditions: a couple of different days on this group (thanks to Mt. Bachelor Sport Shop for the loaners from Rossi. We don't sell the Kendo, this is my personal pair). Others are my shop demos. Skis were tested on a soft snow, sunny day in the mid-40's. A couple of inches new overnight. 2nd day was some newer snow off-piste (heavy snow that came in a few inches deep in a few spots) on this more recent system (that is now all rain-yuk). Wish the weather gods would let us bank some snow from “good” years, like last season. Tired of this great year/crappy year cycle.

 

Instead of reviewing each ski individually, I will just group them in various conditions.  Somewhat grouped based on performance, but often many of the skis come down to personal preference and a group is similar in performance, just different in feel. Ties aren't mentioned, so don't worry about the rankings too much. 

 

Hard snow and groomers

 

The E88 was a very thrilling carver. Plenty of stability here in the 178cm length. Turn radius wasn't quite as variable as I would like: it seemed to lock into a turn shape more than the others. With that said, it was stable and powerful, and held a great edge.

 

The MX88 was different in feel: edge grip was probably better, but as a carver, it was a little more damp and not as energetic in the tail. More of a GS feel, similar to the Apex and Kendo, but with more stability and grip than those 2, and more stable than the E88 as well. It liked any radius turn more than the E88, but wants to run in big arcs and at speed.

 

The Magnum 8.7 was a real powerhouse on groomers. It is built somewhat similar to the E88 in purpose: great groomer ski, solid all-mountain performance. Lots of metal, and it is powerful in the tip and tail. A little stiff though, but other than that, great grip, tons of stability. It was a thrilling carver if you set up the turn well; I could really trust the ski at the top of the turn. The finish was very powerful as well. Great carver for a “wider” ski: it skis narrower than the footprint.

 

The Apex was great in mid-radius turns: the new rockered tip really makes the ski quicker and more nimble when skiing fall-line. Plenty stable in bigger arcs too; super damp and powerful. Edge grip was not quite up to the MX88's standard, but close, and as good as the E88. Great ability to vary turn radius; probably the best of the group here, as it is a touch softer and allows me to flex it as needed, both tip and tail.

 

Kendo: a little less damp than the Apex, light and lively, muscular on the snow. Stability was similar to the others, it had more of an aggressive initiation at the tip than the Apex or MX88, so a bit more thrilling top of the turn. More of a GS ski; I couldn't bend it into smaller arcs as well as the others, or butter the ski. Likes speed, as stable as the MX88. Feels very GS. They should have named this ski the Katana, as it is as stiff as a steel sword.  Very precise, just be ready to ski it. 

 

Head Peak 90: also a solid frontside ride. Lots of pop in the tail, good stability for not having metal. Tip is nice and soft; I could work the ski well tip to tail, and found it grippy yet not too aggressive. Nice blend of performance. Stability is above that of the Bushwacker, slightly below the others, in rough snow.

 

Bushwacker: probably the only ski that was only OK on these conditions. Much better groomer ski than the Bonafide (probably due to low tip and tail rise) but still bothered by the lack of tip at the top of the turn. When doing a “weighted release/White Pass Turn”, I have trouble trusting the ski and rolling quickly onto edge; I feel I have to weight/unweight upward more on this ski, and rely on outside ski/big toe engagement early on, due to the fact I can't flex an inside ski to get the tip into the snow early enough. Would prefer a ski that supported a smoother 2-footed transition and equal pressure/edge angles at the top. Once on edge, it is OK, but lacks metal, and does get bounced at 25mph or so (others are much more stable up to 35-40mph). The inside ski tracks funny as well, for the same reason I mentioned before: when you are flexing and tipping that inside knee to get more angulation, the inside ski bounces more than it tracks (again, no tip). I felt it was an OK groomer ski as long as I kept things low-energy and the feet under the hips, and didn't really try to ski too dynamically with an aggressive release to keep my COM moving down the fall line, but skiing dynamically is pretty much part of the definition of carving, so that isn't great. If you are a low energy skier who is more or less cruising, you will probably think this is just fine on the groomers: I would recommend the 8.7 for a high-performance groomer ski from Blizzard.

 

Bumps:

 

Elan Apex: really nice in bumps; softer tip than most of the rest, forgiving tail, smooth, forgiving, easy to pilot. I can really work this ski. My favorite of the group

 

Head Peak 90: very close to the Apex: it has a soft tip that flexes well in bumps. Tail not aggressive, a very predictable release as well.. Quick edge to edge.

 

Rossi E88: close, a little stiffer in the tail made it more aggressive. Still a fun bump ski, I felt I had to really focus on an aggressive terrain absorption on this one, to keep the energy down and the ski on the snow.

 

Kastle MX88: a little stiff for bumps: good enough, but can get away from you in the tail just a little bit.

 

Volkl Kendo: similar to the MX88 here. Nice, but could be less aggressive, especially at the tail.

 

Blizzard Bushwacker: not a bad firm bump ski; a little vague in the tip, and the tail felt washy at times. Better in the soft bumps I skied last spring.

 

Blizzard 8.7: still decent in bumps, but a little aggressive when it is firm. A bit softer tip and less aggressive tail would be welcome.

 

Soft cruddy snow and trees:

 

Elan Apex: very good here as well. Nice, balanced ski; not overly edgy, which is awesome in steeps. You can release progressively if you really have to get an aggressive pole plant down the hill on a steep pitch. Easy to turn in the trees, releases with ease as well, tail has a great flex.

 

Kastle MX88: more stable than any other ski in bigger turns, able to butter it in tighter areas. Almost as easy to ski as the Apex.

 

Volkl Kendo: slightly more aggressive, a little more edge feel in short radius, fall line steeps. Great in bigger arcs, 2nd in stability only to the MX88. Quick, not as rapid-fire as the Apex, though. More of a GS feeling ski than most.

 

Blizzard Bushwacker: also very quick, easy to change edge sets, as easy as the Apex was. Lack of metal hurts it at speed in bigger turns. Very good at slower speeds and tight spaces, just more easily overpowered than the others. If beefed up, would be near the top of this group.

 

Rossi E88: lots of stability, but a bit catchy and edgy in steeps, when you need to make a turn in the space of a few feet; it can feel aggressive and not easy to butter and release smoothly. Still not bad, totally workable. Quick, and stable at speed.

 

Head Peak 90: about the same level of performance that the Rossi gave me here. These skis are similar in feel. The Peak, being a bit softer, seemed to change turn radius better and be less aggressive in fall line turns.. The E88 was a touch more stable in rough snow. Both are very solid all-mountain performers off-piste.

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.7: perhaps the most aggressive of the group. Fine in bigger arcs, but a little catchy in the tip in crud at speed. Shorter length seems to hurt it a bit too. Wants to be on edge more than the others, so can feel touchy in 3-D snow. Quick edge to edge.  Not bad at all, but a little below the others. 

 

Overall:

 

I liked all of these skis, but they all had different feels. Listed in alphabetical order:

 

Blizzard Bushwacker: good off-piste ski, predictable as long as you aren't pushing it too hard..

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.7: powerhouse wide carver. More groomer oriented than off-piste.

 

Elan Apex: well balanced GS feel without being too stiff. Performs above average in most every condition. Good ski for lighter guys like me.

 

Head Peak 90: Mainly GS feel, but with a touch more pop in the tail. Tip is nice in crud and bumps. Not quite as grippy as the skis with metal, super fun in any other snow condition.

 

Kastle MX88: very good both frontside and back. The most refined feel in the group, also the most stable, with probably the best edge hold. Not a true carver.

 

Rossignol Experience 88: more akin to the carver feel of the 8.7, but more forgiving. Nice ski at speed, versatile, slightly more biased toward groomers.

 

Volkl Kendo: a GS feel, fairly stiff and aggressive, good edge hold, not really a carver. Competent in every condition, a true all-mountain ski.

 

I enjoyed all of these skis, and would probably happily own any of them, with the exception of the Bushwacker, which I found too soft at speed and not great on groomers, which is a requirement for me for a ski this narrow. 

post #2 of 21

I swear it's not schadenfreude, but I find some relief that finally, after months of only positive comments, someone else finally found the deficiencies in the Bushwacker and Rossi E88 as all-mountain skis that I felt last spring. (  http://www.epicski.com/t/102886/demo-day-briefs-50-50-skis-84-to-88mm-wide#post_1327079   ) And in MUCH more detail!

 

We're grateful for your thorough work, Dawg.

 

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

Skis were tested on a soft snow, sunny day in the mid-40's. A couple of inches new overnight. 2nd day was some newer snow off-piste (heavy snow that came in a few inches deep in a few spots) [snip] Wish the weather gods would let us bank some snow from “good” years, like last season. Tired of this great year/crappy year cycle.

 

OMG, Dawg, I'm sure I'm going to be very well informed by your review when I get to reading it, but was totally derailed by this piece of insensitivity. biggrin.gif   You ARE aware, are you not, that many parts of ski country are still brown, brown, and more brown, at this point, right? We would walk miles for ANYTHING off-piste or "a few inches deep," never mind if it was "heavy." Let alone " a soft snow sunny day in the mid-40s." You are killing us here.  Sheesh. nonono2.gif

post #4 of 21

You aren't going to pick a favorite?

post #5 of 21
Dawg, I'm curious about why you own a personal set of Kendos. You don't seem to favor those over most of the others.

I'm heavier than you (180) and tried my new 170 Kendos the other day. My impressions of the ski are a bit different no doubt because of the differences in our weight and the ski lengths. Stable, certainly. But I found the turn radius fairly easy to shorten up. I didn't feel like these skis needed me to bring my A game. I found them remarkably composed and cooperative. I'm sure I'd feel differently with the 177s.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ed_d View Post

Dawg, I'm curious about why you own a personal set of Kendos. You don't seem to favor those over most of the others.
I'm heavier than you (180) and tried my new 170 Kendos the other day. My impressions of the ski are a bit different no doubt because of the differences in our weight and the ski lengths. Stable, certainly. But I found the turn radius fairly easy to shorten up. I didn't feel like these skis needed me to bring my A game. I found them remarkably composed and cooperative. I'm sure I'd feel differently with the 177s.


I wanted to try something different, and I do like them.  More as an all-mountain ski than a carver though.  The conditions I had tested in were more frontside oriented.  The Kendo is a very nice ski; well rounded.  It was about the same as the Apex for me, although the Apex is just a touch softer and more maneuverable, not quite as stable, and a touch more damp.  The Kendo wasn't a problem to ski, just a little more stout, and required me to pay attention more than on the E88.  Fun kind of skied-out off-piste ski and GS ski. 

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesoggycow View Post

You aren't going to pick a favorite?



Nah.  Everytime I do that, somebody gets angry. Plus, it would be hard to pick an absolute favorite out of this group.  I might lean toward the MX88, but that ski is just a touch stiff for me in tight, steep, unforgiving bumps, and I really like to ski bumps on a narrower all-mountain ski.  Feel and stability wise, it is the best.  Pretty much I would be happy owning any of these.  They are all just a little different.

post #8 of 21

Hi DC,

 

Many thanks for this review, I definetely look fwd to your reviews at the start of each season!

 

You do seem to favour (slightly?) the MX88 over the rest but you say its not a true carver. Might be a dumb question but could you explain what you mean by this?

 

Many thanks

post #9 of 21

I found a killer deal on a new pair of 2011 Elan 177 Apex.  Is this the same ski as the 2012 version? 

 

I want to replace my 178 Scott Mission skis which have been rock skis this year and also used on between snow weeks and mostly for playing in bumps.  The Missions do have a bit of speed limit, but are fun for playing around.  I like the 14 metre turn radius on the Missions, although the slightly longer radius of the Apex would also have a place.  Other DH skis in my current quiver include 185 JJs, 187 Bonafides, and several GS and SL race skis.

 

post #10 of 21

BTW Dawg,

 

I really like the format of your current review.  It hits the performance aspects of skis that I find important, and the side-by-side comparison highlights the ski differences. 

post #11 of 21

Dawg

Great review, really helpful plowing through the sea of choices.

I have been trying a bunch of skis over the years in an effort to replace my Solomon Foils (which have too many days on them now) without any luck in finding an equivilant or better ski for my preferred type of skiing. I've been able to get by on my Shoguns for the last couple of years because we had snow but not the case this year. We are almost exactly the same height and weight and I believe prefer similar terrain; bumps and trees. 

 

I'm not sure if you have skied the Foils but they are a finesse ski, quick, light and very nimble. I'm not looking for a damp ski (numb in my opinion). I have narrowed it down to the Apex, Steadfast and the Head you reviewed here. In your opinion which one would be most similar, not looking for GS type turn basically medium radius and a soft tip for bump skiing.

post #12 of 21

Dawg,

 

Nice reviews as always.  Question about the Apex though, how much does the addition of tip rocker to this year's model change the ski compared to last year's Apex?  I was also wondering how much a difference in length has on the ski.  Would the Apex in a 168 be noticably quicker in bumps and tight spaces compared to the 177?  Would there be a significant loss in stability at speed with a 168 versus a 178?

 

Again,

Thanks

post #13 of 21

Good reviews and thanks for posting.  I am looking for newer skis as I have lost a lot of weight.  I went from 215 lb to 165 lb.  I cannot drive my present skis the way I did last year.   I tried the E88 and found them to put a big smile on my face.  I am glad to hear they are fine in the bumps.  Lively is what I like.   I also tried the Elan Amphibio and didn't really care for the feel athough I did not overpower them. I skied them on the corrrect feet and on the wrong feet and found for frontside carving, I kinda like them on the wrong feet.  I think the Amphibio would be good in the bumps but I have not tried them there.

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post

Good reviews and thanks for posting.  I am looking for newer skis as I have lost a lot of weight.  I went from 215 lb to 165 lb.  I cannot drive my present skis the way I did last year.   I tried the E88 and found them to put a big smile on my face.  I am glad to hear they are fine in the bumps.  Lively is what I like.   I also tried the Elan Amphibio and didn't really care for the feel athough I did not overpower them. I skied them on the corrrect feet and on the wrong feet and found for frontside carving, I kinda like them on the wrong feet.  I think the Amphibio would be good in the bumps but I have not tried them there.



Dawg, are you still a fan of the Motive 84s?  I very nearly bought those last year (only availability held me back), and it seems like they do what Pierre is looking for.  I still have yet to demo them, it's been nagging at me since I read about them in your midfat mega review last year.

 

Of course, I couldn't be happier with the consolation prize I bought in place of the Motive 84s:  MX88s.  As much as I got out of reviews from Scott, it was talking with him that really turned up the focus on what skis would make me happy.  

post #15 of 21

I had the opportunity to demo the 178 MX88 yesterday.  Conditions-- 10 cm (4 inches) fresh, but wind effected (heavy) powder, some groomed, and some tree glades with moderately small bumps.  I'm 5'10, about 175 pounds, but was heavier yesterday because it was about -20 C  (-4F) and was dressed for cold. 

 

I was really impressed with this ski.  First impression on the groomers was the excellent edge hold and the energy that the ski has.  I could really load the ski and when released rocket forward.  This, of course, made the ski much fun in the groomers.  Control of the radius of the turn is also excellent on this ski and it would do nice tight energetic turns and more relaxed arcs.  Toward the end of the day there was a bit of crud, and the MX88 handled that quite well - cut through crud like it wasn't there.  These felt very stable at speed either in the crud or groomed.  They felt smooth all day on almost any snow conditions. 

 

In the glades I was impressed with how quick these skis are.  It was "hero" conditions with soft and mostly not very big bumps, so I didn't get much chance to get a good feeling on more difficult conditions.  Having said that, I was nicely impressed with these skis in the few areas of larger bumps.  I would not call the MX88 a relaxed bump ski, and I noticed that the tail let me know if I got too lazy.  Once I knew that the skis needed to be driven, I had lot of fun in the bumps and tress.    I'd like to try the 88s again in bigger harder bumps.  The ski really shined in the trees - was smooth and precise!  Felt very comfortable skiing fast in tight trees.

 

In the not so deep powder, the skis did well, but I wouldn't really call 4 inches to be test of the skis powder capability.


Edited by canadianskier - 1/16/12 at 10:00am
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FairToMiddlin View Post



Dawg, are you still a fan of the Motive 84s?  I very nearly bought those last year (only availability held me back), and it seems like they do what Pierre is looking for.  I still have yet to demo them, it's been nagging at me since I read about them in your midfat mega review last year.

 

Of course, I couldn't be happier with the consolation prize I bought in place of the Motive 84s:  MX88s.  As much as I got out of reviews from Scott, it was talking with him that really turned up the focus on what skis would make me happy.  


The Motive 84 is a great ski. Too bad it was discontinued. I considered buying it as my frontside do-everything ski.  That MX88 isn't too bad, either!  I always fall in love with that ski. One of these days, I may have to get a pair, but as close as it to other skis I own, an MX78 makes more sense for me.  Those 2 skis are really classics, in a good way.  Even though they have been in the lineup longest from Kastle, they are still our best sellers.  

 

 

 

 

post #17 of 21

Any thoughts on the Line Phantom 90 that would have fallen nicely in this group?

post #18 of 21

Tried the 177 Apex this weekend at Kicking Horse.  Binding = Solomon Sth 14 - boot 2 cm back of center line.  Me = about 180 lbs & aggressive skier (for a 50 year old).

 

Conditions were a bit rough with no new snow for a week and most runs were hard pack or cut-up older snow. The skiing at Kicking Horse is mostly chutes and bowls, with some tree skiing and the bottom half of the hill is bumped with a couple of groomed runs.  Vertical of hill = 4200 feet.  Total skiing on the Apex = about 20,000 vertical .  Visibility was not great.

 

I discussed the Apex in relation to my experience on the 187 Bonafide's (which has been my daily ski) to highlight the ski characteristics that I observed.  This is a bit unfair as the conditions were not favorable for a shorter softer ski, but "it is what it is". 

 

Overall, I was not happy with the Apex and ended up switching to the Bones for half of Saturday and all of Sunday and left the Apex in my vehicle.  In general, the Apex did not feel solid in the conditions and I felt that I over-powered it much of the time, except for some of the bump skiing.  In steeper chutes, the Apex tips tended to deflect (the snow was medium hard and choppy) whereas the Bones drove through the crud and gave a nice solid feel when I had to jump turn in narrow areas.  When I attempted to gain speed in the choppy snow and carve through the chop in wider areas, I again felt that the Apex skis deflected and the Bones carved nicely through the chop.  In tighter trees, the Apex was a bit more maneuverable, but because the snow was choppy, I preferred the solid feel of the Bones.

 

I was reasonably happy on the few groomers that we did, and the Apex carved well, but not great.  However, I didn't feel as confident on the ski and had a sense of over-powering it at higher speeds.  Again, I felt that the Bones, once hooked in, were more solid at speed.  To be fair, perhaps this was because of familiarity with the Bones over the Apex.   I liked the Apex on lower angle (not steep chute) bump runs as it was decent edge to edge and the soft tips and tails are forgiving.  Having said that, the bump runs at the Horse have a nice rhythm tend to be created by better skiers with longer skis (not as staccato as bumps created by shorter skis), so the Bones did just as well.  The Apex did better in tight bumps and were fun.  The edge that the Apex has over the Bones in bumps is that the Apex is more forgiving of mistakes.  At my weight and the ski length, the edge that the Bones had in the bumps is the energy of the ski - the Apex does not have tonnes of energy.    Not much powder this week, so I can't comment on that.

 

I would have liked to try the 186 Apex -

 

 

 

 


Edited by canadianskier - 2/14/12 at 1:36pm
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post

 

I would have liked to try the 186 Apex -

 

 

 

 



Yeah, that is probably a good call!  Kevin skied the 177cm Apex (actually the 2013 888, same ski) and love it in the bumps last week, but thought it was too short in bigger turns.  He skied the Bonafide 187 the same day and said it was more solid at speed.  Apex had more quickness and life, better on and off edge.  Bonafide more stable, bigger feeling, more of a GS board.  Of course, much of this is likely due to the length differences.  Why we go to demos and they only have one length (mid 170's), I have no idea.  Not everyone is my size. He owns a 186cm Apex from last year, so I can see if he wants to share his thoughts.  He tends to like narrower skis, especially in bumps and skied out steeps, and wider skis for new snow. 

 

I skied only the Apex 177cm that day, so nothing to add there, except that it was really well balanced and a great ski for my weight.  No weaknesses. 

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post



Yeah, that is probably a good call!  Kevin skied the 177cm Apex (actually the 2013 888, same ski) and love it in the bumps last week, but thought it was too short in bigger turns.  He skied the Bonafide 187 the same day and said it was more solid at speed.  Apex had more quickness and life, better on and off edge.  Bonafide more stable, bigger feeling, more of a GS board.  Of course, much of this is likely due to the length differences.  Why we go to demos and they only have one length (mid 170's), I have no idea.  Not everyone is my size. He owns a 186cm Apex from last year, so I can see if he wants to share his thoughts.  He tends to like narrower skis, especially in bumps and skied out steeps, and wider skis for new snow. 

 

I skied only the Apex 177cm that day, so nothing to add there, except that it was really well balanced and a great ski for my weight.  No weaknesses. 

 

There are lots of factors that impact how a ski does.  In this case, the demo of a softer and shorter ski on gnarly snow (hard here, soft there, with pockets of what looks like soft but is partly frozen sluff) didn't have a chance against a stiffer and longer ski.  30 to 40 extra pounds would also make a difference for this ski and length.  The poor visibility negatively affected my ability to put the ski on the best line, whereas the Bone was stiff enough not to deflect in spite of sometimes poor line due to limited visibility.  Head issues also got in my way with the Apex.  There were spots where a screw-up would not be good thing and taking a new and untrusted ski into that condition left me with less confidence and probably more tentative and poorer ski technique.

 

For what it's worth, two of my friends demoed the Cochise and found some difficulty with the ski in that day.  One friend, an ex-racer, preferred his Magnum 8.7 that day and only skied on the Cochise for two runs.
 

 


Edited by canadianskier - 2/16/12 at 7:42am
post #21 of 21

I just came across this post, and while I realize it is 2 years old, you tested skis in the width and close to the length that I am interested in.  Also, the models tested are what I'm interested in, too.

 

I do have a few questions.

 

Which of these skis would you recommend for a 6'1", approx. 240 pound person?  I ski in Colorado, but do try to ski Bachelor a few days as my MIL lives in Bend.  I tend to stick to groomers, but would like the ski to be able to handle spring crud as well as some powder.  Front range ski areas don't get a lot of powder all at once, so say powder around 12 inches deep would be what I'd be skiing on occasion.  I'm an intermediate/advanced skier and love skiing newly groomed black or double black diamonds.  We recently had a lot of snow dropped over a period of 4 days at Copper and I did laps on Triple Zero, which is part of the Resolution bowl.  It was a little cruddy on the sides, which I had a few problems with as I am skiing 13 year old Atomic Beta Rides, 186cm (I think they are 78mm or so width).  

 

I'd like to stick with a 88mm wide ski and 180cm length.  Would like the ski to be able to handle slightly tighter than GS turns, but would be OK with stable GS turns.  Definitely want rocker tip, but would be OK with rocker tip and tail as long as it could carve, too.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Member Gear Reviews › 88mm skis: Blizzard Bushwacker, Magnum 8.7, Elan Apex, Head Peak 90, Kastle MX88, Rossi Exp. 88, Volkl Kendo